Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 41

Thread: Colour codes??

  1. #21
    Moderator Farasha Hanem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    In the heartland of the USA
    Posts
    4,790
    Post Thanks / Like

    Big Grin

    Quote Originally Posted by Daimona View Post
    I believe it is down to individual taste.
    According to some of the Egyptian designers, hot pink has been rather popular the last years.

    (personally I hate any shade of pink and would never get enough payment to be willing to perform in one... )
    80 HOT PINK?!? *GASP!!!* YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY!!!!!

    Yup, pink MUST be an entirely appropriate color choice for me---look at that "little girl enthusiasm!" xP
    Last edited by Farasha Hanem; 11-05-2014 at 08:51 AM.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Duvet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    721
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shanazel View Post
    Um, you might be overthinking this one, Duvet.

    An audience is composed of individuals. For every individual who perceives hot pink as exciting there is another who finds it tawdry and artificial.

    You like quotes. Take this one from Oscar Wilde and translate it into dancerdom:

    Most of our modern portrait painters are doomed to absolute oblivion. They never paint what they see. They paint what the public sees, and the public never sees anything.
    Isn't it the job of the portrait painter to paint what the client sees? Doesn't that apply to dance performances?

    If the audience is paying don't they deserve some consideration from the dancer on what their perception might be? Dancing in black at a wedding, or in red on the first day of the month (made up examples) might be inappropriate. It can't just be about "I look good in green" or "my favourite colour is pink" and then you dress accordingly and to hell with anyone else.

    I feel that performance is about entertainment and inspiration. That needs to incorporate what the audience needs, or might expect. It needn't be about actually giving them what they want (after all, it is always good to push boundaries and educate as well), and if you are dancing for free then those considerations are less (depending on what you are wanting to achieve) and you can concentrate more on pushing your own boundaries. But without some awareness of the audience at all, then you might as well turn your back and dance behind closed curtains with the lights off.

    Thats my personal opinion. I'm not expecting anyone else to share it, or agree with it. I'm happy to argue about it, or be educated otherwise, but it is largely why I wondered if colour played any part in the dance cultures, and in the perception of audiences.
    Last edited by Duvet; 11-12-2014 at 10:13 PM.

  3. #23
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Rocky Mountains USA
    Posts
    15,238
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Isn't it the job of the portrait painter to paint what the client sees? Doesn't that apply to dance performances?
    We call those people prostitutes and while prostitution can make one a decent living, something is lost artistically and spiritually in the process. The artist's job is to create art. The best art comes from an artist expressing what he or she sees or feels.

    That is not to say that when a group requests a traditional baladi piece one should hand them a highly original minuet fusion. It is just good manners to avoid wearing white to a wedding if white is the color of mourning in a particular culture. And if one is designing for a synagogue one would be well-advised not to glorify swastikas in that stained glass window.


    Audiences aren't homogenous bodies whose specific desires can be laid out in an Excel spreadsheet. Someone may have sad memories connected to rose-red. Someone in the same audience may see red as an expression of joy. A dancer cannot reconcile those views nor should she try. Her job is to dance and to costume herself in such a way that the dance is enhanced.

    Don't get me started on costumes that detract from dance- that's a whole nother subject.

    In my experience (and it is considerable at this point) audiences want to be moved by what they observe. Unless someone has something new to say about the Sugar Plum Fairy's dance, I'm not going to be moved by it. If someone has painted a pretty vanity portrait of a powerful woman, what has that artist said about his subject that is worth hearing?

    When I needed thyroid surgery, I didn't seek out an oral surgeon or podiatrist. And having found a qualified surgeon I trusted him to do the job properly without any input from me about the color scrubs he chose or the type of hardware he used. When someone hires an old style American cabaret dancer, that person shouldn't pile on requirements for costumes that holler Turkish and music by Metallica.


    The portrait artist, dancer, wildlife photographer, whoever owes a client or audience the very best of her art, and the very best art never results from trying to create what the client sees because to paraphrase dear Oscar the client rarely sees anything. If the client did, she'd be taking her own pictures and dancing her own dances.
    Last edited by Shanazel; 11-08-2014 at 12:45 AM.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

  4. #24
    Senior Member Duvet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    721
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shanazel View Post
    The portrait artist, dancer, wildlife photographer, whoever owes a client or audience the very best of her art, and the very best art never results from trying to create what the client sees because to paraphrase dear Oscar the client rarely sees anything. If the client did, she'd be taking her own pictures and dancing her own dances.
    Absolutely. But if the client/audience weren't there, then neither would the performer. Dancing as a solely self indulgent medium is not the same as 'performing' (unless you have an extremely forgiving, adulatery or innocent audience - which, admittedly, many audiences are). Oscar hated his critics and the best way to ignore them was to demean their opinion.

    My OP was intended to ask about colour codes in 'traditional' styles or culturally specific contexts. Fusion and adaptation might have made this unimportant in the West. I was curious to know if things were/are different elsewhere.
    Last edited by Duvet; 11-09-2014 at 10:04 PM.

  5. #25
    Member Roshanna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    England
    Posts
    484
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I think it's a valid question, Duvet.
    I've never heard of any particularly rigid colour codes in ME dance, although I might be a little wary of dancing in a jewel-tone green (i.e. Saudi flag green) for certain audiences because of the islamic association. Then again, I don't think that really applies to other shades of green (olive, lime, khaki, very dark green, etc). Which is good, because green is my favourite colour for costumes

  6. #26
    Moderator Amulya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    7,069
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Duvet View Post
    ... Dancing in black at a wedding....
    OT (or back on topic haha): actually dancing in white at a wedding is considered not done as far as I know, it's the same thing like guests are not allowed to wear white (but of course that can vary per country and tradition)

  7. #27
    Moderator Amulya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    7,069
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Duvet View Post
    I thought yellow was a negative colour?
    Yes, in Iran it's the colour of hatred, not sure about other countries. Apparently if you give someone yellow roses it's an insult.

  8. #28
    Moderator Amulya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    7,069
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Duvet View Post
    But don't performers need to consider what the audience will perceive? Maybe hot pink is popular because the dancers know that the audience will perceive it as exciting. Not all belly-dance pockets can stretch to multiple costumes in various colours, but if a choice is available isn't colour just another 'prop' used to match the mood and style of the music, performance or venue?
    I think that's why red is so popular as costume choice, it's a vibrant colour, catches the eye.

  9. #29
    Member Jeanne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    379
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Just saw this thread just now -- interesting topic.

    I have a copy of Zarifa Aradoon's "The Belly Dance Costume Book" from 1978, and I think she has a section in it on symbology of colors in Arab cultures. I'm not at home right now, but I can look it up later and pass the list on. My guess is that the information is not hard and fast rules, as things do vary from place to place, but it's interesting as a general perspective.

  10. #30
    Moderator Zorba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Merritt Island, Fl.
    Posts
    2,546
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeanne View Post
    Just saw this thread just now -- interesting topic.

    I have a copy of Zarifa Aradoon's "The Belly Dance Costume Book" from 1978, and I think she has a section in it on symbology of colors in Arab cultures. I'm not at home right now, but I can look it up later and pass the list on. My guess is that the information is not hard and fast rules, as things do vary from place to place, but it's interesting as a general perspective.
    That would be very interesting - thank you!

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •