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  1. #11
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    Default Maybe it's not...

    Maybe it's not so much that you don't have the strength in your obliques as that you are using the just the obliques to lift your hip. Try incorporating the psoas to push the hip upwards and then release it.
    Last edited by Chandra; 12-27-2009 at 01:45 PM.

  2. #12
    Member Ahimsa's Avatar
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    Despite the fact its called a hip drop 'isolation' every move in belly dance is an 'all body' movement! Check these few points:
    - correct posture;
    - head up, chest lifted;
    - arms and hands framing your body;
    - very important - ensure shoulders remain still - do not bop (this ensures all the work is in the hips and that you do not try to compensate with movement in your upper body)
    - imagine squeezing your hip right up and then dropping it down (whilst keeping upper body still!)
    - keep your knees soft and bent so they can move naturally with the hip movements.
    - to make it easier to achieve movement to start off with lift the heel off the floor, so the ball remains gently resting on the floor for balance. However, once you have managed to achieve the isolation you should be able to do the movement with your feet relatively flat (she says, testing the move out in front of her computer...!!)
    - relax and take it slow! Do not try to rush or make the move big - this is where you start to see bouncy moves and head bopping! Start really small... you will feel it in your muscles, but that is good! It will come with practice...

    Have fun x

  3. #13
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    You need strong core muscles Ohh no, I guess it's more sit ups for me

  4. #14
    Premium Member Aniseteph's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Animallover View Post
    You need strong core muscles Ohh no, I guess it's more sit ups for me
    If you are just starting don't worry about it. Doing the move right and practising a lot will give you the strength and control you need in the right muscles, and be a lot more fun that sit-ups!

  5. #15
    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Animallover View Post
    You need strong core muscles Ohh no, I guess it's more sit ups for me
    Actually situps are not the best way to build core muscles. When most people do situps they actually use their hip flexors which does sweet FA for your core. Mindful belly dance will help - as will good Pilates or Yoga - or a boring program from a sports rehab physiotherapist.

  6. #16
    Moderator Daimona's Avatar
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    Sit-ups are boring. Go for yoga or pilates if the dance itself isn't enough..
    --
    Daim.

  7. #17
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    Belly rolls! Lots and lots of them! Leg lifts are okay. Climbing a pole is the best thing I ever did for core muscles!

    As for the knees, for almost all of your moves, the knees should be soft (slightly bent) to avoid injury.

  8. #18
    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shara View Post
    Belly rolls! Lots and lots of them! Leg lifts are okay.
    Actually belly rolls don't use your core - they tend to be more Rectus Abdominis. Leg lifts can be done with abs - but if your abs are weak you tend to cheat and use those hip flexors again (and if you must do leg lifts - only do one at a time)

  9. #19
    V.I.P. adiemus's Avatar
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    I agree - you're probably best to practice doing the movements you're having trouble with, but doing them slowly, thoughtfully, and watching in the mirror to see that you're doing them correctly.

    If you can't get full range (that is, they're not very big) then you need to continue doing them but extending a little further each week.

    Far better to do correct movement patterns but small ones, than do big movements using incorrect technique.

    Then when you're too tired to practice the movement, try imagining yourself doing the movement (the internal feeling of the movement) and doing it correctly. Even though this sounds weird, it's actually using many of the same neural pathways as you do when you actually physically do the movement. Given that so much of the way we move is not about our muscle strength but is about control, this will help you far more than you realise (and you can do it anywhere!) and you'll find it much easier to 'get' the movements when you go back to actually doing them!

    We use this a lot in the rehabilitation work I do - awesome stuff!

  10. #20
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    Major muscles included are the pelvic floor muscles, transversus abdominis, multifidus, internal and external obliques, rectus abdominis, erector spinae (sacrospinalis) especially the longissimus thoracis, and the diaphragm. Minor core muscles include the latissimus dorsi, gluteus maximus, and trapezius.

    Core Muscles

    The major muscles of your core include:

    Transverse Abdominis (TVA)-The deepest of the abdominal muscles, this lies under the obliques (muscles of your waist). It acts like a weight belt, wrapping around your spine for protection and stability.Target Exercise: Plank
    External Obliques-These muscles are on the side and front of the abdomen, around your waist.Target Exercise: Arm Sweep
    Internal Obliques-These muscles lie under the external obliques, running in the opposite direction.Target Exercise: Crossover Crunch
    Rectus Abdominis-The Rectus Abdominis is a long muscle that extends along the front of the abdomen. This is the 'six-pack' part of the abs that becomes visible with reduced body fat. Target Exercise: Crunch
    Erector Spinae -The erector spinae is actually a collection of three muscles along your neck to your lower back. Target Exercise: Back Extension
    Happy strengthening!

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