Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 39
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    424
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Official Costume Making Tips Thread.

    I thought it would be neat to have a thread specifically for giving out tips on costume making.

    Share tips, websites, and anything else you can think of to help people create their own personal dance outfit. This includes general sowing tips for those who aren't accustomed to it.

    I personally don't sew much, and haven't made a costume, but I can try to offer some advice.

    Make sure you have your design perfected before starting. Try to draw it out as best as you can beforehand on paper first to see that it all looks ok.

    Keep in mind how heavy, or light you want it too be. Make sure you have strong enough fabric, and thread to hold everything together.

    Have a lot of extra beads/coins/sequins etc. on hand. You don't want to get close to finishing and realized you underestimated. Better safe than sorry right?

    It also helps to double up your thread when you sow, its makes it twice as strong.

  2. #2
    Moderator Amulya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    7,086
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Good idea for a thread! I don't have anything to add at the moment, but I'll get back here when I can think of some tips and tricks

  3. #3
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Rocky Mountains USA
    Posts
    15,485
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    A note on doubling your thread: this is really not as good an idea as you might think. Doubled thread can lead to tangles that will drive you nuts. Consider using a single strand of heavier thread, run it through beeswax, and iron the beeswax into the thread for stronger thread. This works well for sewing on pretties, but beware of using wax on hems and facings where ironing may cause beeswax to melt onto fabric.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    424
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks Shanazel. Yeah I do get tangles when doubling, but they usually straighten right out. Your idea is better though.

  5. #5
    V.I.P. Jane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    In the mountains of Montana
    Posts
    2,220
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I had a light bulb moment when I realized when you have a lining that is a different color from your outer fabric, you can use a different color thread for the bobbin so both sides of the fabric match your threads. Derp.

    Changing your machine needle is a good idea. They get dull more often than you realize.

    You can save some money by buying cone thread, like sold for a serger pic below, for your sewing machine. Just use something heavy with a vertical pole to hold it upright. Second pic below is way fancy and expensive, but you get the idea. Some vertical paper towel holders work okay. I had a friend rig me a homemade one with a thread guide.




  6. #6
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Rocky Mountains USA
    Posts
    15,485
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Oh, cute idea, Jane!

    I dislike buying thread colors that I may never use again and that don't quite match anyway. As an alternative, I've invested in a full range of gray thread, from almost white to near black. I match the values of thread and fabric: the proper value of gray completely disappears against the colored fabric.

    I've also learned it pays in the long run to buy really good thread. The cheaper varieties such as Coats and Clark are far fuzzier than more expensive brands like Mettler and make a bigger mess of your sewing machines innards. Put a strand of each kind of thread side by side and you'll see what I mean.

    To solve the problem of hemming circle skirts of material that ravels, I invested in very narrow iron on bias tape that I buy in quilting stores when it's on sale. I ironthe tape at the very edge of the right side of the skirt before turning up the hem. It not only keeps the fabric from raveling but makes a very nice guide for a perfect hem.

    Ha! I love this thread. Great idea, Luna.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

  7. #7
    V.I.P. adiemus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,792
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Totally agree with you about buying good quality thread, it's just not worth it to have stuff that breaks and the fluff does get into the machine.

    One of my tips is to draft patterns/designs onto interfacing, especially if I'm going to re-use it - eg for choli tops, belt shapes and so on. This makes the patterns much more durable especially if you've taken time to alter it on a muslin mock-up.

    I've also 'invested' in lots and lots and lots of long glass-headed pins, the type you usually use for quilting. So much easier than short normal pins, and they're easier to find when you drop 'em.

  8. #8
    Member Azrael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    182
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I would give the following tips:

    * Don't think you can "wing it" your first time and just make it up as you go along! It doesn't work and can end up looking terrible! (I should know)

    * Think out your design carefully and how you're going to do it [I'm currently stuck because I didn't think my design through!]

    * If you're unsure, ASK the ladies on the forum! They're very wise and can answer any question (no matter HOW ridiculous it seems to you. )

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    424
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Shanazel - Thanks.

    Azrael - I agree, there are a lot of members here who know their stuff, and are always ready to offer advice.

    * Have some hook, and eye fasteners handy for small costume adjustments. Especially if you get something from a store that's not custom made to your measurements.

  10. #10
    V.I.P. adiemus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,792
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I offer slightly different advice from a couple of you - have an idea in mind when designing your costume, but be prepared to go with the flow as you create it, because sometimes what you have in your head just doesn't work when you make it up. I usually have a reasonable idea in my head of what I'm aiming for, but the finished garment almost NEVER looks like what I intended it to - so be creative and allow yourself to experiment. Provided you have plenty of fabric, the worst that can happen is you'll have to unpick a whole lot and redo them - and I've done THAT a fair few times!
    Oh and I wouldn't be without my duct tape dummy EVER.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •