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Thread: Lazy is good?

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    Default Lazy is good?

    Maybe you don't have to practise quite as much as you thought...

    Taking a break makes practice perfect | UNSW Newsroom

    But maybe you do...

    This article is longer, but interesting. For those who love total accuracy, near the end it talks about "muscle memory" actually being more like "myelin memory"

    Practice makes perfect? - All In The Mind - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

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    Moderator Darshiva's Avatar
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    Being sensible about taking breaks /= being lazy.
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    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    Somewhere there is a recent thread re: taking regular breaks during class to facilitate learning. I said I was going to try it in my classes and see how my students reacted.

    I am notorious for forgetting to take breaks. I assigned a couple of students the task of giving me a high sign for brief breaks every fifteen of twenty minutes during our 90 minute class.

    The concensus of students: they retained what they learned better with breaks.

    The opinion of the teacher: this was our most successful performance yet with even my slowest students learning a fairly complex choreography.

    We had an absolute and total blast at rehearsal, performance and aftermath at our favorite local hangout. All students attended and brought family and friends with them. Our usual group of six or eight expanded to sixteen that night and we are hoping to gain a couple of new students from the expansion including (fingers crossed) one of the waiters at the restaurant.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

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    That's a good reminder for people like me, Shanazel. When rehearsing, I tend to push myself until ready to drop. I'm also hopeless at remembering other people's choreographies. So I've probably been regularly pushing myself into the "inefficient, waste of time" zone.

    Actually, a similar thing happened with this year's dreaded school end-of-year concert. With a number of children in my class with big issues, I kept rehearsals short and as sweet as possible. They ended up preforming as well as classes in previous years when I made the poor little things work much harder

    I also love the research that shows watching movement makes the brain work as if your own body was doing it. Holidays on the sofa watching BD videos coming up! And I'm sure I've read somwhere that eating chocolate helps your body make more myelin, ready to embed all that vicarious dancing into the muscle memory

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    Oh, Darshiva, some of us have no such thing as common sense about some things. The hours of midnight oil I've burned, making not much progress on some project. The habit starts with being a night owl and loving the quiet of the small hours, then takes on a life of its own...

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    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    I hear you! I am writing this at midnight with several hours still left in my work day!
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

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    These articles are fantastic.

    I practice A LOT! Like, 4 hours a day. Unfortunately, I have been wasting a lot of time. A combination of too many classes and "grooving" more than structuring a practice and being mindful has actually hurt my dance more than helped. Over the holidays I'm taking a more disciplined approach.

    It's hard though, because I enjoy "living room" dancing just for the love of it but at the same time when I dance in class and hopefully one day shows I want to look good at a professional, performance level : P

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    Junior Member Shadawing's Avatar
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    I always like to link different arts (dancing with drawing, drawing with a music, music with dancing, everything) because the vast of majority in arts is not definitive, but it's all art in the end. The better I become at drawing and painting (my main skills and future profession) the better I do my makeup, take/edit photos, dance, weave...

    So, what I learned from drawing is that break is very important because of the way we see things. When I am drawing, let's say - a portret, I always take a break, about 5 min (although it's not definitive). And I always see different things ; I easily correct mistakes, keep good things and improve it altogether. It's mainly because we are focusing on a little detail and forget about the whole construction and composition (in dancing - movement).

    I was always so frustrated when I couldn't do the shimmy, I would think about every single hip movement, when shimmy is actually a relaxed movement. So, when I turned on the music and just tried to easily connect with drums, it was waaaay easily, with better posture and with prettier movements. I actually take breaks every now and then in dancing, it's not like I am doing the 90% break and 10% dancing, I actually do it when I feel the need to refresh things in my mind. It is also (for me) a way to remember a coreography better, or to hear a new sound I would like to describe in dancing.

    So, what I would call lazy is not practicing at all, or, if practicing, giving up on a movemnt way too easy to watch soap opera. That is wat I call lazy.

    So, basically, why I do take breaks is to refresh things in my mind and avoid being frustrated when I can't do a movement very well.

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    The information is there; some of us need to get the behaviour into the "acceptable" range. I naturally feel that if there is energy and focus, I should keep going. Or that the time to stop is when you can't go on any more. That doesn't mean that the energy and focus are top quality; perceptions slide along with ability as one tires.

    But then, I was raised by a mother who lived by the adage "busy is the best way to be." Even now that she is officially old, her rear end touches a chair only long enough either to get her food down of remember another job that should be done.

    The resting time doesn't have to mean inactivity of course, but in someone else's dance studio it needs a different approach to lesson structure.

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