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  1. #11
    V.I.P. Reen.Blom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janaki View Post
    I just remembered these

    Leg shimmy = egyptian shimmy
    twist shimmy = washing machine shimmy
    choo choo shimmy = chinese shimmy


    Cheers
    Janaki
    Hey Janaki would you include a brief descrpiption of what each move is?(Since might become a glossary...LOL)

    What is Choo choo shimmy? Is it the one that is done on the toes?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by janaki View Post
    I agree with you Reen.blom. Hope we can compile our own belly dance glossory. My contribution

    Forward fig 8 - turkish fig 8???
    Backward fig 8 - egyptian fig 8
    vertical fig 8 - fish
    reverse veritcal fig 8 - maya

    Cheers
    Janaki
    I absolutely love the maya...That is one move I want to learn to do very well.

  3. #13
    V.I.P. janaki's Avatar
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    Yes choo choo shimmy is done on the toes!!!!

    Leg shimmy/egyptian shimmy : flapping your knees back and forth to create the shimmy.

    Washing machine/twist shimmy: Twisting the right and left hips (alternating) forward and back. This can be done twisting forward and centre also!!!!

    Cheers
    Janaki

  4. #14
    V.I.P. Reen.Blom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KuteNurse View Post
    I absolutely love the maya...That is one move I want to learn to do very well.
    I agree KuteNurse I love it too!! It is stunning! I think it could be my favourite move...LOL

    Thank you Janaki for the explanation!(I wasnt to sure about the washing machine...LOL)

    I have another question: Is 3/4 shimmy a real shimmy? Or is it just a kind of step? Is there another name for it??

  5. #15
    V.I.P. janaki's Avatar
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    Good question reen.blom!!!

    3/4 shimmy is also called travelling shimmy. This can be done fast and slow, stationary as well as travelling.

    In my opinion it needs to be done fast to call it a shimmy. If I do the 3/4 shimmy slowly, I would call it 3/4 shimmy accents ( my own terminlogy).

    PS: We all know that shimmy means fast vibrations. Any move to be called shimmy, has to have certain speed!!!

    Cheers
    Janaki

  6. #16
    V.I.P. Reen.Blom's Avatar
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    WOW I would love to see someone do it really fast! So far from what I have seen it looked more like a step/stationary move but it did not look like we normally imagine a shimmy!

  7. #17
    Premium Member sausanacademy's Avatar
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    Default Taxiems

    Taxiems can be slow as well as fast musical improvisations, with or without beats in the background. So that there is no confusion, when I teach my Tertiary Course on the Entities of Classic Egyptian Music, I refer to these "slow taxiem" parts as soliloquies; a section of the music where one must put one's soul and heart on the line and express oneself through the movement of the music. These parts, in my school of thought, cannot be choreographed.

    I have found that there are three kinds or types of soliloquies, each with or without beats. The three I have identified are the Soft Soliloquy, the Mean (Medium) Soliloquy, and the Firm Soliloquy. Each has its own movement expression. Once these types of soliloquies are identified, my students have no problem performing to them. And, when approached using the "rule of thumb" movement, which I teach to each kind of soliloquy, my students understand how to perform movement to these soliloquies or "taxiem" sections of the music without any fear or apprehension. :-)

    -Sausan
    Sausan Academy of Egyptian Dance
    Last edited by sausanacademy; 06-15-2007 at 07:26 AM.

  8. #18
    Member SmilingMarie's Avatar
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    re 3/4 shimmies/travelling shimmies - I have heard and would use hagala and egypt walk - but I am not sure whether some of you would distinguish between these - as is clear from this thread, terminology varies!

  9. #19
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    I guess it's just like anything else....different terminology for different styles of teaching and for different teachers...

    I think this thread is a good idea, so we can learn the similarities and differences in the terms!!!

    Great idea


    -MiaMi


    Nutcracker Tryouts | The Nutcracker Ballet

  10. #20
    V.I.P. Reen.Blom's Avatar
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    Big Grin

    Quote Originally Posted by sausanacademy View Post
    Taxiems can be slow as well as fast musical improvisations, with or without beats in the background. So that there is no confusion, when I teach my Tertiary Course on the Entities of Classic Egyptian Music, I refer to these "slow taxiem" parts as soliloquies; a section of the music where one must put one's soul and heart on the line and express oneself through the movement of the music. These parts, in my school of thought, cannot be choreographed.

    I have found that there are three kinds or types of soliloquies, each with or without beats. The three I have identified are the Soft Soliloquy, the Mean (Medium) Soliloquy, and the Firm Soliloquy. Each has its own movement expression. Once these types of soliloquies are identified, my students have no problem performing to them. And, when approached using the "rule of thumb" movement, which I teach to each kind of soliloquy, my students understand how to perform movement to these soliloquies or "taxiem" sections of the music without any fear or apprehension. :-)

    -Sausan
    Sausan Academy of Egyptian Dance
    Thank you Susan! This is very informative!

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