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  1. #11
    Moderator Daimona's Avatar
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    Oh, yes. Cultural differences indeed.
    A social catalyst is important both to keep new recruits as well as too keep the older ones, particularly if there are many introverts and shy people in the group.
    And if class time is limited, a coach in the corner of the dressing room where you wait before class or have breaks at the workshops will also be helpful.

    My local dance club usually invite all performers of a show to enjoy a dinner (at their own cost) after each show. Other hangarounds are welcome too, although the dinner isn't announced outside the performer/arranger group. It is a very nice way to end the evening and you get to know your fellow performer, both for newcomers and experienced dancers.
    --
    Daim.

  2. #12
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    I've always taught belly dance as a social phenomenon and that has worked well over the years. My idea of hell is a class full of self-centered soloists.

    Roshanna, you could run but could not hide from this group. They'd let you cower in the back for a while but sooner or later, they'd coax you forward.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

  3. #13
    Moderator Farasha Hanem's Avatar
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    BAAAAH, HAHAHAHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA xD

  4. #14
    Premium Member Aniseteph's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roshanna View Post
    ... all morris dancers are keenly aware of the need to retain new recruits to keep the tradition going. Also, our practises are more anarchic than bellydance classes, with no single clear leader or teacher, which lends itself to everyone feeling some responsibility for welcoming people. I've been wondering a lot over the last year how the bellydance world could be made more like this socially - especially when so many teachers seem to struggle with student retention.
    Excellent point. It's grassroots hobbyists and new students that keep things alive locally, and IMO the By Us For Us angle could be a huge asset. There needs to be an accessible friendly Us though - I'm not sure we have one here. There's a bunch of regulars at one hafla, but it's not easy to get to and there isn't a group ethos going on IMO.

    When I started going to belly dance events outside class I never felt it was especially welcoming or unwelcoming - I was getting enough out of it not to care. Nowadays I think I'd feel pretty put off, not being a wannabe pro, a teacher, or someone in a troupe.

    Shanazel your group sounds great. I might be hiding under the table at the back with Roshanna for a bit, but it sounds like a genuine group vibe, and I'd emerge from the table once the shock wore off.

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