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  1. #31
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    Default Let me see

    Belly Love, you are about 16 years old and are desperately wanting to be taken seriously as someone with an opinion so you come on to these forums. PLeeeeaaaassssee child, grow-up or go help your mom around the house or do some homework!


    Quote Originally Posted by Belly Love View Post
    When you make statements like this against a whole country/continent, you sound ignorant.

    First off, the current U.S. society is relatively new. We don't have centuries of customs and arts like other cultures do. We are a melting pot and have a vast mix of arts, which over time, become changed and turn into new arts. It has nothing to do with Americans not knowing what they are doing. Anytime you mix many different cultures, things like arts & customs will change over time. That's just how it is.



    I don't agree. I think it's mostly one's culture/environment that causes this.

    Example: Most white US citizens do not grow up in households where forms of dance music is constantly played. A great percentage of African American US citizens grow up in households that play some form of dance music on a regular basis. This type of music encourages dancing and this starts at a young age when one easily learns things like rythm.



    What is the deal with you saying "whitey" and "colored" when referring to people? Are you not aware that these are derogatory terms and totally innapropriate to use?



    If they are outside the entertainment industry, you are probably not seeing them. I go-go/club danced for years and almost all of the women I worked with were white and we were all good dancers. I am actually a great dancer, have always had rythm and I'm mostly white. I think I have good rythm, 'cause at a young age I started teaching myself to dance. When one learns something at a young age, it usually stays with you forever. It's harder to learn things when you are older.

    Anyway, whites not having good rythm goes back to what I said earlier- dance and dance music isn't something that most white people grow up with in their households, so rythm isn't instilled in them at a young age.



    WTF?

    I can't stand when people are overly pc, but this is nowhere near it. You keep making racial slurs over and over! You have no problem being prejudice against African people? WHAT?! Do you even know what you are saying? In the same sentence you say it's okay to be prejudice and then you say it's not good to make racial assumptions... they are the same thing. OMG.

  2. #32
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    I think what she meant was that where she's from nobody harbours prejudice against people of African descent. As I say...remarkable.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttercup View Post
    Belly Love, you are about 16 years old and are desperately wanting to be taken seriously as someone with an opinion so you come on to these forums. PLeeeeaaaassssee child, grow-up or go help your mom around the house or do some homework!
    I cannot stop laughing


    1- Educate yourself.
    2- Immaturity does not flatter you.
    3- Thanks for the laugh!

    Quote Originally Posted by SidraK View Post
    I think what she meant was that where she's from nobody harbours prejudice against people of African descent.
    Oh, I get it. With all of the racial slurs being tossed around I took it the other way.
    Last edited by Belly Love; 05-12-2011 at 06:39 PM.

  4. #34
    Premium Member Aniseteph's Avatar
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    <arguments deleted, so much WTFery I don't know where to start>

    OTOH I have a creeping sense of disappointment that I probably won't get to see that clip.

    'Cos I really REALLY want to see a dancer who feels all her performances are so great (what was it, better than 98% of the rest of us?), but has only been belly dancing 5 years, without benefit of a great BD teacher or an appropriate cultural environment, AND and isn't pulling the it's in my blood/genes" routine. AND is a ME drum artist. It's so rare, we should treasure it. Really.

    Impending disappointment-flavoured popcorn...

  5. #35
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    Moderator breaking in here.

    All our forum members have full status and the right to be taken seriously whatever their age, race, gender, political leanings, or style preferences.

    Thank you.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttercup View Post
    Thanks again Maria, for asking, have a great day!!!!...Oh and how did you come upon belly dancing?
    I was surfing another forum I hang out on many years ago, and one of the members was raving about how wonderful belly dance is. At that time, I was just pushing into my 40's and feeling a bit like life had passed me by, but when I saw her video and how beautifully she moved and how happy she was when dancing, it was something I wanted for myself. It just took me almost 6 years to do something about it

  7. #37
    AFK Moderator ~Diana~'s Avatar
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    Please people stop making me feel like I am back in junior high school surrounded by immature girls who each think that they are more mature than another. Resorting to name calling, flashing around whatever age (btw age does not equal maturity), race, gender, intelligence level, hormonal balance, ability to balance on left foot while eating a coconut and reciting Shakespeare, etc does not make you look like the more mature individual to anyone reading your messages.

