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  1. #21
    V.I.P. Greek Bonfire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daimona View Post
    Why can't you have several dance personalities? After all, they are just facets of you whether you think of them as that or different personalities/characters. You just have to choose which parts of your personality you want to show to the audience when you are performing.

    Just for shaabi I've got at least three different stage personas; one of them is cute, fun and flirty (lately it has been inspired by Caroline's happy shaabi) and rather innocent. The other two are the opposite from this one. As I can't be coquettish more than seconds at a time without laughing, it is balancing on the very fine line of being vulgar. How extreme it turns out to be depends on the audience; if they are connoisseurs it canl become rather extreme (and perhaps too vulgar to delicate souls), if not I'm a bit more careful. I'll never do the extreme parts without a context or without a possibility to show off a more serious oriental as well in the same show. The last one is a sidetrack on the extreme side and is rather trashy. This one only occurs in my shaabi group choreography. In this choreography we all have different personalities and besides the trashy one, there are two coquettish divas, one hippie and the last one is cute and adorable and almost childish. Sounds like fun, doesn't it?
    Good point and a great idea.

  2. #22
    Senior Member GypsyStacey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by indrayu View Post
    In my limited prformance experience, I don't think I have a particular dance character or persona. For me, it all comes from the music and is modified by my body's ability. The emotions evoked are my response to the music. Can't imagine that approach changing even with more experience. What can change, though, is my body's ability.

    The last thing that many of us think about is the face; mine usually sets into that "concentrating" look. Not pretty, or evocative of anything an audience is interested in! My teacher recently pointed out that facial expression is another aspect of the awareness and control we work on with our bodies. That helps me lift the seriousness and let the underlying emotion show, just like working on another aspect of technique, say shimmy, to better express a feeling.
    yes of course the face for me is a big thing. & i show everything through my face probably not very different than most people i suspect. i just need focus & listen to the music more KEY & fill my head with thoughts that i love my music, costume, makeup, hair etc.

    i do think that this 'persona' should be just a segment of our own personality. if it wasn't in me to begin with i couldn't do it.

  3. #23
    Moderator Daimona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GypsyStacey View Post
    yes of course the face for me is a big thing. & i show everything through my face probably not very different than most people i suspect. i just need focus & listen to the music more KEY & fill my head with thoughts that i love my music, costume, makeup, hair etc.

    i do think that this 'persona' should be just a segment of our own personality. if it wasn't in me to begin with i couldn't do it.
    That's right. It is difficult to be something you are not, but you can use the stage persona to enhance hidden sides of yourself. I think it may particularly useful for shy or timid dancers.

    Here are some ideas for your next performances:
    At home: Which parts of the music/choreography are introvert/extrovert, happy/sad, etc.? Think of the feeling you will portray.
    Go through the choreography while sitting down, but focus on your face and how you express the music through your face. Are you using your eyes actively by looking at hands/hips etc during the dance? Don't forget your mouth. (It isn't necessary to grin all the time, though..)

    At the venue: If you have the possibility to have some minutes on the stage by yourself before the show starts, take some minutes where you think of the music, the choreography and your facial expressions. Focus on where the audience will be compared to the different parts of your choregraphy and how and when you can communicate with them. Do remember to go through the choreography with your face as well and notice if you need to raise your chin and look up/down etc.
    --
    Daim.

  4. #24
    Senior Member GypsyStacey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daimona View Post
    That's right. It is difficult to be something you are not, but you can use the stage persona to enhance hidden sides of yourself. I think it may particularly useful for shy or timid dancers.

    Here are some ideas for your next performances:
    At home: Which parts of the music/choreography are introvert/extrovert, happy/sad, etc.? Think of the feeling you will portray.
    Go through the choreography while sitting down, but focus on your face and how you express the music through your face. Are you using your eyes actively by looking at hands/hips etc during the dance? Don't forget your mouth. (It isn't necessary to grin all the time, though..)

