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  1. #1
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    Hi.

    I'm a male and a dancer. To make a long story short I was looking at African dances and loved the way these dances encourage the movement in a man's hips. This is my ultimate goal one day. To look similar or better than these guys -- hopefully:
    Soukous dance - YouTube

    Unforutantely the most popular of this dance (soukous, coupe-decale, azonto) isn't really offered where I stay-- Miami, FL, but do you think bellydancing could somewhat suffice for teaching me these waist-centric movements?

    And yes... I understand African dancing does not equal belly-dancing but if in case I can't find an African class to teach me these hip/waist movements, would a belly-dancing class give me somewhat of a technique to know how to move my waist hips better until then?
    Last edited by Shanazel; 01-28-2013 at 06:47 AM. Reason: merge

  2. #2
    Member AyaKara's Avatar
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    Firstly, welcome to the forum! It's nice to see another male here

    Belly dance has some of the best body isolations in dance, in my opinion. You'll learn how to move most parts of your body, especially your hips & waist area, in many different & powerful ways. However, bellydance discourages the upward-thrust movements of Soukous.

    I suggest you try a class & see if it's for you! But, if you can, keep looking out for opportunities in African dance, since that's what you want to do most. Wishing you the best! African dance is very mesmerizing & beautiful

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by AyaKara View Post
    Firstly, welcome to the forum! It's nice to see another male here

    Belly dance has some of the best body isolations in dance, in my opinion. You'll learn how to move most parts of your body, especially your hips & waist area, in many different & powerful ways. However, bellydance discourages the upward-thrust movements of Soukous.

    I suggest you try a class & see if it's for you! But, if you can, keep looking out for opportunities in African dance, since that's what you want to do most. Wishing you the best! African dance is very mesmerizing & beautiful
    Thanks for the welcome! I'm sorry, could you clarify on what you mean by "upward thrust movements"? Thanks

  4. #4
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    Standing with the legs apart and sharply thrusting upward and forward with the pelvic region.

    There is a movement called African shimmy which is a very subtle forward and back shimmy (as opposed to side to side).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shanazel View Post
    Standing with the legs apart and sharply thrusting upward and forward with the pelvic region.

    There is a movement called African shimmy which is a very subtle forward and back shimmy (as opposed to side to side).
    Oh, okay. Thanks!

    Thanks so much for the replies, guys!

    I'm thinking I'll just take the class and then later on when I finally do get a chance to do Soukous, just apply what I know for at least knowing how to move my waist, and then go from there?

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    V.I.P. Aziyade's Avatar
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    I hope I can speak for the guys on this one, but I'm not a guy, so you may take this with the appropriate grains of salt:

    One of the things that really stands out as a characteristic of -- at least Egyptian -- bellydance is the quality of "coyness" in the dancer. It's a subtle dance, hinting at a lot, but not actually coming out and saying it. (Unless you're Sadie. lol) Because of that, we call it a feminine dance. It's not as "in your face" as jazz or what I've seen of South and West African dance. And as Shan said, our pelvic work is much softer. I don't think Arabs appreciate the sharp pelvic work, especially when the "thrust" is directed up and out like that.

    Bellydance will help with the pelvic rotational movements you see in that video, but remember the overall FEELING of bellydance is completely different than in the African dance I've seen, and the dance in the clip you posted. African men's dances tend to be very strong and direct, where bellydance is sort of the opposite. African dance is speaking loudly and clearly, while bellydance is sort of hinting and talking with your hand covering your mouth, if that makes any sense.

    But hey -- you might get bit by the bellydance bug and find you really like it!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aziyade View Post
    I hope I can speak for the guys on this one, but I'm not a guy, so you may take this with the appropriate grains of salt:

    One of the things that really stands out as a characteristic of -- at least Egyptian -- bellydance is the quality of "coyness" in the dancer. It's a subtle dance, hinting at a lot, but not actually coming out and saying it. (Unless you're Sadie. lol) Because of that, we call it a feminine dance. It's not as "in your face" as jazz or what I've seen of South and West African dance. And as Shan said, our pelvic work is much softer. I don't think Arabs appreciate the sharp pelvic work, especially when the "thrust" is directed up and out like that.

    Bellydance will help with the pelvic rotational movements you see in that video, but remember the overall FEELING of bellydance is completely different than in the African dance I've seen, and the dance in the clip you posted. African men's dances tend to be very strong and direct, where bellydance is sort of the opposite. African dance is speaking loudly and clearly, while bellydance is sort of hinting and talking with your hand covering your mouth, if that makes any sense.

    But hey -- you might get bit by the bellydance bug and find you really like it!
    Thanks!

    So, I guess.. Egyptian is the style to look for?

    After a couple of days research-- I really still don't understand-- it appears Egyptian emerges as one of my favorites.

    Again-- I still really don't understand the differences between Tribal, Egyptian and Cabaret, but does Egyptian place greater emphasis on the hip movement?

    I guess, I'm really looking just for greater emphasis on hip movement, and really don't care about arm placement, finger cymbals or any of those other things.

  8. #8
    V.I.P. shiradotnet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by achilles007 View Post
    So, I guess.. Egyptian is the style to look for?

    After a couple of days research-- I really still don't understand-- it appears Egyptian emerges as one of my favorites.

    Again-- I still really don't understand the differences between Tribal, Egyptian and Cabaret, but does Egyptian place greater emphasis on the hip movement?
    Egyptian style is the most African of the styles you've listed. It's logical, considering Egypt is actually IN Africa! The other styles you mentioned were made-in-America, so somewhat removed from Africa, influenced by Turkish, etc.

  9. #9
    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by achilles007 View Post
    Again-- I still really don't understand the differences between Tribal, Egyptian and Cabaret, but does Egyptian place greater emphasis on the hip movement?

    I guess, I'm really looking just for greater emphasis on hip movement, and really don't care about arm placement, finger cymbals or any of those other things.
    You should learn hip movement in all styles - but yes, proportionally more in Egyptian as it doesn't have such an emphasis on upperbody or torso like Turkish, AmCab or Tribal - so you should spend more of your time working on hip movements.

    FYI Egyptian styles include both "cabaret" (orientale) styles and a range of folkoric styles. The later may be hard to find and if heavily influenced by Reda will include lots of footwork which you probably are not interested in - and little hip articulation.

  10. #10
    Member BigJim's Avatar
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    If you're just interested in getting more mobility in your hips you might start with a dvd.... some of the Forum members might be able to recommend one that has a heavy emphasis on the hips... this might spark an interest and you could then look around for an instructor... once started you could be hooked for life.... I know... it happened to me.... Jim

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