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  1. #31
    V.I.P. Reen.Blom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aniseteph View Post
    Some people are ALWAYS in front now.
    LOL I do that a LOT. Unless I'm late Im ALWAYS in the front row. Comes with being a shortie...

  2. #32
    Member Bast's Avatar
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    I love my class and my teacher. She does a lot of the great things that were listed in an earlier post. She even gives us her choreo notes written down which for me is a huge help.

    There is just one little thing....more time to organise costumes would be great. My sewing skills are terrible so I have to get creative with the internet and/or see a dressmaker which takes time, especially if I order something made to measure from overseas.

  3. #33
    V.I.P. Greek Bonfire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Za Linda View Post
    I really like it when my teacher/s

    11) make the class perform the well-practiced choreography, and the teacher/s watch so they can see what sections need to be worked on. (Critique optional!)
    I always found this to be extremely important to receive construction criticism and it was very helpful when we did this in front of the teacher.

  4. #34
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    I have learned how very important it is to not be in front of the class after the choreo is learned. You need to see that your students are not simply "following" you. You need to see that they can all be on the beat. It is also good to practice starting the dance facing different directions so that they are not disoriented when starting without the mirror in front of them. Yes, we teachers really need to step out of line and observe so that we can make corrections, give advice, and point out things that we like. I thought my class had a choreo down pat. I was injured one day and could only "sit teach". I started the music and no one was on beat! Stop! Stop! Stop! We did a clapping out the beat exercise with call out of moves along with it to get everyone on track. Luckily this was done early on!

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ariadne View Post
    That would be really nice.

    A few minutes at the end of class to take notes on what needs to be done before the next class would be invaluable as well.

    I also (like many others) want to know when I am doing something right or wrong. Yes I know it's a large class and I don't want to take the teachers time from the others but consistent feedback is really useful especially since I am so bad at reading faces, I can't guess just by watching your reaction.

    If you have a choreography to teach please have a handout that writes it out completely. I will not be able to remember it at home well enough to practice and I want to use class time to learn new things instead of only practicing something we've already been taught because I don't know what I'm doing.

    Please, please, please prepare me for something new when it comes to performing or a public appearance. I want to know not only what to expect but exactly what will be expected from me. Don't assume I'll figure it out.

    Lastly I am going to say I am grateful for a teacher willing to take someone with my health problems, I am sure it's not as simple as teaching someone in good health. It does mean though that there will be times when everything goes right over my head no matter how hard I try to concentrate. I know it but there is nothing I can do so please be patient, I'll get it later when I'm feeling better.
    I wish this would be done in workshops! I mean, we pay a lot of money to go to them. Why is the choreo not handed out at the beginning of the class? And all teachers should be patient, especially toward those with health problems or injuries. I had a yoga class in a workshop with Deb and she was WONDERFUL in helping me with my individual problem and I appreciated that SO much!

  6. #36
    Premium Member Aniseteph's Avatar
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    Why is the choreo not handed out at the beginning of the class?
    For workshops I suppose the bare bones of it would be useful, but getting the details on paper is a very personal thing - mine has scribbly diagrams, patterns and stick people, yours might have counts and step names. And words aren't necessarily helpful with such unstandardised terminology. The more international you get the worse it gets - add in language issues. I'd rather spend extra time rotating the lines and following the bouncing butt than wait while people consulted their handouts and argued about what this bit means. If you do this upfront in lectures people can end up focused on their handouts rather than the bigger picture of what you are actually trying to get across.

    So I suppose if the teacher is trying to communicate "here's a choreography by X to song Y, off you go and perform/teach it", fair enough. But if she/he is trying to get across her/his way of responding to that music, not so much - the choreography isn't the point. It all depends on the workshop focus.

  7. #37
    Moderator Daimona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aniseteph View Post
    For workshops I suppose the bare bones of it would be useful, but getting the details on paper is a very personal thing - mine has scribbly diagrams, patterns and stick people, yours might have counts and step names.
    This is very true. As soon as the students get their hand on the notes, they'll usually focus on the notes and trying to dechipher the notes instead of learning the moves and musical interpretation. That is why handouts should be given out at the end of or just after the class.

    Another reason teachers don't hand out written notes at the beginning of a course is that the choreography isn't completely finished when the course starts, which allows the teacher to adopt it further to suit the level of the class.

    Some teachers I've had hand out notes on e-mail after classes (preferably the same day or at least the day after). They are mainly the teacher's own keywords, and the students have to fill in the details themselves.

    If I want to remember choreographies, I need to write them down. Previously (i.e. untill I stopped performing other teachers choreographies) I spent a lot of hours getting it all down - from musical analysis to movements, directions etc, focusing on getting every little detail of a choreography correct. Now I prefer to just write down some combinations, if I like them.
    --
    Daim.

  8. #38
    V.I.P. Greek Bonfire's Avatar
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    I think handing out notes is definitely going the extra mile, even if everybody doesn't fully understand it. I found that I remembered the workshop when reading the notes - something you can do only by attending. As far as a weekly class, if a teacher does write down the choreo that is also greatly appreciated by me. Sometimes I do go home and write it down myself, but it has to be fresh in my mind if it's new.

    I don't want to harp too much on these issues because I could never be a teacher, not enough time or patience, so unless I ever actually get the opportunity to become one, I don't want to be too critical unless the issue is too obvious. Teaching is really a hard job even if you love it.

  9. #39
    Member Mariyam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shara View Post
    And all teachers should be patient, especially toward those with health problems or injuries. I had a yoga class in a workshop with Deb and she was WONDERFUL in helping me with my individual problem and I appreciated that SO much!
    I doubt all teachers have sufficient knowledge of health problems/injuries to help you adapt a certain movement to respect the limitations (although I'm sure the vast majority does). In my opinion, all teachers SHOULD have knowledge of body movement mechanics and dance anatomy, but how many teachers out there actually *do* have this knowledge...? (I'm thinking of the 2-weeks wonders of this world)

    Anyway, I hope I haven't ruffled too many feathers

  10. #40
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    Dealing with physical challenges in a dance class is like being a vegetarian at a bar-be-que: you partake of as much of the bounty as you can without taking umbrage over a menu that was not designed with your limitations in mind.

    While I am sympathetic toward physical challenges faced by my students, I don't expect to practice medicine, chiropractic, or physical therapy in the course of my classes. Anyone with specific health and/or movement related problems needs to visit a health care professional before signing up class to make sure belly dance is an appropriate activity for them. Having done so, it would be smart as well as courteous to let the teacher know before the first class (not during) about any modifications the student needs to make.

    In the last three and a half decades, hundreds of students have passed through my classes. I can't always recall who has the bum knees and who has the bone spur on her heel. If we are working on mayas and mayas are hell on your knees, then for Christmas sake, don't do the damned mayas- practice something that does not hurt your knees and when I am making rounds of the room to offer individual assistance, we will deal with modifications or alternate movements for you.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

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