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  1. #1
    Senior Member goddessyasaman's Avatar
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    Default I'm going back into teaching

    Hey Ladys I just had to share that I am going back into teaching in Aug this year, I took off since Dec2010...I miss it so much so now I need to get all my workshops and class setup together again, when I was teaching I made it very easy and I always had great results with my students so i believe in my teaching a lot,

    so I wanted to ask, what kind of work shops do you ladys look for as begginers, intermidate and advance dancers. This will help me think of some to do just incase I miss anything, and what moves do you have issues with or which parts of this dance would you like to see a work shop about?

  2. #2
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    Default As a beginner...

    I am taking a BD class right now, with students of varying levels of experience. As one of the least experienced students, I frequently find myself struggling with the basic moves that most of the others know and have concluded that I need additional help. I would JUMP at the chance to take workshops on beginning BD moves, with focus on exactly HOW the moves are made. I'm finding that my small library of videos and YouTube are a HUGE help in learning basic moves but it's nice having some critique and tips on how to make the moves properly. Also, information on how to design a practice schedule.

    Many years ago I took a few belly dance classes at a studio. For one of the classes, one of the Belly Dance Super Star dancers was the guest teacher and she taught the entire hour on undulations. The funny part was, I was having a lot of trouble grasping the basics of belly dance movement (just like I've been having this time around) but this teacher broke down the move muscle by muscle, then while we were practicing she went to every student to evaluate and suggest improvements. By the end of the class I was able to do a half-way decent undulation which until recently was the only move I could with any proficiency.

  3. #3
    Senior Member goddessyasaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MariaAZ View Post
    I am taking a BD class right now, with students of varying levels of experience. As one of the least experienced students, I frequently find myself struggling with the basic moves that most of the others know and have concluded that I need additional help. I would JUMP at the chance to take workshops on beginning BD moves, with focus on exactly HOW the moves are made. I'm finding that my small library of videos and YouTube are a HUGE help in learning basic moves but it's nice having some critique and tips on how to make the moves properly. Also, information on how to design a practice schedule.

    Many years ago I took a few belly dance classes at a studio. For one of the classes, one of the Belly Dance Super Star dancers was the guest teacher and she taught the entire hour on undulations. The funny part was, I was having a lot of trouble grasping the basics of belly dance movement (just like I've been having this time around) but this teacher broke down the move muscle by muscle, then while we were practicing she went to every student to evaluate and suggest improvements. By the end of the class I was able to do a half-way decent undulation which until recently was the only move I could with any proficiency.
    Yes this is the best way to teach I think, this is in
    part how I teach and it worked very well. Also i like the idea of how to design a practice schedule, thanks for the ideas on that and good luck with you training

  4. #4
    Moderator Farasha Hanem's Avatar
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    First, congrats on going back into teaching! You must be very excited.

    Workshops on basic moves is a wonderful idea---I could use one of those! I'd also like to see workshops on bellydance history, music theory, zills, and how to improv, among others I can't think of right now.

  5. #5
    Senior Member goddessyasaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farasha Hanem View Post
    First, congrats on going back into teaching! You must be very excited.

    Workshops on basic moves is a wonderful idea---I could use one of those! I'd also like to see workshops on bellydance history, music theory, zills, and how to improv, among others I can't think of right now.
    Thank you I am and all those are great ideas, when i taught before I could not get many days to teach how I wanted to so my workshops and classes sometimes mixed together, which was a pain with only 1-2 hr classes twice a week but now that I have more room and time I can do it how I want, Yes I would love to do a workshop just on the history of belly dance I had planned on it, thanks Farasha for the great ideas and what you would like, this feed back will help

  6. #6
    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
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    Default Past beginner

    I don't go to workshops for "moves" any more. If I have issues with technique I do a private class. I attend workshops that can give me insight into musical interpretation - especially from an Arab prespective - and workshops on accurate and documented folklore (including Reda style). Not interested in fakelore. I also attend lecture and culture workshops and lectures.

  7. #7
    V.I.P. Jane's Avatar
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    I have to agree with Kashmir. After a certain point, dance becomes less physical and more of a mental focus. Workshops become focused on lecture and demo rather than "movement" based. It depends on the student level.

  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goddessyasaman View Post
    Hey Ladys I just had to share that I am going back into teaching in Aug this year, I took off since Dec2010...I miss it so much so now I need to get all my workshops and class setup together again, when I was teaching I made it very easy and I always had great results with my students so i believe in my teaching a lot,

    so I wanted to ask, what kind of work shops do you ladys look for as begginers, intermidate and advance dancers. This will help me think of some to do just incase I miss anything, and what moves do you have issues with or which parts of this dance would you like to see a work shop about?
    Yes, I also would love to see a workshop on BD history. When I first started dancing I didn't know what the heck fusion or tribal was. I didn't know the difference between American BD and Oriental styles....I would have very much appreciated this.

    It seems that most younger teachers these days like to focus on adding new twists and cultivating an individual style. I see no problem w/this except if you are someone starting out and don't have a good foundation about the basics. I had no idea how to differentiate between more traditional, basic moves, and more "newfangled" moves. Make sense? And, come to find out I never would've learned the history or tradition had I not realized a few years into instruction w/my one teacher that she's very modern and does not like to focus so much on some of the styles I'd love to learn (i.e., beledi, etc.).

  9. #9
    Senior Member goddessyasaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by astro_girl View Post
    Yes, I also would love to see a workshop on BD history. When I first started dancing I didn't know what the heck fusion or tribal was. I didn't know the difference between American BD and Oriental styles....I would have very much appreciated this.

    It seems that most younger teachers these days like to focus on adding new twists and cultivating an individual style. I see no problem w/this except if you are someone starting out and don't have a good foundation about the basics. I had no idea how to differentiate between more traditional, basic moves, and more "newfangled" moves. Make sense? And, come to find out I never would've learned the history or tradition had I not realized a few years into instruction w/my one teacher that she's very modern and does not like to focus so much on some of the styles I'd love to learn (i.e., beledi, etc.).

    Yes I have talked about this before on this forum, I do dance fusion styles as well but I teach my students the non fusion styles first if the are taking fusion style with me. So I teach them as a base Turkish and Baladi, then is they want to take my fusion lessons after training in one of these then thats fine. Yes I was going to do a workshop on the histroy of belly dance, one for music to start with, I am one for learning everything you can so I want my students to get the training that they should.

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