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  1. #11
    Super Moderator gisela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darshiva View Post
    Daim, in light of what you just requested, you should have used 'has' (past tense) instead of 'have' (present tense) in your first sentence.
    Isn't it actually because " my spelling" can be replaced with "it", and "it has" is correct, but not "it have"?

    Reading danish online is awful, really awful. The language is so full of letters that are said in a different way or resembles other letters so people with no training to write just don't spell very well. For me it is really horrible. As I am a foreigner here, with a similar but still different mother tongue, I go out of my way to learn danish properly. Therefore it makes me so annoyed with all the bad spelling going on. I am a visual learner and the more I see a word misspelled, the more confused I get.

    The internet has given people who wouldn't otherwise be "published" a place to write publicly. That is both good and bad, as I indeed know that people can be brilliant even if they don't spell well.

    Myself, I write way more than I used to. I never liked to write, but I was pretty good when I did. Through this forum and Bhuz, my english is kept active, which is wonderful. Spelling is kind of the same as before. My punctuation is as awful as it ever was

  2. #12
    Moderator Darshiva's Avatar
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    Strictly speaking, you're accurate but not correct. The 'replace word with' is a device used to remind you what to do in certain situations, but since she was speaking in the past tense, she needs to use the past tense version of the word.

    English is a pain. :P

  3. #13
    Super Moderator gisela's Avatar
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    But... (sorry I am not being a pest. I just like to discuss language and make sure I understand why )

    If she would have said " I have gone from using british english to american english" that would still be past tense. My point is "has gone" and "have gone" is the same tense, it just depends on who have/has gone.

  4. #14
    Moderator Darshiva's Avatar
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    Good point. Like I said, english is a pain.

  5. #15
    Moderator Zorba's Avatar
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    Darshiva - see if there's a way to turn off the touchpad. That happens to me too, and it drives me bat$h!t!

  6. #16
    Senior Member nightdancer's Avatar
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    It's also a pluralization issue. For a singular object, it would be "have". For plural object, it would be "has".

    "My horses have" and "My horse has" is a good example.

    Just throwing that out there to make it a little more confusing.

  7. #17
    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daimona View Post
    My spelling have unfortunately gone from British english to American english during the last decade (I wish I could find a way to turn off the American english dictionary on my computer, as it would make it easier to keep to British english which was what taught in school).
    If you are using Microsoft Word you need to set the language of the Normal style in the Normal template (Normal.dot pre Word 2007, Normal.dotm 2007 & 2010). PM me if you need help.

    Google Chrome - the only browser I know with a spell checker only has American English. Booo!

  8. #18
    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darshiva View Post
    Good point. Like I said, english is a pain.
    Try Hungarian - apart from the "standard" three persons (I,you,it) in singular and plural there are two extra persons used for social status - and the verbs change depending on whether or not the object is direct or indirect. But at least there is no gender distinction. Then there is Arabic with gender distinctions - and duals.

    Really, English is a very, very simple language that is extremely forgiving with bad grammar and spelling - which is possibly why so many people are sloppy.

    Language with "logical" spelling either have not been a written language for long (most English was spelt as it was pronounced - only the pronunciation has drifted) or has not been exported far. Take Arabic again - Egyptians pronounce it in their own way – but keep the “standard” spelling – such as Raqia. This means you can work out a word’s roots easily. Same with Hungarian, many combinations of letters are not written as pronounced (népdal is pronounced nébdal) – despite it being a recent written language because to do so would make it hard to work out what a new word means (nép = people, dal = song ie folksong).

    Logical spelling for English would mean either many words would have several different spellings or most people would not be covered in the “standard” spelling. This way everyone loses – but you can often work out meanings and history from words. Cupboard anyone?

  9. #19
    Super Moderator Mosaic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kashmir View Post
    Try Hungarian - apart from the "standard" three persons (I,you,it) in singular and plural there are two extra persons used for social status - and the verbs change depending on whether or not the object is direct or indirect. But at least there is no gender distinction. Then there is Arabic with gender distinctions - and duals.

