Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    V.I.P. Aziyade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Cornfields of Evansville Indiana.
    Posts
    2,743
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default What do you do when your teacher is wrong?

    Spin off from the "Gypsy" thread:

    So your teacher is telling you something that is either extremely controversial, or you know is downright wrong. How do you address this without appearing like a know-it-all jerk? Or do you? Obviously you don't want to say, "You're WRONG" in the middle of class, but do you take her aside privately or do you just stay mute out of respect? If you stay mute, aren't you just contributing to the spread of disinformation?

    For instance, and this is an extremely minor issue, I have heard a well-known teacher describe silk veils as being 10 "millimeter" silk. Silk is measured in units called mommes -- usually pronounced "mommies" and abbreviated "mm." I see her confusion, but should I correct her? Is it my business to do so?

    What if she gives the class information that can be considered terribly offensive by the cultures involved? I can overlook a mispronunciation, but what if the statement is just patently wrong and arguably offensive? What then?

  2. #2
    Member mahsati_janan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Asheville, NC, USA
    Posts
    262
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I would probably voice it in the 'ask for clarification' way with a time delay to give the teacher time to process it.

    So for something that was a sensitive issue, I'd say something like, *raises hand* "While we are on this topic, I had heard something xyz on the internet and wanted to get your thoughts on it. I don't want to take up the class time, but is there a better time I can talk with you to find out more about resources on xyz that you feel are credible?"

    For something more simple, like silk weights, I would probably just say it more openly, *raises hand* "I read that silk weights are usually measured in mommes. Is that the same thing?"

    I think that most people tend to be more open and less confrontational about their beliefs when something is asked as a question, especially when the asker is also staying open to the answer.

    Being open to the answer is key. I have heard a story of a student 'correcting' a master workshop instructor from Egypt about 'what they do in Egypt.' I would find that incredibly frustrating as both a teacher and a student, so I would always recommend phrasing it as a question and being open to hear the teacher's response.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator gisela's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    4,624
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I agree with Mahsati that in a question form it is usually fine.
    I have encountered it a few times. It depends on the situation if I say anything but I prefer to speak up in a polite way. One of my teachers once mixed up some instruments and said that the rababa was a wind instrument. I said with a confused look that I had always thought it was a string instrument and isn't that the one they play on their lap or up in the air etc. The next class she said that, yes, oops she had mixed them up in her head.

  4. #4
    V.I.P. Greek Bonfire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Chitown, USA
    Posts
    2,207
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I agree with Mahsati and Gisela. When I've been confronted with this, for example, let's say the teacher used the word "ummies" and I always heard the word "omis" I would ask the teacher what is the difference so she would think I wasn't correcting her, just asking for her knowledge on both. But I like to be careful what I ask; in fact, I've sent an e-mail to my instructor the next day on something I disagree with using the same style as I stated before, just in case they may be a little sensitive (which some of them are extremely so).

  5. #5
    Senior Member walladah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Greece
    Posts
    727
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default You just learn the things which are right

    or those only you agree with!

    At the end, even if one is sure about her teacher being wrong about something, there is no reason to disagree if this does not affect one's education. Particularly, you should not counter-teach the other students esp. during the lesson. THis is bad manners...

    Personally, i have attended classes and workshops with several teachers that if they met together, they would fight with each other. However, all of them taught me great things and i think that no matter the choices i made concerning each specific issue, they have all been great teachers anyway!
    Last edited by walladah; 04-09-2011 at 06:26 PM.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator gisela's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    4,624
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I still think it is a good idea to speak up. It COULD be that you are the one who is wrong and if you ask "but... isn't it like this?" you might find ut that what you "knew" was not correct or just half the truth.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    710
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gisela View Post
    I still think it is a good idea to speak up. It COULD be that you are the one who is wrong and if you ask "but... isn't it like this?" you might find ut that what you "knew" was not correct or just half the truth.
    I agree.

    Even if you know for sure it's something she is wrong about, I also think it's best to pull her aside after class and mention it. Like others said, you could phrase it like a question or say it like, "I think it may be this or that" vs. "Don't you know that..." Saying it in a concerned or lighthearted way is important too so they don't feel like they are being put down.

    I think this is a good subject to bring up as I'm sure a lot of people run into this issue, even in non-belly dance classes.

  8. #8
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Rocky Mountains USA
    Posts
    15,414
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    My students are so fortunate to have a teacher who is never wrong.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

  9. #9
    Member LilithNoor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Worcestershire UK
    Posts
    268
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shanazel View Post
    My students are so fortunate to have a teacher who is never wrong.
    Heehee!

    I've never noticed my teacher getting anything wrong apart from the odd bit of choreo- we spent about ten minutes the other night debating on the direction of a shoulder roll- but I have no doubt she'd be open to correction if someone did notice something.

    I think some teachers do labour under the belief that they have to be omniscient or their students won't respect them. Me, I can't think of anything less likely to inspire respect than someone who clings to ill-formed beliefs!

  10. #10
    Moderator Farasha Hanem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    In the heartland of the USA
    Posts
    4,805
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    If you, your classmates, and your teacher all have Facebook pages, is it all right to post links to articles and info, saying something like, "I ran into something very interesting about XYZ. What are everyone's thoughts on the subject"?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •