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Thread: Turkish style

  1. #61
    V.I.P. Moon's Avatar
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    What's the basic step pattern of the dance? I learned something like on step forward, step with other foot on same place, one step back, step on same place and some little jump. (I won't try to describe the rest cause it's har to describe, lol)

  2. #62
    Member steffib's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasmine Bint Al Nubia View Post
    But aside from the moves(as we both agree), Turkish music is the foundation of the dance style with the 9/8 rhythms being predominately heard. In fact most of Turkish style most dancers choose the either karshlimar or chiftetelli rhythm.
    Just to make sure that there is no misunderstanding - there is a lot of Turkish music that isn't in a 9/8 - Siseler, Saskin, Fire Dance, Uskudara, Salla Salla, Istemem Babadjim, Hicaz Dolap, just to name a few of the better known songs in 4 and 2 measures. (And, then there are the lovely 7s, as in Hicaz Mandira.)

    Of course, there is always discussion where songs come from - many countries claim Uskudara - I highly recommend the documentary "Whose song is it". (Arabs call Saskin Ya Ein Muyy??????)

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    V.I.P. Yasmine Bint Al Nubia's Avatar
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    Hi Moon, Do you mean the Turkish Rock Step? Form your description it lIt almost sounds like it. This how my teachers taught it:
    Step forward right foot lean weight into it, then rock back on left foot(you don't have to step backward with it because the right foot is already positioned in front of it). Bring the left foot in front of the right at his point you can add a small hop to bring it forward, lean your weight now into the forward left foot and then rock back on to the right foot. You can stay in place or move forward. Incidentally, Nourhan Sharif describes the basic forward and back step as the kasrhlimar in her Beginners video!
    Yasmine

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    Quote Originally Posted by steffib View Post
    Just to make sure that there is no misunderstanding - there is a lot of Turkish music that isn't in a 9/8 - Siseler, Saskin, Fire Dance, Uskudara, Salla Salla, Istemem Babadjim, Hicaz Dolap, just to name a few of the better known songs in 4 and 2 measures. (And, then there are the lovely 7s, as in Hicaz Mandira.)

    Of course, there is always discussion where songs come from - many countries claim Uskudara - I highly recommend the documentary "Whose song is it". (Arabs call Saskin Ya Ein Muyy??????)
    I agree, but for many of us Turkish music and dance style isn't very familiar to us. So thanks for the info! I'm so glad we are exploring the Turkish style again! Yasmine

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    Member steffib's Avatar
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    Actually, it seems to me that Turkish music is alive and kicking - at Rakkasah East, I heard the live bands play a lot of Turkish tunes. And the legendary Eddie Kochak even took the stage! His Night at the Casbah album is a wonderful collection of classic tunes, highly recommended.

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    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Karsilama

    Dear Group,
    Turkish music has been alive and well as long as I have been dancing, which is since 1974. Middle Eastern dance seems to go through phases in America, where one style is the predominant thing. Right now, Turkish is on the upswing. In five years it will be something else.
    I started learning Turkish dance shortly after I started dancing, but it is only in the last 6-7 years that I have found people who really seem to have a depth of understanding about Turkish dance. I feel that now I can be a serious student of Turkish dance, where before, I could not seem to find any people who were truly knowledgeable. I learned a mish mosh of stuff, like the girl on the video...It made me unhappy so I quit trying to study the dance in any depth. Now I am studying Turkish Roman and Oriental Tanzi again!
    Regards,
    A'isha

  7. #67
    V.I.P. Moon's Avatar
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    What I learned about Turkish roman dance was like 3 categories. Steps, movements where you kind of hit yourself with for example your fists, and household-like movements from everyday life.
    I haven't seen any videos so far where they do the last category though.

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    V.I.P. chryssanthi sahar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moon View Post
    What I learned about Turkish roman dance was like 3 categories. Steps, movements where you kind of hit yourself with for example your fists, and household-like movements from everyday life.
    I haven't seen any videos so far where they do the last category though.
    I think once again we have quite a confusion of terms. And there seem to be a confusion of terms even among the Turks. I recently visited a workshop from a Turkish instructor (Serkan, who lives in Belgium)about Turkish Roman Sulukule dance. The steps we danced were involving pelvis and hips, but they were jumped at the same time. And we danced on 9/8 music. But he didn't call what he was showing us "Karsilama". He called it Sulukule Roma Dances.
    Then again I find this video of a Turkish dancer on youtube and it looks different from what Serkan showed, but for my feeling very authentic (I've seen very many Turkish poeple dancing, since I've danced at innumerable Turkish events and I have also visited night clubs in Istanbul). So I don't know now, if this is supposed to be Karsilama (since the dancer dances on 9/8 music), or if it is Oryental (Göbek Dans). I'd like to hear other opinions on the matter, especially from our Turkish style experts
    By the way, the household-like movements belong rather to folk dances, as far as I know.

    Here is the video (I'll put only the link)
    YouTube - oryantal star

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    V.I.P. Yasmine Bint Al Nubia's Avatar
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    Default Need Turkish Experts

    Hey would it be rude to invite Eva Cernik or Artemis Mourat to join the forum?
    Yasmine

  10. #70
    Member Kiraze's Avatar
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    Default Karsilama rhythm vs. karsilama dance

    Finally I managed to check those YouTube clips and of that "American karsilama" I would say that it represents quite typical "gypsy fantasy" that has lots of gestures that really are used in Roman Havasi i.e. some hand gestures and that fun rocking upward pelvic movement that Turks call göbek atmak (toss a belly) what is also a name with what Turks often call belly dance. Dance was quite cute but maybe it lacked some true feeling and there was too much skirt swirling, which in fact really is not very widely used in Turkish Rom dances (and traditional Rom women in fact do not show their legs) and I would consider that more influenced by Flamenco or Russian/Hungarian dances

    Overall I would also like to emphasize that using karsilama rhythm in Turkish belly dance is not in fact very widely used - according to Aunt Rocky that was added as a speciality to the end of the show by a dancer named Semra during 50´s (sorry, cannot recall the exact quote) and using karsilama in Turkish belly dance could be thought to be similar as using saidi in Egyptian belly dance: it gives some nice spice to the performance but origin of that part itself in fact is *not* belly dance and biggest part of the dance show uses ciftetelli and also similar rhythms that are used in Egyptian belly dance.

    It is somehow confusing that talking about Turkish style belly dance it mostly is about karsilama rhythm - it is also understandable as that is very easy to recognize and it is ditinctive to Turkey (and Greece) and cannot be found in Arab world... And well, I seem to repeat myself, karsilama dance is folk dance (dance by pairs, face to face where the name also comes) that does not have much anything to do either with gypsy dances or with belly dance

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