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  1. #1
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    Default Dance Ethnology Careers?

    What can be done with a degree in Dance Ethnology?

  2. #2
    Moderator Daimona's Avatar
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    Good question. The only dance ethnologist I know is Helene Eriksen.
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  3. #3
    V.I.P. Ariadne's Avatar
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    Teach?

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    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    Law school?
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

  5. #5
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    So I guess this means I should look for other grad school options...

  6. #6
    Moderator Daimona's Avatar
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    I would guess some natural career paths could included both teaching and research if you are interested in being part of the academic world, but I don't know where you live and if there is a market for dance ethnologists or not as I'm not one myself.

    Why don't you find one or more dance ethnologists and ask about their careers before you decide?
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  7. #7
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    One can pursue one's passion without going into student debt to do it and incidentally emerging from grad school with limited or no marketable skills.

    I am an expert in a field that 99.999% of the world doesn't even know is a field. I write, I teach, I produce in this field but I cannot make a living working solely in this field. So I've made a living as a range conservationist, a paralegal, and a museum manager, among other things. I don't regret making an independent study of my passion nor do I regret developing marketable skills to support myself while pursuing my passion.

    The only drawback to not having a degree in my esoteric field is that some museums view askance independent researchers (those unaffiliated with a university program and/or do not have the proper sequence of letters after their names). It makes getting access to collections more challenging but not insurmountable.

    This doesn't answer your question- only you can do that- but perhaps it will give you something else to think about.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the response. I feel better knowing I can do independent research without having to get a MA or Ph.D.

  9. #9
    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
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    If you don't actually want to work in the field, can it not be used like most liberal arts degrees - ie as evidence of the ability to think, study and organize? I doubt if most people with literature degrees actually then work with literature or art history students end up in museums. However, you won't be able to get a job as an engineer or scientst :-)

  10. #10
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    When our children were old enough to start thinking about higher education, we told them we'd support them in whatever field they chose to pursue BUT! first they had to learn a trade. We didn't care what trade as long as they developed a usable skill and appreciation for skilled labor. Our son started framing houses at 15. Later he worked as a cowboy and volunteer fire fighter. Our daughter learned to weld and run a coffee shop. Today, he is a fire fighter who pursues a passion for hunting and fishing. She is in the police academy. Her passion is travel. Fulfilling "regular" jobs can also make possible the pursuit of passions.
    "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn " if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you."

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