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  1. #1
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    Default BIG conflict with studio owner

    Deleted for privacy reasons- thanks
    Last edited by Gypsy Lilah; 10-27-2010 at 02:10 AM. Reason: Removed identifying information

  2. #2
    Moderator Farasha Hanem's Avatar
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    First of all, welcome to the forum, Gypsy Lilah, we're very glad to have you here!

    Oh, my, what a terrible situation! I don't have any experience as a bellydance teacher, because I'm still a student (recently started my 4th year). However, it does sound like to me that you're a very responsible teacher who cares that her students do well. My teacher is the same way. Last year, she watched a performance of a dancer who had bellydanced for years, and yet couldn't execute proper snake arms (or any other move). A responsible teacher not only makes sure her students are learning the moves properly for the sake of doing them right, she also makes sure they do them the right way so they don't suffer a serious injury. Doing a move wrong can result in injury! Imagine your studio owner trying to teach your students how to do a backbend!

    Learning choreo after only 5 weeks of lessons, especially when your students aren't ready, is asking too much of your students. Of course, I wouldn't doubt that some of them may be anxious to start on choreo, and some may even be bored of the drills and repetition. But I can't stress enough how important it is to get those basic moves right, and to layer them properly, before moving on.

    Last year, I was given the opportunity to move out of the beginner-immediate class into the regular immediate class. However, I didn't feel ready, because I knew I hadn't gotten the hang of some important moves. I'm very glad of the decision I made to stay back in beginner-immediate.

    I wish I had some really good advice as to how to go about solving your problem, but you seem to be a lady who truly loves both bellydance, and your students, and I can't see you letting them be deluded. Hopefully, the teachers on the forum can give you some advice. I wish you all the best.

  3. #3
    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
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    I think your approach is spot on. I use it myself. However, it doesn't pay much more than expenses (although that does include some nice workshops ) - in my city there is a teacher of a different dance style who pulls in 100-200 students a night, six nights a week. The "dance" they learn is minimal (timing, technique, musicality and correction are non-existent) - but enough drop in and out for "fun" that at $15 a head she makes a nice earner. Sometimes I wonder if I should offer to teach for her.

  4. #4
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    I say keep doing what your doing. Even if someone wants to learn for fun, don't they want to do it correctly???

    Maybe your students will go to the new class and realize that they are not ready...

    Sometimes when people are really eager to learn something, they want to know everything right away (I'm guilty of this too sometimes).

    Isn't it the teachers job to be correcting you? That's the whole point of having a teacher. If students just wanted to copy stuff without knowing if they were doing it right, they could just look at Youtube videos for free!

    If I went to a class where I felt that the teacher was teaching us quantity over quality, I would find another teacher. So while you may be losing some students, you also most likely will be gaining some- who will stick with you longer as well.

  5. #5
    Premium Member Aniseteph's Avatar
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    So you have one week left before your teacher is back, and the studio owner has a) got the regular class down to 2 students (viable?) and b) probably upset the balance of the second class by moving up students who aren't ready. Wow. What is your teacher going to say? I would be absolutely fuming, although from the sound of it she might not be too surprised that the owner has interfered...

    I don't think there's anything you can do apart from having a private word with the students and suggesting they run it past the regular teacher about moving classes because it's not up to you to OK this. It does rather dump it on the regular teacher, but unless you are teaching there regularly, handling the owner's behaviour is her problem, not yours. If you try to put them off the other class and they aren't aware of the owner's ignorance or their own limited abilities it could look like you are the upstart trying to keep them down. <sigh >

    It might be interesting to ask them what they felt about doing things in more depth and with feedback and correction, just for some feedback for your teaching practice. Some might appreciate it, even if they are just doing this for a bit of fun.

  6. #6
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    Just a side question as an student, isn`t their a lot of circulation in the students? For me it would have been so demotivating to be in a class where I cannot follow. So I think I would eventually give up. Perhaps if that is the case, you could use the financial argument, no teacher will want her students to leave..

  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=Farasha Hanem;165143]First of all, welcome to the forum, Gypsy Lilah, we're very glad to have you here!



    Thank you Farasha and hello! )
    Last edited by Gypsy Lilah; 10-27-2010 at 02:12 AM. Reason: Remove identifying info

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kashmir View Post
    I think your approach is spot on. I use it myself. However, it doesn't pay much more than expenses (although that does include some nice workshops ) - in my city there is a teacher of a different dance style who pulls in 100-200 students a night, six nights a week. The "dance" they learn is minimal (timing, technique, musicality and correction are non-existent) - but enough drop in and out for "fun" that at $15 a head she makes a nice earner. Sometimes I wonder if I should offer to teach for her.
    OMG how does she pull so many students???? There must be a mad love for belly dance in NZ. WOW!! You gotta get in on that....hahahaha. It sounds like she is teaching more of a belly exercise class than an actual dance class, which is fine as long as the class KNOWS this....

  9. #9
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    Delete- thanks
    Last edited by Gypsy Lilah; 10-27-2010 at 02:13 AM. Reason: Identifying info removed

  10. #10
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    Deleted thanks
    Last edited by Gypsy Lilah; 10-27-2010 at 02:13 AM. Reason: See above

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