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  1. #31
    Member Anthea Kawakib's Avatar
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    Default 7 months!? no way

    It shouldn't take that long! wow -
    my other video was taken down so I did a new one:
    Kawakib Shimmy - How to do 3/4 and regular shimmies - YouTube

    hope that helps, Sirene -

    I think it's REALLY important to (at least!) mention the beat when teaching a step or movement. You need to hook the movement TO the music, obviously. The beat is the easiest way so we begin with that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daimona View Post
    Only seven months? Please don't give up and keep on practicing. One day you'll get it. Promise!

    And I can also promise that if you stop practising after getting it, you may loose it and may need to work hard to get it again. So keep practicing! Ok?

  2. #32
    V.I.P. Yame's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthea Kawakib View Post
    It shouldn't take that long! wow -
    my other video was taken down so I did a new one:
    Kawakib Shimmy - How to do 3/4 and regular shimmies - YouTube

    hope that helps, Sirene -

    I think it's REALLY important to (at least!) mention the beat when teaching a step or movement. You need to hook the movement TO the music, obviously. The beat is the easiest way so we begin with that.
    I know you're trying to be helpful, but it's kind of insulting to tell someone that learning such and such movement "shouldn't take [insert length of time here]."

    First, because different people take different amounts of time to learn different movements. It's perfectly normal for one person to get a movement right away, while someone else might struggle with it for months. Without knowing each person's individual body, strengths, and struggles, you can't judge how long it "should" take them to get a movement down.

    Second, because you don't even know how long she's been practicing this movement in particular. 3/4 shimmies (all their versions) are complex movements which require the ability to do do other basic movements first (hip lifts/drops and hip bumps for example, but it depends on which 3/4 shimmy we are talking about as there are so many of them). Those basic movements need to be drilled into the person's muscle memory and need to be different enough from one another, the person needs to be able to do them in succession without mixing them up, and have the coordination and speed to be able to do them fast enough. It takes different people different amounts of time to be able to get to that point, but this is DEFINITELY not a movement someone is going to just "get" right off the bat without prior belly dance experience.

    Third, because you don't know what their sources are. There are so many movements people call a "3/4 shimmy," and so many different techniques and different ways of explaining. If someone uses one source to learn the movement and then a different source does it way different, it could confuse the student.

    Fourth, because it's discouraging. When we're having difficulty with something, the last thing we want to hear is "wow, you are REALLY having trouble with this, what's wrong with you?" or "wow, I've never seen anyone have so much trouble with this" or "wow, it shouldn't take this long, that's not normal." That's a great way to make someone feel like giving up.

    And lastly, because it's not true. It just isn't. I'm on belly dance boards all the time and 3/4 shimmies are among the most common student topics. People have trouble with them all the time, people who have been dancing from a few months to a few years. And there are so many variations, that you might have one down, or a couple down, but a few others will give you a hard time... and I have seen advanced students and professionals have a hard time with certain kinds of 3/4 shimmies.

  3. #33
    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
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    Another thing to consider is that if the wrong muscle sequence has been drilled for ages you first need to unlearn the bad habits. Correct is more important than fast.

    That's why with my students we do not start with a shimmy - they move at the pace they can maintain doing the movement pattern (in my students case they start stepping with the down/up/down/pause). If people struggle with this slowly - and many do - then how are they going to do it at speed? As muscle memory and ab strength improves they can speed it up - and push it into the non-thinking part of the brain. Then they have the shimmy.

  4. #34
    V.I.P. shiradotnet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PinkSugar View Post
    How? Just how?! I am just getting my basic shimmy down, and although I am concentrating on that whole heartedly, I really cannot grasp how dancers shimmy and walk at the same time.
    There's an article on my web site that talks about how to learn the standard walking shimmy: Dear Shira: How Do I Shimmy and Walk at the Same Time?

    This is how I teach it to my students, and it seems to work for them.

    One key to learning this is to remember that there's more than one kind of standing-still shimmy.

    1. There's the "original" shimmy that is widely done by Turkish, Lebanese, and legendary Egyptian dancers, which consists of wobbling the pelvis.
    2. There's the shimmy that Raqia Hassan made popular. I call it the "Raqia shimmy" because Raqia is the one who popularized it. I've heard other people call it the "knee-driven shimmy", the "straight leg shimmy", or the "Egyptian shimmy", but I think these are all poor names because they are misleading in one way or another.


    There are other types of shimmy too, but these are the most widely-taught at the beginner level and the most widely-used for walking and shimmying at the same time.

    Anyway, #1 is the one I recommend for walking shimmies. I don't recommend #2 for walking shimmies.

    I hope this helps!

  5. #35
    Senior Member Marya's Avatar
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    There are a lot of different walking shimmies as well, and yes I can move my legs and feet forward while doing a fast thigh driven shimmy, it is more for accent than for traveling through space. That is the wonder of dance is there is always more to learn and different ways to put the movements together.

    I learned how to do this from my teacher Aisha Azar in Spokane WA and from watching Egyptian belly dance videos. Dandash is particularity good at layering shimmies over a lot of other movement.

    Marya

  6. #36
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    hiii all....

    i'm newbie here, just sharing my opinion
    shimmies is not easy.... but very beautiful movement. it makes our dance more sweet n interesting to see.
    when learning some movement, especially shimmies, the main point is just be patient.
    base on my experience, when i learn some new movement, i try to move the movement slowly. until i get all of the figure of it.

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