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Thread: Turkish style

  1. #81
    V.I.P. Yasmine Bint Al Nubia's Avatar
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    Hey Welcome and thanks for the information. Accurate info is so hard to come by .
    Yasmine

  2. #82
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Turkish dance

    Dear Ahmet,
    Thank you for the good info and welcome to the forum.
    Regards,
    A'isha

  3. #83
    Member Kiraze's Avatar
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    Default We cannot forget the golden oldies

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsy ahmet View Post
    As Roman music you are mentioning rampi rampi but this is a very old example. Nowadays, no one dances with this music. There are alot of contemporary gypsy music.
    Welcome to forum Ahmet! it is good to get a viewpoint from a person who really *is* Turkish and sees things sometimes differently

    However to say that no one dances with Rampi rampi is like saying that no one dances belly dance with Aziza or Inta Omri etc... that music is classic karsilama song and it needs still to be recognized and valued - even though there is lots of great contemporary music the old classics should never be forgotten (even if that means that us westerners are the ones that mostly treasure those golden oldies). And especially in the US and Germany for 2nd or 3rd generation Greek, Turk and even Armenian people these oldies are the ones that brings back the memories of the old mother land somewhere out there so also for that reason songs like Rampi rampi are important part of the repertoire of Turkish style dancers.

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsy ahmet View Post
    There people around giving gypsy dance lessons after taking 2-3 lessons themselves. Because of such people turkish gypsy dance is not thought properly. I hope those true lovers of dance are more selective from now on
    Those teachers and dancers we have discussed here are definately the ones who "know their stuff" - maybe there can be some confusion about the terminology and maybe some of the style taught in West seems to be old fashioned or has changed during the years but it still mostly is good... and to get even some lessons of any kind of Turkish style is so rare that when some one is passionate about it then one cannot be too selective... hopefully there will come a day when Turkish style is as valued and as common as Egyptian so there would be much more selection to choose from.

  4. #84
    V.I.P. Tarik Sultan's Avatar
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  5. #85
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    Oh Super Fun!!! That's the kind of pure joy and abandonment I wish we could always bring to the dance and ummmm, about those two guys in the second, I have never seen such fast crisp shoulder shimmies *WoW*

  6. #86
    Junior Member Cerice Janan's Avatar
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    Default New article from Artemis

    Elizabeth Artemis Mourat has just published a new article on Turkish Oriental Dance.

    Here is the link: What is Turkish dance?

  7. #87
    V.I.P. chryssanthi sahar's Avatar
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    The Kocheks (did I write it right?) were really great

  8. #88
    V.I.P. Yasmine Bint Al Nubia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerice Janan View Post
    Elizabeth Artemis Mourat has just published a new article on Turkish Oriental Dance.

    Here is the link: What is Turkish dance?
    Thanks Cerise Janan, Thanks for posting the link. I just Artemis' article and she is truly a gifted and intelligent woman. I can't wait foe her book to be published. Even if one isn't interested in Turkish style, it doesn't hurt to learn the dance from such a foremost authority.
    Thanks
    Yasmine

  9. #89
    Member Kiraze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabi View Post
    Oh Super Fun!!! That's the kind of pure joy and abandonment I wish we could always bring to the dance and ummmm, about those two guys in the second, I have never seen such fast crisp shoulder shimmies *WoW*
    This is the style most of the Turks dance in central Turkey (Ankara & Yozgat especially) - I like this music/dance style called Misket as it is so relaxed but at least those ladies on the clips did not show much joy in their dance... obviously those clips were from some Pavyon in Ankara and well to say it nicely those ladies are working there and not as dancers (about role of the köceks I am not so sure)... and Pavyons in Turkey are definately not the places where western visitors should go (at least not without local company)

  10. #90
    V.I.P. Tarik Sultan's Avatar
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    So the dance style with the spoons or zills where they are doing that basic side step is called misket? I wondered what it was called. Its very simple, but I love it, makes me want to join in the fun

    The Kocheck stuff is interesting. There are tons of clips on youtube. I remember when people were saying no such thing existed any more, now they've resurfaced all over the place. I've noticed there are differences. some of them dance to davul and Zurna music, (some times the fiddle also) only, some use claranet and jumbush, (banjo), some of them dance to saz, and darbuka.

    There are also costume differences, some wear a narrow skirt with a scarf that they flip a lot, some wear the really full skirts with a folded hankerchief, others wear rows of pompoms in the front. I don't know if these differences are regional or the taste of individual groups. Ankara style seems to be the most vigerous and comical.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIV9Yi8fUL0 : location unknown

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqgNa_QhdRE : Location?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZIhoT5Rgec : Location?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAQ3nL0h3NE : Ankara

    Can anyone shed some light on these clips?

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