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  1. #31
    V.I.P. Jane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Safran View Post
    And it makes you look like one of those cartoon birds (the ones that live in deserts - can't recall their exact name right now )
    A buzzard If your ears are over your shoulders you should be fine and not look like him

  2. #32
    Junior Member Zanbaka's Avatar
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    I'm a big proponent of honoring the natural curve of the spine and using a neutral pelvis for basic dance posture: a neutral spine, maintaining the natural curves of the spine. No part of the spine should be flat and the upper back should not be arched. This shouldn’t be confused with visualizing space between the vertebrate, length in the spine, and standing tall.

    The problem with instructing students to ‘tuck under’ with the pelvis is that it can be interpreted in so many ways and with degrees of “tuck”. It can be really dangerous if someone is working from a natural, relaxed posture that is already neutral or tucked.

    I emphasize neutral posture (and neutral pelvis) in my approach to teaching. I use the term “Tranquil Triangle”..... Tranquil referring to a sense of neutrality in the pelvis and Triangle referring to the three bony landmarks that create an imaginary triangular plane. The bottom point of the triangle is the pubic symphysis or front side of the pubic bone. The top two points are the anterior superior iliac spines (abbreviated: ASIS), or the points of the hip bones that protrude slightly on the front side of your body.

    The triangular plane that these points make should be vertical and parallel to the mirror if you were standing in the studio… of course feel free to adjust slightly, depending on your own body. You may need to contract the abdominals and tilt the pelvis forward in relation to your everyday, relaxed posture or lengthen the abdominals and tilt the opposite direction to attain this position. Once in this position, try to center the weight of the pelvis evenly over your ankles.

    I’ve often been incorrectly assessed as having a sway back due to developed muscles and ample flesh on my booty, and advised to dance in a bizarre posture that constricted my hip movements (and really put me in a lot of pain days after!). Be sure to measure pelvic placement by the bony landmarks of the Tranquil Triangle, not by the outline of flesh.

    And of course, neutral pelvis works best with other elements of neutral and aligned posture

    Regards,
    ~Zanbaka

  3. #33
    Moderator Darshiva's Avatar
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    I, too, emphasise neutrality & show students how they need to have the maximum possible movement in any direction. I tell them to point their tail bones towards the ground and use the transverse abdominus (with demo of 'it's here!') to get the right posture.

    My biggest loathing is the tendency towards overly deeply bent knees. In my experience it detracts from the elegance of this dance and in my case actively harmed my knees, so I always correct to a soft knee so that (again) there is plenty of room to move in either direction.

    I think so long as you keep the emphasis on neutrality that it doesn't matter what terminology you use, they will understand what they need to do to have safe dance posture.
    Last edited by Darshiva; 11-01-2010 at 12:17 AM. Reason: typos, everywhere I see typos!

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aniseteph View Post
    There was someone in front of me in class arching her lower back and sticking her behind out the other week and IMHO it looked lewd on her too. The teacher spotted it and corrected her.
    Hmmm, how does arching the back look lewd?? Unless she's pushing her butt out so far that she looks like she's trying to sit down...

    What if you have a naturally curved back and a really round butt- that's going to look as if your arching it when your not. I have this, but I also "pop" my butt ever so slightly. I think the S shape looks very attractive on a woman- no more lewd than keeping your shoulders back 'causing your breasts to "pop" out.

    Although I now know it's not proper posture for bd.

    Queen of the "butt pokers" Marisa Miller!!!
    Last edited by Belly Love; 11-01-2010 at 11:23 AM. Reason: picture added

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yame View Post
    I am not an expert by any means, but I think if you are purposely arching your back most of the time, even if you are also engaging your ab muscles so that your belly isn't popping out, you are still shortening your lower back muscles and stretching (and perhaps weakening) your lower ab muscles, thus creating a muscle imbalance. Plus, you could be setting yourself up for back problems later in life.
    Yeah, it's very subtle how I arch my lower back, but sometimes after being out at night (which is when I probably do it to a higher degree) and I come home and sit down and lean forward, it feels really sore and tight.

  6. #36
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    Ok, I think I have got it figured out. Just think neutral! I have a pretty good posture normally, so I think I did overcompensate in bd. And I did practice my posture all summer so it is possible I was still standing correct in the last sessions, stupiddddd me!

    Thank you all for taking the time to put it in sesamy street language, this really helped me forward! If one of you is ever nearby where I live please shout out and there will be a box of chocolates waiting for you!


    This whole thing did make me realize it is really neccesarry to have more then one teacher though, I have to save up to take some workshops soon!

  7. #37
    V.I.P. shiradotnet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greek Bonfire View Post
    I was taught the pelvic tuck too. It's better for your back. What other posture are you aware of? This is news to me.
    My issue with "pelvic tuck" is that those words are ambiguous, and can be interpreted different ways by different people. Some possible interpretations can create problems.

    Some people believe that "tuck" means keeping the abs and glutes rigid. It's hard to do intricate hip work in such a position, but that's what some teachers tell students to do.

    So, I usually use the words, "tailbone heavy" instead of "tuck" to describe what I'm looking for. This enables the abs to retain a level of freedom so they can relax at times, engage at other times. It also keeps the glutes relaxed and avoids the technique problems that can result from keeping them tight.

  8. #38
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    "Tail bone heavy." That's a good term. I'll try it on some of my dancers who have trouble with the "tuck your butt" idea. Thanks, Shira.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

  9. #39
    V.I.P. Greek Bonfire's Avatar
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    Tailbone heavy is a better term. It definitely is ambiguous. When I was told to tuck my pelvis, it was never rigid but relaxed, yet it helped free up my lower back instead of putting pressure on my spine. I found that it was very comfortable for dancing and helped me execute the moves much easier when I was a beginner. Rigidity? I really don't know how that ever fits into this dance.

  10. #40
    Member missanime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farasha Hanem View Post
    I've never been diagnosed, but I suspect that I've had lordosis all my life, and I've never been happy with my "duck butt." Nor do I enjoy all the back pain that has steadily gotten worse over the years. I asked my nurse practitioner last spring if she thought I had lordosis, and she replied, "I don't know." She didn't go on to let me know how I could find out or who to go to, soooooooooooo, yeah. -_-

    Are there exercises that will help improve my posture? I'm terrified of also becoming hump-shouldered like my late maternal grandmother.
    Believe it or not its your stomach muscles that support your lower back So situps is an awsome way to ensure good support and posture (not to mention fabulous abs Lol).


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