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  1. #1
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    Default Workshop attendance

    How much training do you think a student should have before attending a workshop?

    I just got word of a neat sounding workshop next month. It's Egyptian and I've been going in a more Turkish direction style wise but I think it would be fun.

  2. #2
    V.I.P. Aziyade's Avatar
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    GO!!!!!


    Well, depending upon the workshop itself, you may fit in well or be totally over your head, BUT -- there is what we call the $40 (or I guess it's probably up to $80) moment, where you learn or discover something so valuable to you that it's worth that $40 alone.

    If it's a workshop with a native Egyptian, they often just do the "follow the bouncing butt" method of instruction, which can be really difficult for people not used to that method. Or they can break everything down. It really depends.

    But workshops are social events as much as educational ones. You can shop, make connections, and watch the evening show (if there is one) to get exposure to local dancers and different styles.

    I took my first workshop after about 6-8 months of classes and I was totally over my head, but I brought home some new moves, new combos, new music, new friendships, and way too many hip scarves

  3. #3
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    Can you find out what level the workshop is intended for? If it's geared toward intermediates and you are an advanced beginner, for example, it might still be worth your while to attend. If it is a master class aimed at advanced and professional dancers, you might still learn something great but feel totally overwhelmed.

    I usually feel that if I take one or two good nuggets home from a workshop, it was worthwhile.

    I personally hate choreography workshops, there's no way I can learn a choreo in a couple of hours, so I avoid those. To me a great workshop has some technique, some combinations, maybe a new step or two, with new-to-me musical or cultural information thrown in and the chance to see a wonderful dancer up close and personal.

  4. #4
    Moderator Darshiva's Avatar
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    Agreeing with the other two - GO!
    Bellydance in Kyabram!
    Skype classes a specialty.
    Email kyabrambellydance@gmail.com for more information.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Sophia Maria's Avatar
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    Yep. Always worth it. Unless in the workshop description it says something like "intermediate to advanced" or "not beginner level"...you can always learn a lot even if you can't follow the bouncing butt

  6. #6
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    I went to my first workshop about 6 months after I started dancing and enjoyed it tremendously. I managed to keep up and came back with a few steps. I"ve found even the choreography workshops are educational for me as sometimes I learn new ways to combine steps, dance to the music or just enjoy the company of others.

  7. #7
    Member AndreaSTL's Avatar
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    What they said.

    I figure if I learn one thing then it was worth it. There was only one seminar that was so completely awful that I didn't go back after lunch. Unless it's marketed as master class or advanced only I'm sure you'll have an overall positive and fun experience.

  8. #8
    AFK Moderator ~Diana~'s Avatar
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    It all depends on what level the workshop is teaching at. Some workshops have notice that they are for a certain level of dance experience but if they don't they are probably designed for all levels.

    I'm taking professional level workshops now but I would have no clue if I took them as a student. Go but if you are concerned about it shoot off an email to the person hosting it or the teacher of the workshop. They would be able to tell you.

    I've been to some workshops where it was for higher level/more experienced dancers and there were beginner dancers there. However to be honest, they didn't have a good time. They were left behind in a lot of stuff, didn't know how to do some moves and needed to be taught, and then the teacher changed the workshop half way though so that they could be more included; which meant that the higher skill set most of us were looking for didn't get taught.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    1. Beginning dancer. Knows nothing.
    2. Intermediate dancer. Knows everything. Too good to dance with beginners.
    3. Hotshot dancer. Too good to dance with anyone.
    4. Advanced dancer. Dances everything. Especially with beginners
    .
    ~ Attributed to Dick Crum, a folk dance teacher ~

  9. #9
    V.I.P. Yame's Avatar
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    It depends on the workshop. You should find out from the person sponsoring/hosting it, or the person teaching it.

  10. #10
    Member Munniko's Avatar
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    Gonna just piggy back on this thread, my studio just sent out an e-mail saying that they are going to be hosting a workshop during the summer and it will be a day and a half workshop closing with a gala. They've listed the instructors (there are going to be four) and I know one of them from the circuit around her and people are pretty much in unison on she can be a little bit rigid on "my way or the high way" on how you do your moves. It definitely doesn't fit my style of learning, would it be worth it to go to this workshop still? I'm only asking because I can't find any videos on any of the instructors.

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