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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Didi View Post
    "It is learning at the best speed it can, and it can do amazing things with time and patience."

    I like that quote, Didi. It makes me feel, if not alot, a little better about myself.

  2. #12
    V.I.P. Reen.Blom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cathy View Post
    I am not a dance teacher but the way I was taught hip drops and hip lifts is very simple compared to what you are describing and compared to what is shown on this clip. Furthermore, it is probably less tiring to all parts of me--and less tiring to the knees--than walking at the same pace. If five drops hurts your knees I think you are doing something incorrectly. My teacher always says this dance should never hurt and if you are in pain you are doing something wrong.

    The way I was taught hip drops is start with soft knees, starting from neutral (hips level) drop one side then return to neutral. No angling, swiveling or turning. It's more of a release down. It's kind of like dribbling a basketball. Think about it bouncing to its lowest point on the beat. If you like to count think 1-2-3-4 when it "touches" the lowest point. Then the other side. The way my teacher describes it, you don't lift to drop--that means you don't lift above neutral, you don't draw "into" the spine or anything else. Just neutral, down, neutral, down.

    As for lifts, it's very similar. Start with soft knees, from neutral (hips level) swing one side up and return to neutral. Again, no angling or swiveling or turning, just lift, neutral, lift, neutral. Now you can think of the basketball (your hip) "touching" on the up swing. If you like to count to the beat, think of the hip "touching" its highest point on the beat.

    Just remember, don't lift to drop or drop to lift. Go from neutral to either drop or lift. They are different movements--don't combine the two or you look off rhythm. That will get you the clearest, simplest, and easiest-to perform-maintain movement and should never hurt.

    Good luck.

    Cathy
    Thanks Cathy! I suppose this is just another variant of it! Neon on her DVDs even teaches the hip lift/drops with a twist to emphasize the move!

  3. #13
    Member Ravenhairedbellydancer's Avatar
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    thanx didi!! thats very inspiring

  4. #14
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    like already mentioned, same move can be accomplished through different mechanics. this helps in future purposes of layering and movement.

    practice doing the hip lift as a gentle, slow knee pump, as an abdominal contraction, as a thigh push, and a tush push.

    when i practice i do my hip lift/drop using push-pull. the move has a very controlled, muscular look to it. for example abdominals/obliques pull the hip up and in WHILE the tush adds push for reinforcement.

    the mechanics or manner of execution all depends on where you put your body weight. experiment with all different ways, they are all right and can all be useful later on.

    plus with the push-pull method it works as isometric contractions do. its a workout, you are fine tuning your muscular control for other uses and with other moves.

    for example if execute very muscular push-pull rib circles (up-back-down-center) the progression into camels will be much easier. if you continuously practice the camel or body wave with constant isometric contractions and muscular control it is the natural progression to a belly roll.

    same is true for hip lifts/drops and hip downs. execute them with extreme muscular control and simultaneously you are training your body in muscle memory, control, and strength for shimmies. especially when you do them on flat foot.

    i think that if you maintain proper posture and experiment with body weight you will find several ways to accomplish the same task and it will all be right.

  5. #15
    Member Ravenhairedbellydancer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by charity View Post
    practice doing the hip lift as a gentle, slow knee pump, as an abdominal contraction, as a thigh push, and a tush push.

    .
    Thanx, this is helpful but do all of these executions work for a hip drop or lift separately?

  6. #16
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    yes

  7. #17
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    when you do the push-pull for the drop reverse it. tush pulls down, abdominals thrust down. for knee pump you "pop" opposite knee straight without locking and squeeze opposite glute, etc etc...and with the thigh, yes that works too, just imagine lengthening the thigh...

    the other drop is simply a release, you let your hip roll back down into place, there is no work to it except to let your foot twist slightly out.

  8. #18
    Member Didi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chloe View Post
    I like that quote, Didi. It makes me feel, if not alot, a little better about myself.
    I'm glad, Chloe.

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