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  1. #1
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    Default Isolating hip drops

    Hi there

    I've been practicing my hip drops and I can't seem to get that real isolation down. I don't know if this is because I don't have strong oblique muscles to be able to lift my hip enough to get a clean isolated look. I will keep praticing, but the more I am learning the more I am realizing you really do need to have a very strong core and lots of flexibility to master even the most basic movements. I notice they tend to get sore after I've been practicing for awhile, so I don't want to over do it.

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    Moderator Darshiva's Avatar
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    It sounds to me like you're doing everything right, and that all you need is just a little patience (to quote Axl Rose). Also, pay particular attention to giving your obliques a good long stretch after doing your drills, it will help with the soreness & encourage you to give a little bit more each time.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darshiva View Post
    It sounds to me like you're doing everything right, and that all you need is just a little patience (to quote Axl Rose). Also, pay particular attention to giving your obliques a good long stretch after doing your drills, it will help with the soreness & encourage you to give a little bit more each time.
    Hey Darshiva,

    Yes, practice, practice and patience. Thanks for your advice on the stretching

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    V.I.P. Lydia's Avatar
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    Hi there,, pinky....,,

    please try this exerice this will help you i am sure...i give this exercise to many students that have problems because the muscles in that area are short or a bit stiff...if you do this exercise everyday 2 times like just for 2 minutes it is gonna help you a lot.....there are more way,s to strech your ,,it,, band you can see more video,s and read about it ...please try it you will see in 1 week time you will drop much better....have a nice day Lydia
    Last edited by Lydia; 11-20-2009 at 05:08 AM.

  5. #5
    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lydia dubai View Post
    please try this exerice this will help you i am sure...i give this exercise to many students that have problems because the muscles in that area are short or a bit stiff...if you do this exercise everyday 2 times like just for 2 minutes it is gonna help you a lot.....there are more way,s to strech your ,,it,, band you can see more video,s and read about it ...please try it you will see in 1 week time you will drop much better...
    Actually this exercise, if anything, stretches the IT Band attachments - basically the IT Band doesn't stretch - it isn't muscle.

    If flexibility is an issue it is more likely to be the lateral flexors. In this case you could try:
    • Sit on the floor legs wide, and hips, back, shoulders and head against the wall.
    • Bend one leg so the outside is on the floor and the foot is against your knee. Bend the same arm and place you hand on your head - with your elbow against the wall.
    • Place the other hand on the floor.
    • Keeping everything against the wall, slide your hand away from your body giving yourself a stretch up your side.


    However, isolation is more often an issue of control rather than flexibility. You need to be able to rock your hips up and down without twisting forward and back or pushing out to the side (yes, you can bring your hips staright up, you "just" need to recruit a few more muscles into the act). This takes practice.

    Once you have this, you need to also learn to hip drop recruiting the standing knee and glute - and adjusting when they fire to keep yourself steady. This takes practice.

    So, take it slow - and do it perfectly before adding a layer or speeding up. It should improve with practice - but there are no magic bullets.

  6. #6
    V.I.P. Lydia's Avatar
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    hi Kashsmir....perhaps i said it wrong ...and must say ,,it band .,,area muscles hahaha anyway its a real good thing to do...i hope she will try it because i know it helps....

  7. #7
    Premium Member Aniseteph's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kashmir View Post
    ...However, isolation is more often an issue of control rather than flexibility. You need to be able to rock your hips up and down without twisting forward and back or pushing out to the side ...
    I noticed this when I was a new beginner, especially with hip circles flipping up at the sides. Definitely a control thing, plus a bit of strength.

    I've always been fairly flexible, but I don't think this helped at the time. If you HAVE to start small because you don't have the range of movement maybe it helps keeps you focused on getting the move right and controlled (not huge and HEY LOOK - HIP DROP GOING ON!!!!).

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    V.I.P. jenc's Avatar
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    Are you keeping supported leg softly bent and then dipping that knee slightly when you raise opposite hip? As beginners we often tend to forget that both hips are joined and that in order to go up on one side there needs to be an opposite movement on the other!

  9. #9
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    You ladies are wonderful!!!

    I cannot express to you how much I cherish this advice. I will try the excercises you have recommended.

    I am now keeping my knee softly bent. I wasn't told to do this until I asked specifically about hip drops. So, I guess I am kind of starting from scratch again. I have the basic idea in my head, but now I am keeping knees soft.

    I am veryyy tight to begin with. My teacher has told me I do need to stretch alot, which I am doing every day, so that should definitely help. I'm hoping more muscle control will come in time as I keep practicing. I do think it would help if I do some strength training excercises also.
    Last edited by PinkSugar; 11-20-2009 at 08:34 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenc View Post
    Are you keeping supported leg softly bent and then dipping that knee slightly when you raise opposite hip? As beginners we often tend to forget that both hips are joined and that in order to go up on one side there needs to be an opposite movement on the other!
    Hey!

    I actually just started dipping my knee, and I see better movement. Thank you for that very important piece of advice!

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