    Really, English is a very, very simple language that is extremely forgiving with bad grammar and spelling - which is possibly why so many people are sloppy.

    Language with "logical" spelling either have not been a written language for long (most English was spelt as it was pronounced - only the pronunciation has drifted) or has not been exported far. Take Arabic again - Egyptians pronounce it in their own way – but keep the “standard” spelling – such as Raqia. This means you can work out a word’s roots easily. Same with Hungarian, many combinations of letters are not written as pronounced (népdal is pronounced nébdal) – despite it being a recent written language because to do so would make it hard to work out what a new word means (nép = people, dal = song ie folksong).

    Logical spelling for English would mean either many words would have several different spellings or most people would not be covered in the “standard” spelling. This way everyone loses – but you can often work out meanings and history from words. Cupboard anyone?
    OK I'll bite I believe the word cupboard originated in the Middle Ages, it was a board or table where cups & mugs were kept, this soon became an open shelf type of dresser, the cups/mugs were usually placed on the open shelves, so still a sort of "board" for cups
    ~Mosaic
    Dance is like glitter, it not only colours your life, it makes you sparkle, you find it everywhere and in everything and it's near impossible to get rid of. (unknown)


  10. #20
    Moderator Daimona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darshiva View Post
    Daim, in light of what you just requested, you should have used 'has' (past tense) instead of 'have' (present tense) in your first sentence.
    Thank you, Darshiva! (Just a test you know.. I really do know the rule - I just forget to apply it when I'm tired or change my mind in the middle of the sentence. *note-to-self: Be more aware of this when tired* ):
    I have
    You have
    He/She/It has
    We have
    You (pl.) have
    They have


    As for the magical moving cursor, do as Zorba says. It is easier than keeping your fingers/hand off the touchpad while writing.


    Quote Originally Posted by gisela View Post
    As I am a foreigner here, with a similar but still different mother tongue, I go out of my way to learn danish properly. Therefore it makes me so annoyed with all the bad spelling going on. I am a visual learner and the more I see a word misspelled, the more confused I get.
    Gisela: I'm with you getting confused of reading bad or incorrect language when you are trying to learn. I've actually discovered that I need to be picky of the language used in books and novels I'm reading in English. The main reason I choose to read a book written in English, which also has been translated to Norwegian, is to improve my own language. I've seen books that I could not continue to read because they would ruin everything I've learnt so far.


    Quote Originally Posted by Kashmir View Post
    Try Hungarian - apart from the "standard" three persons (I,you,it) in singular and plural there are two extra persons used for social status - and the verbs change depending on whether or not the object is direct or indirect. But at least there is no gender distinction.
    They never touched that subject at the 2h Hungarian-German language course I once attended (not having learnt German prior the course made it a bit more challenging though ).

    Quote Originally Posted by Kashmir View Post
    If you are using Microsoft Word you need to set the language of the Normal style in the Normal template (Normal.dot pre Word 2007, Normal.dotm 2007 & 2010). PM me if you need help.
    I have British English and Norwegian (bm) as default in M$ Office, but if a part is written in American English it is identified as that because I've ticked the check box for identifying language automatically. (I write different languages daily, so changing the normal template would be p.i.t.a. )


    Quote Originally Posted by Kashmir View Post
    Really, English is a very, very simple language that is extremely forgiving with bad grammar and spelling - which is possibly why so many people are sloppy.
    You may be right about this. Norwegian is also considered a relatively simple language (though, some of the foreigners I work with that are trying to learn Norwegian probably don't agree), and I am seeing the same trends here. Ordinary people are being understood despite getting sloppy and don't bother to correct themselves (whatever official language they write, as you may know - we have two official versions of Norwegian; one is constructed and based on dialects, the other is a remnant of Danish which has been modified heavily) - and then there are all the dialects themselves..

    The grammar question of the day:
    Is it correct that all countries, languages and nationalities are always capitalized in English?
    --
    Daim.

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