    At the venue: If you have the possibility to have some minutes on the stage by yourself before the show starts, take some minutes where you think of the music, the choreography and your facial expressions. Focus on where the audience will be compared to the different parts of your choregraphy and how and when you can communicate with them. Do remember to go through the choreography with your face as well and notice if you need to raise your chin and look up/down etc.
    great ideas. i'll work on that tonight & tomorrow morning as i perform tomorow late morning.

  5. #25
    Member LadyFatima's Avatar
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    Cool

    Personally speaking, since I am still a beginner, I have found that my preferred "character persona" while I am performing is on the innocent/playful/flirty side. (Kinda childish I know) but since the music that I practice and perform to is always on the upbeat/joyful side, I figured that it would make sense for my routine to reflect on that.

    The sweet/innocent/playful bit also helps to sort of emphasize to my audience that belly dancing isn't a glorified version of a strip tease. If I look happy and playful and energetic while I'm dancing (and lower my eyes while smiling :-) ) it shows that I'm not trying to seduce or sexually excite my audience. It also helps to get a pleasant reaction from them too, for example, If I smile and laugh while I'm dancing, my audience may smile and laugh in return.

    I'm generally not a smiley/flirty/cutesy person in real life, and in truth I'm really quite the tomboy B-)
    So it's a nice change. . .heeheehee

  6. #26
    Senior Member goddessyasaman's Avatar
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    Congrats on the perfromance, and good luck with the next

    I am myself when I get on stage, though my dance style is all about telling a story with my dance, and the fact that I am a writer would give me much to work with , When I get on stage I command it and bring out my spirit for all to see, but this is how I am in my daily life so I guess I am myself even on stage

  7. #27
    Senior Member LadyLoba's Avatar
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    I don't have a specific character in development for my belly dancing...I just find it brings out real traits. I am more confident and secure when I belly dance.

  8. #28
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    I think facial expressions can make or break a performance. If you look uncomfortable, it's going to make your audience feel uncomfortable. Sometimes I will watch a great dancer who looks pained in the face- like their focusing or they always look down or they have a frozen smile on their face... it takes away from their dancing.

    I think a becoming a character is a great idea- it can help someone overcome shyness/embarassment because it feels less personal. It's like acting. If you feel uncomfortable dancing in front of people, just fake that you're not!

    I've just begun bd and I know exactly who I want to be when I eventually perform! I have my stage name picked out too .

    I like watching dancers who are: happy, playful, coy, relaxed, confident, graceful, sweet, friendly, not shy but not pushy and a bit flirty, a bit sassy...
    Last edited by Belly Love; 03-15-2011 at 08:21 AM.

  9. #29
    Member RayaDancer's Avatar
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    i imagine that every dancer/stage performer has experienced this same problem! in the beginning when you're first starting, you're thinking of so many different things; remembering your choreography, making sure you're not going to bump into anyone or anything, maybe trying to conquer some stage fright... it seems impossible to even consider what your facial expression might be! but as you see, OTHERS do notice!
    i have a suggestion. begin to incorporate face expressions as part of your choreo. RECORD yourself dancing/practicing.... this makes such a huge difference, when you can play it back and see yourself, and see everything that you do, including facial expressions. And practice your facial expressions in the mirror.
    i know some great dancers who have good dance skills but more importantly have STAGE PRESENCE.... and that sets the mood for their whole show!

  10. #30
    Member LilithNoor's Avatar
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    i have a suggestion. begin to incorporate face expressions as part of your choreo
    This is such a good idea. I've seen way too many technically good dancers ruin their perfomances by wearing expressions of sullen concentration whilst staring fixedly at their toes. While a forced smile can be very naff, it's a definite improvement on that, and the more you fake it, the more real it will become.

    I aim for a happy but slightly sultry look when performing, although whether I achieve it is up for debate. I feel super attractive and feminine when I'm dancing, so I try to let that conviction carry out through my facial expression.

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