    This thread started off well and I hope it can be brought back to the realm of civility. If you feel the need to continue your childlike name calling, snarkyness, tit-for-tat attitudes please take it to offline to personal messages.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Now back to the topic. I don't think there is any one better way to learn a dance form over another. Each way has benefits over the other. As you progress in your learning you should adjust they way you learn and how much you learn from each method area. I don't think any of my mentors would ever say yes 'technical' skill is better over learning by 'dancing'. I've seen videos where the dance looked more like I was watching them 'drilling' because they put to much emphasis on 'technical'. I've also seen dances were they probably would improve by spending a little less time 'dancing' putting a little more time into 'technical.'

    The real good dancers, you will see them doing a blend of 'technical' and 'dance.' I would actually be very suspicious of a teacher who put no emphasis at all when it comes to the impact that technical and drills can have on ones performance.
    Last edited by ~Diana~; 05-13-2011 at 03:44 PM.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    1. Beginning dancer. Knows nothing.
    2. Intermediate dancer. Knows everything. Too good to dance with beginners.
    3. Hotshot dancer. Too good to dance with anyone.
    4. Advanced dancer. Dances everything. Especially with beginners
    .
    ~ Attributed to Dick Crum, a folk dance teacher ~

  8. #38
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    we are in a society in which peer pressure is enormous and the INDIVIDUAL can easily and succinctly be stomped out. This is not a race or color thing. This deleting of the individual has much more far-reaching implications than you might think. I find people of all races that have no body awareness. I believe that this comes from our societies telling us that we don't hurt when we do, and that it is not okay to feel. People are having their souls stomped on by being told that what they feel is not important. We need to start appreciating individuals. I believe we should be able to describe each other as we are without people getting angry, but at the same time not use derogatory terms to do so. I also see INSENSITIVE people call SENSITIVE people OVER-SENSITIVE. Well, I'm sensitive. I hope to stay that way, because if I become insensitive, how will I feel my dance? How will I feel what others feel? How can I help them if I cannot feel? If you cannot feel, start looking for your soul..... it may be stomped into pieces, and you will need to find it and try to repair it. As for the dance, of course you need both types of instruction, or one will look like a workout and the other social dance and not performance.

  9. #39
    V.I.P. Aziyade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gypsy View Post
    which is truly the better way to learn to bellydance, by learning move by move, what I'll call 'technique', or by dancing?
    Different people learn in different ways, but think of it as learning a musical instrument. It's extremely important to be able to play each individual note properly, and to transition from one note to the next, but it's also important to learn to PLAY music, with feeling.

    If you have ever had your instructor turn on music and just start moving, using simple dance moves for the students to follow, did you find it more inspiring than when doing technical stuff?
    One of the things that I loved so much about bellydance when I first started learning it was that you could take a half dozen movements and actually really EXPRESS yourself through movement. It was inspiring to me to just put on music and "play" with movement.

    Practicing drills and the "technical" stuff is like playing scales and arpeggios. You can't expect to be very good at playing a musical instrument without that technical stuff. But the goal behind all the technical stuff is to express the music without having to worry about posture and correct execution. Most teachers will tell you that the ultimate goal of all the practice is to give you the skills to execute the movements without thinking about them. They become internalized.

    I felt lighter on my feet, more in the flow that way, whereas the mechanized step by step portion of class was of course more difficult, resulting in a ridgid movement.
    That's natural, and as you get more experienced with it, those step-by-step portions of the class will stop being so rigid, and you will relax into them more. But as you learn each new thing, be aware that the first stage of learning is that awkward phase, which often feels very uncomfortable and stiff.


    I guess I would just like to hear what others think of utilizing the dance to the music method during early level classes.
    It can be overwhelming for some students -- especially the ones who don't particularly like learning that way. For others it's very liberating. My students are about half and half hating and loving improv. There are lots of exercises we can go to make improv less "traumatic" and sometimes we can teach very simple choreographies that allow students more room for personal interpretation and expression.

  10. #40
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    A good friend of mine teaches martial arts and, when it comes to improv, something she told me years ago really resonates. Most martial artists will, in an actual sparring or a fighting situation, use techniques somewhat below the belt level that they test at. This is because, it's the lower level techniques that are so ingrained in muscle memory as to be instinctive.

    When we improv as student dancers, we need to remember that we won't be whipping out the challenging move that we learned three weeks ago in class. It's the basic movements and layering over the basic movements that we're comfortable with that are going to come out when we improv. I think a lot of students forget that and stress about being able to integrate the really challenging stuff that we're just learning, when our performance and musicality will be much stronger when we dance within our comfort zone.

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