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  1. #11
    V.I.P. Aziyade's Avatar
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    Why don't we all go ahead and post what we're involved in, what we're looking at, and our thoughts on the matter? It would be nice to have them all in one big thread.

    In the US, there is Hadia's teacher training, Taj's Bellydance Trainer training, and various "Method" certifications, but I don't really consider those outright teacher training programs (Piper Method, Veda Sereem, Suhaila.) What am I missing? (We also have professional dance 'certifications' from people like Faten Salama and Hadia, but those are focused more on professional qualities rather than teaching.)

    Keti Sharif has A-Z teacher training, which I'm considering, if I ever finish her A-Z personal techniques course! LOL.

  2. #12
    Premium Member Aniseteph's Avatar
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    These are the ones I've heard of in the UK
    JWAAD
    Mia Serra
    Hadassahstars
    ...and now the one in the OP.

    I'm not intending to teach but if I was I would go for JWAAD: I like the approach, it doesn't seem as tied to having done one teacher's courses, a range of tutors are involved, and it has a track record. OK I'm probably a bit biased as my teacher is JWAAD trained, but IMO she is a good advert for them.

    (This is another thread, but I wonder if the ones that are a follow-on to ordinary classes foster the attitude that once you get to a certain level the next step is to start teaching.)

  3. #13
    V.I.P. jenc's Avatar
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    Mia Serra seems to imply that you can take course if you have been dancing for about a year - so not impressed

  4. #14
    V.I.P. lizaj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenc View Post
    Mia Serra seems to imply that you can take course if you have been dancing for about a year - so not impressed
    But you do get a T shirt!

  5. #15
    V.I.P. lizaj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aniseteph View Post
    These are the ones I've heard of in the UK
    JWAAD
    Mia Serra
    Hadassahstars
    ...and now the one in the OP.

    I'm not intending to teach but if I was I would go for JWAAD: I like the approach, it doesn't seem as tied to having done one teacher's courses, a range of tutors are involved, and it has a track record. OK I'm probably a bit biased as my teacher is JWAAD trained, but IMO she is a good advert for them.

    (This is another thread, but I wonder if the ones that are a follow-on to ordinary classes foster the attitude that once you get to a certain level the next step is to start teaching.)

    From Hadassah:

    "To certify you need to:



    * Learn to use all props such as veils, double veils, cane, candles, shamada, wings, swords, flowers, zills;
    "

    I shal have to resign right now. Apart from cane and veil ( single) I have no interest in props and...... flowers..I'm not training to be a florist!
    Last edited by lizaj; 04-08-2010 at 09:15 PM.

  6. #16
    V.I.P. lizaj's Avatar
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    As a teacher teacher (if you catch my drift) I see very little emphasis in many schemes in learning to teach!
    That might mean some practical experience ebfore you get a certificte. I wonder if any scheme has tackled that. I am inspected by my employers for schemes of work,lesson plans, class management because of course they have no idea of content but I wonder if it would be possible to devise a course that was followed up in the craft of teaching.
    Last edited by lizaj; 04-08-2010 at 09:15 PM.

  7. #17
    Premium Member Aniseteph's Avatar
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    That's the bottom line really isn't it? The clue's in the title - TEACHer training. Who cares if you can handle a gazillion props? I'd rather have a teacher who could manage her class and knew five different ways to explain how to do an undulation.

    Aha, but what are they teaching - how to "be a belly dance teacher" or how to teach belly dance... (OK, getting deeeep, starting to confuse myself here now).

  8. #18
    Moderator Darshiva's Avatar
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    Since we're naming names here, I did Shemiran Ibrahim's teacher training. No, it wasn't expert in all the fields that Jane suggested a few posts ago. It was competent and highly educated, but not expert. I didn't expect it to be. I go to my bookkeeper for bookkeeping advice, my osteopath for physiology advice, and so on. If you seriously want something that comprehensive, you should look into doing a degree in physiotherapy, anatomy, osteopathy, nursing, etc at uni. Then doing a community college course in bookkeeping, etc. You get my drift.

    I'd expect a teaching skills workshop from say, AusDance, to cover that, with lectures & demonstrations by physiotherapists, bookkeepers, etc. But what I expect (and got) from teacher training is solid enough foundation that I know what I'm doing.

    Be realistic in your goals. Be honest in your wants. And when you find the teacher training that meets your wants & satisfies your goals, do not faint over the price. After all, you get what you pay for. What you're most likely to get from good teacher training for is a very strong base in this, strong enough that you know what to ask & who to ask and how to do your own research.

    FYI, the teacher training I did with Shemiran is comprehensive and there's an exam at the end. I studied hard for months and came out with a very pleasant 96%. So I call myself a qualified teacher, certified in Egyptian Dance. Because that's what I am and I worked damned hard for it!

  9. #19
    V.I.P. Aziyade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darshiva View Post
    FYI, the teacher training I did with Shemiran is comprehensive and there's an exam at the end. I studied hard for months and came out with a very pleasant 96%. So I call myself a qualified teacher, certified in Egyptian Dance. Because that's what I am and I worked damned hard for it!

    I've seen her course offered and I wondered about it. You can do that as distance-education, can't you? I'm really curious about her program, so if you have any info about content, I'd love to hear it.

  10. #20
    Moderator Daimona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizaj View Post
    As a teacher teacher (if you catch my drift) I see very little emphasis in many schemes in learning to teach!
    I agree.

    In Norway, belly dance teacher training is very new. To my knowledge, there are only one programme for belly dance that is organized within the dance section of the Norwegian Olympic and Paralympic Committee and Confederation of Sports, an umbrella organization for sport in Norway. There are various programmes (latin dances, swing, freestyle, etc). In general there are 4 levels;
    The first level is a 16h intensive course without any prerequisite (in theory you don't even need to know how to dance). Usually you become a teacher assistant at this level, not a "complete teacher".
    The second and third levels (32-60h or more, including relevant experience in teaching dance) has both a practical and written exam. The forth level requires a wide knowledge of several dance types of high quality and means you are on a national of teaching dance.

    The belly dance programme is still on level 1, but, as far as I know, they are working on the curriculum for level 2. Because there aren't any higher leveled programmes yet, the curriculum for level 1 covers both several of the topics that are relevant on level 2 (tools for teaching groups, ethics, music analysis, organizing classes and business aspects, basic anatomy, etc) and different from the other level 1 classes, requires that the participants already know how to dance.


    In Finland, the Masrah Dance Organization has a Teacher Training programme as well.
    --
    Daim.

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