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  1. #11
    Moderator Darshiva's Avatar
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    Time to stop being hard on yourself. You're still so very new to this, of course your technique isn't perfect! Keep up the practice and take the encouragement of your troupemates to heart.

  2. #12
    Member Jeanne's Avatar
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    I like to mix up a variety of teaching techniques. I usually do some kind of technique drills as the first thing after warmup. After that, sometimes I teach a choreo, which might be a full song that we work on over several weeks, or a short combo for that night only, usually emphasizing whatever technique was drilled. Other times I like have a section for improv practice or some silly fun thing.

  3. #13
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    No one dances to the best of his or her ability all the time. And you know what? At less than a year, you may well be dancing to the best of your ability at this point. I suspect you are not dancing to the best of your expectations for yourself, which is something completely different. It isn't your self-confidence involved here- it's your ego and I say that in the most compassionate way that I can. Self-confidence says, "I can learn to do this; I can improve." Ego says, "If I'm not the best, nothing else matters."

    Technique will come with practice. Give up your fear, curtail your ego, and start seeking the joy of the movements, the music, and your companions while you practice. Joyful dance without technique may be sloppy but technique without joy is exercise.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

  4. #14
    V.I.P. da Sage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leighqt View Post
    I find myself in a bit of a dilema , hence why I ask.

    I have only been dancing between 6 and 8 months.

    what I am finding is that I don't feel 100 percent on technique as well as trying to learn various Chreography.

    for me personally as a person, if I am going to do something I want to do it to the best of my ability, not sort of bumble along, I want to become a good dancer and fear by dancing nowhere near the best of my ability, it is bad not only for my self confidence, reputation but also that of my troupe, that said I do practice and don't want to let the troupe down, , but I am really not enjoying it..

    any advice will be great and appreciated
    It sounds like you would enjoy some technique/drilling-heavy classes. If you like your current teacher, perhaps she has another class that does more drill work, or you could book her for a private lesson or two.

    It is okay to sample or change to another teacher if you just feel lost or like you're not making much progress. But it can be even more useful to stay with the same teacher and supplement her classes with classes from a teacher who does things a little differently (not too differently, or it will get confusing).

  5. #15
    Senior Member walladah's Avatar
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    plus musicality, expression etc.

    I think that each class or lesson cycle can have different content, but the important thing is that choreography only is not enough. Many world famous teachers, even when they teach choreos they start with drilling the most important or difficult parts of it, to make sure people get the technique first and then combine everything into a choreo.

    Of course, this depends on the level of students or the aim of the class, f.ex. workshop, preparation for a show, technique improvement, learning a specific dance style.

    Other times a dance style deoes not permit choreo-focus, f.ex. baladi or folk types of bellydance. THen the choreo might be simple or inexistent or you learn combinations to be used freely with a more or less non-choreographed song.

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