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  1. #31
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    Hemming a circle skirt requires lots of pressing (pressing, NOT ironing!) and tons of patience, but it is do-able, so don't panic. Make sure to keep the hem very narrow, press it into place and pin to take up the ease, then stitch very slowly. This is not a job you are going to whip out in five minutes. Also, before you hem a circle skirt, let it hang for a week or two and shake it out regularly so that the fabric does all the stretching it is going to do before you hem it. I know, I know, you want to wear it NOW! But skirts cut on the bias stretch, and if you hem it immediately, you are likely to discover that the hem becomes uneven within a few wearings.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

  2. #32
    Moderator Amulya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shanazel View Post
    Also, before you hem a circle skirt, let it hang for a week or two and shake it out regularly so that the fabric does all the stretching it is going to do before you hem it. I know, I know, you want to wear it NOW! But skirts cut on the bias stretch, and if you hem it immediately, you are likely to discover that the hem becomes uneven within a few wearings.
    \

    That is the part I hate, you need help for that and it can go wrong.

  3. #33
    Member gwinity's Avatar
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    This is not a job you are going to whip out in five minutes.
    Drat. :p It sounds like it's going to be a lot of work, but it should be worth it. Thanks so much for all the advice.

  4. #34
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    It is rather a lot of work, but none of it is terribly difficult, especially if you have any sewing background at all. I tend to be impatient myself, but once I get into the Zen of the project, I am happy to see it fall into place under my fingers. If you don't have much experience, start out with a skirt made of good rayon or at least something less slippery and finicky than chiffon or silk. If you don't want to wear the plainer skirt for a stage costume, you can use it for practice or even street wear, given the proper fabric and length.

    The other thing I might mention about working with fabric cut on the bias is to be careful not to stretch it out of shape as you stitch. Use a light hand and a foot pressure that doesn't drag at the fabric. I do pretty good on skirts, but fail miserably on the necklines of knit tops. I am working on it, but so far have not achieved anything like a perfect choli for teaching attire.:o
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

  5. #35
    Member gwinity's Avatar
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    It's a good idea to make a practice one - I'll definitely do that. I'm not much of a sewer, however, (I don't have the patience for straight lines!) so it looks like I may (reluctantly) enlist the help of my MiL, at least for the performance skirt.

    I really, really appreciate all the help and advice!

  6. #36
    Member Suhad's Avatar
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    I got a deep emerald green panne velvet halter dress with a slit up the left leg at the thrift store for $2.50 -- I'm making beaded/sequined appliques of fall leaves to put on it along with "branches" to connect the leaves and I also bought small maple leaf-shaped sequins to sew on; I'm getting swarovski crystals that appear green but change to amber and copper depending on the light to sew on as well.

    I'm planning to do an asymmetrical pattern across one breast and down to the opposite hip with the leaves swirling around to the other hip and down the line of the slit. I originally was going to put in some cutouts but I'm too chicken to cut up the dress and possibly screw it up so a "conservative" costume it will be.

    My present dilemma (sp?) is how to put a hard cup halter bra into the dress without having to place a zipper in the back; do you guys think an elastic band with hooks instead of the bra sides might work? I was thinking of leaving a band of velvet fabric across the back with the elastic sewn into (except I would still have to hook it to wear it) and a U shaped cutout down to my waist would work?

  7. #37
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    Can you use one of those convertable bras that form a halter bra with the supporting bands that wrap around your waist? I've never tried one myself, but have seen them in catalogs. You could also try the trick we used to use with leotards- sew in a couple of loops like belt loops into the inside of the back of the dress and slid the back of the bra through them so the dress holds the bra into place.

    I'm not a fan of halter styles- they hurt my neck, and I read on the old forum about a dancer who got a slipped disc from years of wearing a halter style bra. They look nice, though, and maybe work well if the bra is well constructed and the load the cups carry is not overwhelming.
    Last edited by Shanazel; 07-21-2006 at 02:54 PM.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

  8. #38
    Member gwinity's Avatar
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    I bought the fabric for the double-circle skirt and top on the weekend - a dark-green-almost-black, lightweight satin. And my mother-in-law has been volunteered to help.

    We made a mock-up skirt in a lightweight crepe, and it's hanging to get the hemline right, but I have a question about the hemline in a double circle skirt: is it meant to be one even curve all the way around, or is it meant to be "loopy", with the curve from each half-circle longer than the seams?

    I'm looking at modifying a choli pattern to make the top, as I want it fitted with full coverage, and the fabric is non-stretch. What are opinions on leaving the seams open under the arms for movement?

    (I also found some awesome red sueded/embossed snake-print fabric that I think would make a funky bra/belt/bedlah, but I'm waiting until the skirt and top are made first before I get too ambitious!! )

  9. #39
    Moderator Amulya's Avatar
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    I am thinking of making a trumpet skirt.................if I have the courage!

  10. #40
    Senior Member Mouse's Avatar
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    I have just bought a copy of Skirting The Issues (Dawn Devine Brown) so no prizes for guessing what my next project will be

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