Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15
  1. #11
    Member Pleasant dancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Hampshire, UK
    Posts
    192
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lizaj View Post
    I assume this isn't a college by the way. I find my employer and the previous very responsive. I was Ofsted'd in the last evening college and inspected internally. I walso sent training material and invited to in-house training. I find i don't mind the admin as long as I get the support.
    No it's not a College it's the WEA - very worthy and nice people, but a bit old fashioned in their enrolment procedures; the Colleges I have worked for were fine, and a bit more on the ball - I was always consulted and had students referred to me for a chat before they enrolled if there was the possibility of a problem health-wise etc.

    My lady didn't turn up tonight so I shall wait and see next week. 80 year old returned for 2nd week and is doing very well, she said she had no aches and pains from last week. I wish I could say the same as we are dancing on a concrete, carpet covered floor!

    Now I must go to bed and try to get some sleep whilst husband stays up all night watching paint dry (oh sorry I mean the general election result!)

  2. #12
    V.I.P. da Sage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,024
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pleasant dancer View Post
    They also knew she was hard of hearing as she has attended other courses at the Centre and has additional support for some of these! But no-one thought to mention it to me! I think I need a serious chat with the tutor co-ordinator....

    I have to say I am increasingly inclined not to continue teaching for them, the paperwork and enrolment procedures are really getting to me.....
    But I'll do my best for the student and my sprightly 80 year old who wishes she had taken it up when she was 20!
    If she needs additional support for other classes, they should have definitely consulted with you as to her probable needs for this class.

    I do know a HOH person who didn't sign up for dance classes because she was worried about how she would keep up. She operates in both Deaf and Hearing cultures, so I recommended she go ahead and do it...didn't even think about having her notify the teacher first.

    I just hate to see people miss out on opportunities, when they might actually be able to succeed and shine, y'know? There are lots of dancers out there with significant hearing loss, including one on this forum (although she's been inactive for a while - I've missed you, Australian snake lady!).

    A deaf student (particularly a deaf adult student) does have a right to try your class. Even though she's deaf. She has a right to succeed or fail-the onus is on her to try to keep up. As long as she doesn't disrupt the class, it shouldn't be a problem.

    On the other hand, you have a right to decide how much you will modify your class to accommodate your student's special needs. Having been given no warning, you might choose not to modify it at all. If the student makes a request that you can't fulfill (and she won't accept your way of doing things), or if she dominates class time, you should bring the host organization into the discussion.

    You know what would really bother me? Not being able to understand what the student is saying. It's probably very frustrating for her, too. If failed attempts at conversation are taking up a lot of class time, you may need to get a translator in, encourage very little verbal feedback from ALL students in class (maybe have Q&A after class with the help of a pen and paper?), or (with the help of the host organization) encourage her to drop the class - and I hope that would be a last resort.

    I realize that even Deaf people can be divas, and demand much more than their fair share of attention. Is that the problem with this student, or is it more of a discomfort with the communication problem and being put on the spot?
    Last edited by da Sage; 05-07-2010 at 05:37 AM.

  3. #13
    V.I.P. lizaj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    4,438
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pleasant dancer View Post
    No it's not a College it's the WEA - very worthy and nice people, but a bit old fashioned in their enrolment procedures; the Colleges I have worked for were fine, and a bit more on the ball - I was always consulted and had students referred to me for a chat before they enrolled if there was the possibility of a problem health-wise etc.

    My lady didn't turn up tonight so I shall wait and see next week. 80 year old returned for 2nd week and is doing very well, she said she had no aches and pains from last week. I wish I could say the same as we are dancing on a concrete, carpet covered floor!

    Now I must go to bed and try to get some sleep whilst husband stays up all night watching paint dry (oh sorry I mean the general election result!)
    What! a concrete floor...the good man wept...can't they find you a suitable venue? WEA is big outfit and surely have some sense of what you need.My mum used to work for them and a friend also taught belly dance for some years here on Merseyside.

  4. #14
    Member Pleasant dancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Hampshire, UK
    Posts
    192
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lizaj View Post
    What! a concrete floor...the good man wept...can't they find you a suitable venue? WEA is big outfit and surely have some sense of what you need.My mum used to work for them and a friend also taught belly dance for some years here on Merseyside.
    I think they are trying to make the most out of the facilities they have at the Centre, and I have worked on concrete floors before. I think it just hurts more as I get older! Not good though, I shall need to have a serious chat before/if we plan courses for next academic year.

  5. #15
    Member Pleasant dancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Hampshire, UK
    Posts
    192
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by da Sage View Post
    If she needs additional support for other classes, they should have definitely consulted with you as to her probable needs for this class.
    Absolutely. I think they are a bit in the dark as to how to proceed with a dance class as it's the first time they've offered one at this Centre.



    I just hate to see people miss out on opportunities, when they might actually be able to succeed and shine, y'know? There are lots of dancers out there with significant hearing loss, including one on this forum (although she's been inactive for a while - I've missed you, Australian snake lady!).

    A deaf student (particularly a deaf adult student) does have a right to try your class. Even though she's deaf. She has a right to succeed or fail-the onus is on her to try to keep up. As long as she doesn't disrupt the class, it shouldn't be a problem.

    Totally agree. A bit of warning beforehand and I would have been more prepared, though.

    On the other hand, you have a right to decide how much you will modify your class to accommodate your student's special needs. Having been given no warning, you might choose not to modify it at all. If the student makes a request that you can't fulfill (and she won't accept your way of doing things), or if she dominates class time, you should bring the host organization into the discussion.

    She didn't attend the second class so I don't know how this is going to go yet. I hope she wasn't put off, but think there was probably a genuine reason for the absence, she was very keen.

    You know what would really bother me? Not being able to understand what the student is saying. It's probably very frustrating for her, too. If failed attempts at conversation are taking up a lot of class time, you may need to get a translator in, encourage very little verbal feedback from ALL students in class (maybe have Q&A after class with the help of a pen and paper?), or (with the help of the host organization) encourage her to drop the class - and I hope that would be a last resort.

    Only time will tell here, I had considered this.

    I realize that even Deaf people can be divas, and demand much more than their fair share of attention. Is that the problem with this student, or is it more of a discomfort with the communication problem and being put on the spot?
    As I said in my first post, I have some experience of HOH people and worked with a couple of students so I think it's the case that I realise there could be problem and wish I was consulted first, not put on the spot. She's a lovely lady. We'll see how it goes. Many thanks for your suggestions.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •