Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18
  1. #11
    Super Moderator gisela's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    4,624
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you all for good suggestions and advice. Be assured that my absence from this thread is not because I don't value your input. I have been kind of swamped with stuff lately. I had the third class this tuesday and it is going better and better. I'm feeling much more secure now and I am really enjoying teaching.

    This time I had them learn some combos after drilling the basics. Then at choreo-time I danced half of the song to show them how the new combos fitted in and then we danced it together a few times. Then we went into details again about weight shift and number of steps in turns etc.
    It was a nice way of doing it I think. At least for now.
    I absolutely realize that everyone learns best in a different way, that's why I asked about your preffered way, and you guys gave me lot's of good stuff to consider.

    What I sometimes object to when being taught something in a very broken down way, is that it is really difficult to see the big picture. I can copy the teacher's movement, but until there is music and a flow in the movement, it doesn't make sense to me, so drilling it once or hundred times would be equally useless. I would like to give my students the sense of dance, instead of chopped up moves. Ok, of course we all want that but my experience as a student is that not all teachers succeed in this.
    Last edited by gisela; 09-22-2011 at 11:25 PM.

  2. #12
    Premium Member Aniseteph's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sussex, England
    Posts
    4,856
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gisela View Post
    What I sometimes object to when being taught something in a very broken down way, is that it is really difficult to see the big picture. I can copy the teacher's movement, but until there is music and a flow in the movement, it doesn't make sense to me, so drilling it once or hundred times would be equally useless.
    I know what you mean - there's a bit in our latest one that I'm finding tricky, and I think it works better if I approach it by copying the whole thing then tweaking the resultant mess into shape, rather than having it broken down and slooower and slooooweeeerrrr...

    Totally with you on the music - very frustrating. Just put the music on and I can probably HEAR what you are trying to explain.

    Glad it's going well and you are enjoying it!

  3. #13
    Super Moderator gisela's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    4,624
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    thanks. I'm liking it way more than I thought I would. And I love to discover that I KNOW stuff

  4. #14
    Moderator Farasha Hanem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    In the heartland of the USA
    Posts
    4,805
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick View Post
    When you start teaching choreography remember that you are going to set an example of great dance for your students. So teach them with enthusiasm and passion. Your students would love your classes for sure.
    Enthusiasm and passion are great, but I also prefer a teacher who gives me visual demonstrations, sectioned breakdowns and drills, and who will also give printed handouts of the choreography, as well as allowing me to video our classes for added practice at home.

    I've never had anyone teach me backwards choreo. Knowing me, that would probably mix me up more, since I'm so directionally challenged!

  5. #15
    Moderator Darshiva's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Kyabram, Vic
    Posts
    4,471
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    It's not as 'backwards' as it sounds. It's just a learning device that cuts up the choreo into chunks and teaches each chunk leading onto the last instead of following the first. The idea is that instead of having to remember the new bit at the end of what you've already learned, you worry about the new bit first and then move on to the stuff you already know.

  6. #16
    V.I.P. jenc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Colchester UK
    Posts
    2,124
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I find it very helpful to take each chunk a little further than the breakdown on the final practice so that we have to try to follow a bit. Then when we start the breakdown we have an idea of how things are going. Not evry time tho.

    Make sure that you go back to the beginning often enough. If I keep learning in chunks, my mind goes blank at the end of each combo.

    Make sure that those who want it can have the music. I like to play the music in my car so that I know it by heart and can then visualise the routine.

    when it is finished, let someonme video it from behnid for the students.

    Whoops I didn't read everything. Being taught backwards would be great - my current teacher works out the choreo week by week as we come to a new bit - (I exaggerate slightly) but it is not uncommon for the choreo to be completed in week 6. This means that whatever we learn, we know there is a gaping void at the end - so remembering the whole thing is v diff - partic as we only get to dance whole thing on last night unless we are going to perform it!!
    Last edited by Shanazel; 09-28-2011 at 03:27 AM. Reason: merge

  7. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    38
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Love the learning backwards idea!

    My suggestion probably won't help much since you are already in the midst of teaching the choreography, and it won't work for shorter class sessions where you only have a few weeks to work on something specific, but if you have the latitude of a full semester or, better yet, a full year, this is what I like to do.

    I have the next class choreography worked out at least a full semester in advance. We start out focusing on drilling individual movements that will be used in the choreography in the midst of all the other cultural/contextual stuff we usually do in class. Then we drill combinations. Still no mention of a choreography. This gives us a chance to really break down and clean up different parts of what will later become part of the choreo, without the pressure of actually thinking about it *as* a choreography. This way, when we do start working the choreo, they already know exactly how I want a move delivered, where the weight shifts are, etc. All they have to do on the technical side is remember what order we are doing things in and we can start focusing on emotion and expression and musical interpretation much earlier. I get a lot of "your choreographies are so easy to learn" type comments. No they're not, you've been working on them all semester! Added bonus, I've usually got my lesson plans mapped out 6 months in advance, and since we worked on it for so long, along with other things, you not only know the choreo, you know the building blocks I used to create it and and their variations. We've had time to discuss the music and the cultural context and my various inspirations. Even tho my advanced students know this is how I work and appreciate it, I still feel like I'm in ninja-stealth mode as I slip in bits of choreography into class and slip bits of cultural notes into the choreography.

    For my advanced class, we can do this process in a semester and there is a possibility of learning 2 choreos a year if we choose to do so. For my beginning intermediate class, we do one choreography a year and this process begins all the way back in the fall with an eye on the spring recital. When I was in troupe, we were learning a new choreo pretty much every month and an additional technique class was required for membership.

  8. #18
    Moderator Darshiva's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Kyabram, Vic
    Posts
    4,471
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    That's a great technique Lara. I hope to steal it mercilessly one day!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •