Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    Member gwinity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    350
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Hitting 'the wall'

    Have you ever hit 'the wall' ? You know, that point where your head wants to dance but your muscles simply won't respond? How have you overcome it? Did you take a break, or did you fight through it?

    The last couple of weeks in class I've lost all co-ordination and my shimmies (which I was quite pleased with) aren't happening at all. Most upsetting. It's summer break now, and I want to be fit for next term - How can I keep dancing when I want to dance, but my body won't!

  2. #2
    V.I.P. Yasmine Bint Al Nubia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Akron, Ohio
    Posts
    1,160
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Let it go girl. Your body is telling you something so take the time to listen. Maybe you can involve yourself in other activites until the motivation returns.
    Yasmine

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    10
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Not sure if i know what you mean but....

    do you have a mental block?? if so you will eventually over come it...sadly i get mental blocks all the time(being in so many challenging athletics) but i find if i try not to think about it so much and possibly take a small brake(by small brake i mean a week or so) my body will obey me agian what ever you do, dont give up!!!

  4. #4
    Senior Member Mouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    548
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I came across the same sort of thing recently. In my case I think it was just physical tiredness/exhaustion. I'd been pushing myself fairly hard and I think my body just decided enough was enough and started to rebell. My arms were like lead (snake arms became floppy wavy things), I was less fluid and I was having to push myself through even the simplest movements. I didn't stop dancing, but backed off the hours I was doing and made a point of eating right and getting enough sleep (something I don't normally do). It took me about a week, but things did go back to normal

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    317
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    It varies. Sometimes I have to leave it alone for awhile and sometimes I just spaz through it. I think the difference is if the frustration level is growing it's time to leave it for a bit.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    This has definitely happened to me a few times in the past. I've found that at certain points before I can progress and improve I tend to go through a period of frustration. Then all of a sudden I "get" it and I can't understand what my problem was. In that case, thinking back, it was almost like I had to just let go of it and just let it happen and then it worked.

  7. #7
    Moderator Safran's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Dubai, UAE
    Posts
    2,297
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I agree with others, Qwinity... Sometimes your body just needs to take a break. Take a week or so off dancing, that won't be too destructive to staying in "shape". And then, start again slowly to see how your body responds and then gradually build up to your regular routine.

    If you feel like missing a week of dancing would be such a loss (I know how it feels ) then try to compensate it with other things instead - catch up on reading and researching about something dance-related, watch videos etc. You can also take the time to think about what you want to achieve next in your dancing (this idea is fully inspired by Aziyade's structural approach to home practising she presented here ). If you still feel like doing something physical, go for a long walk in the nature... or even better, go swimming. Swimming always does miracles for me.

    I am sure you'll come through it just fine and your shimmies will be back in no time!

  8. #8
    Senior Member Gia al Qamar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Northern NJ New Jersey
    Posts
    722
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Your body needs to be acknowledged. After you've rested and replenished...turn on OTHER music...not Middle Eastern...something totally off the beaten path that you love.
    And dance.
    Then rest some more.
    Then return to what you crave...
    Gia

  9. #9
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Rocky Mountains USA
    Posts
    15,402
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    In children, there is a phenomenon called equilibrium/disequilibrium. When a child is learning a new skill, such as walking, the child is in a state of disequilibrium, struggling to learn, with all the frustrations and discomfort that goes along with growth. Once the skill is achieved, the child enters a period of equilibrium, which is relatively comfortable (and in the case of my children, their dispositions improved). The equilibrium lasts about six months, at which point the next level of learning begins and it's disequilibrium and temper tantrums all over again.

    I have noticed in myself that though the time periods are longer than six months, I still go through periods of equilibrium/disequilibrium whether I am writing, dancing, doing art, or just struggling with my less attractive personality traits. I think hitting the wall is just a way of settling in for your next big leap in skill and knowledge, and the hints given by others here are excellent ways of preparing for the leap.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

  10. #10
    V.I.P. Kharmine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Foot of the Rocky Mountains
    Posts
    1,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I've experienced this when I'm tired and feel like I'm in a rut -- the things I simply did automatically suddenly seem clumsy and take more focus. One reason I've found for this occasionally is a lack of iron, or not enough consistent sleep quality.

    If you haven't had a general medical checkup in a couple of years, you might consider getting one. Some problems only show subtle symptoms that are hard to pin down. I had a boyfriend who was young and healthy but suddenly started experiencing problems with balance -- turned out he had an ear infection that didn't give him any pain but was affecting him otherwise.

    And if nothing else, get a massage. It'll help undo any kinks, physically and mentally.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •