Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    188
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default How do I ask my dance teacher to teach more floorwork?

    I do not want to make anyone mad.

  2. #2
    Member Shakti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    213
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I would inquire about a private lesson if there is something specific you want to learn. Or just mention that you would like to learn, and see what she says.

  3. #3
    V.I.P. Yame's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,285
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Just... ask? I mean, don't blurt it out in the middle of class, but pull her aside before or after class, or email her, and let her know you'd love to learn floorwork more often. This isn't *telling* her what to do, but letting her know what's on your mind and planting a seed. Then she can decide whether or not to go along with your suggestion.

    Most teachers who are worth their salt would be thrilled to know their students have specific topics of interest. Maybe this particular topic isn't a part of her expertise so she may not be able to offer much of it, but you don't have anything to lose by letting her know you are interested.

  4. #4
    Moderator Darshiva's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Kyabram, Vic
    Posts
    4,471
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Please don't think me rude for asking, but why on earth would you want to learn floorwork if you're so concerned about modesty that it affects your costume choice?

    I personally don't teach OR perform floorwork because I feel it ties in too quickly to the bellydancer=hooker trope.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    188
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Darshiva View Post
    Please don't think me rude for asking, but why on earth would you want to learn floorwork if you're so concerned about modesty that it affects your costume choice?

    I personally don't teach OR perform floorwork because I feel it ties in too quickly to the bellydancer=hooker trope.
    I choose not to argue about this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Yame View Post
    Just... ask? I mean, don't blurt it out in the middle of class, but pull her aside before or after class, or email her, and let her know you'd love to learn floorwork more often. This isn't *telling* her what to do, but letting her know what's on your mind and planting a seed. Then she can decide whether or not to go along with your suggestion.

    Most teachers who are worth their salt would be thrilled to know their students have specific topics of interest. Maybe this particular topic isn't a part of her expertise so she may not be able to offer much of it, but you don't have anything to lose by letting her know you are interested.
    Okay I will do that.
    Last edited by Shanazel; 10-30-2011 at 04:01 AM.

  6. #6
    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,952
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Just ask. However, ... once when I decided to add some floorwork into my classes I had a mutiny. They all thought it was a great idea - until we had to do it. None of my students had the fitness to repeatedly lower and raise themselves - let alone doing anything "exciting". Floorwork takes strong quads, abs and glutes, reasonable flexibility, and good knees and hips and only then can you start layering in the control for graceful presentation.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    188
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kashmir View Post
    Just ask. However, ... once when I decided to add some floorwork into my classes I had a mutiny. They all thought it was a great idea - until we had to do it. None of my students had the fitness to repeatedly lower and raise themselves - let alone doing anything "exciting". Floorwork takes strong quads, abs and glutes, reasonable flexibility, and good knees and hips and only then can you start layering in the control for graceful presentation.
    You are so right. Maybe I can start taking private lessons instead. That way, it would not be a problem.

  8. #8
    Moderator Farasha Hanem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    In the heartland of the USA
    Posts
    4,805
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kashmir View Post
    Just ask. However, ... once when I decided to add some floorwork into my classes I had a mutiny. They all thought it was a great idea - until we had to do it. None of my students had the fitness to repeatedly lower and raise themselves - let alone doing anything "exciting". Floorwork takes strong quads, abs and glutes, reasonable flexibility, and good knees and hips and only then can you start layering in the control for graceful presentation.
    I know there are differing opinions on floorwork, and valid reasons for those opinions, which I respect. This is probably going to sound weird, but personally, when our class learns a new routine that includes a choice of either being an "up person" or a "down person" (the "down people being those who choose to do the floorwork), I always choose to learn and do the floorwork. At 50, I want to stay strong and flexible, especially now that I'm beginning to feel those first few twinges of Mr. Arthur Itis. I'm bound and determined to fight it and keep moving, and doing floorwork, along with yoga and regular exercise, is helping my body to stay strong.

  9. #9
    V.I.P. Aziyade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Cornfields of Evansville Indiana.
    Posts
    2,743
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Yame View Post
    Maybe this particular topic isn't a part of her expertise so she may not be able to offer much of it,

    Floorwork in a mixed level class can be a nightmare. It takes a while to build up the strength for even the most basic of movements, and the teacher has to rely upon the students to practice and condition routinely AT HOME, which some will and some won't. For safety reasons, a lot of ACE and AFAA certified instructors won't even attempt teaching floorwork in their once-weekly classes. It's too easy for students to get hurt.

    I haven't yet met an Egyptian style instructor who put the focus on floorwork. So if your teacher is primarily teaching Egyptian, don't count on her having a thorough knowledge enough of it to teach it -- or if she feels it's not an integral part of the dance, she may not want to spend the class time addressing it. Private lessons may be an option, or she may refer you to videos or another instructor.

  10. #10
    V.I.P. Yame's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,285
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aziyade View Post
    Floorwork in a mixed level class can be a nightmare. It takes a while to build up the strength for even the most basic of movements, and the teacher has to rely upon the students to practice and condition routinely AT HOME, which some will and some won't. For safety reasons, a lot of ACE and AFAA certified instructors won't even attempt teaching floorwork in their once-weekly classes. It's too easy for students to get hurt.

    I haven't yet met an Egyptian style instructor who put the focus on floorwork. So if your teacher is primarily teaching Egyptian, don't count on her having a thorough knowledge enough of it to teach it -- or if she feels it's not an integral part of the dance, she may not want to spend the class time addressing it. Private lessons may be an option, or she may refer you to videos or another instructor.
    Yes. Not all teachers are qualified to teach everything, and certain things don't work well in certain classes as you and others above have pointed out. This is why I say put the thought out there, but don't be surprised or offended if it doesn't change a thing.

    Over the years, you get to know your teacher and your class and you know what works and what doesn't, what she can offer and what she can't. My classmates and I are lucky to have a teacher who is both very open to ideas and very knowledgeable of many different facets of belly dance. We have a very small class and we all take full advantage of that, by letting her know the things we like and want to work on, teachers we like that she could sponsor for a workshop, etc. Some wonderful classes and workshops have resulted out of that.

    Of course however, I don't expect every class to be modelled after our likes and tastes. If she thinks there is something we need to work on, she will make us work on it no matter how much we dislike it!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •