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  1. #11
    Member tim ema's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ravenhairedbellydancer View Post
    ......its funny no one ever refers to a long butt but i've got one, long and wide .............. i think im gonna schedule and appt with a chiropractor soon....
    LOLOL!!! Sorry, I just HAD to respond! I have the SAME BUTT!
    I've always joked that I have no butt, just a REEAAALLLY long back that's cracked at the bottom! LOL!

    As to the chiropractor, I am a huge advocate of chiropractors - but find the right one. My chiropractor wouldn't even agree to take me unless I was willing to commit to Xrays (so he could SEE my problems), exercises (and he tests my strength and resistance every few months to make SURE I'm doing them) etc.
    I've been going to chiropractors all my life and only NOW have I seen HUGE improvements. The right Doc makes all the difference.


    AT
    Last edited by tim ema; 08-01-2006 at 08:57 AM. Reason: typo

  2. #12
    Senior Member sedoniaraqs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ravenhairedbellydancer View Post
    Yasmine, Typically, lordosis is not racial BUT it has been found to be something much more common in Africans and I do get it from the African side of my family, African men and women both have lordosis and also have large buttocks and the lordosis only accentuates the large glutes.
    I have observed this correlation between an apparent swayback and large glutes; it does seem to be a more common body type in blacks, but I have also seen whites and Latinas with this shape. I have also noticed that if it is severe, it really throws up an obstacle with respect to doing the more intricate hipwork in oriental dance, because the dancer isn't achieving a "neutral" pelvis.

    So anyway, I have a theory that is totally untested and may be total BS but here it is for your perusal.

    In the weight training world, you will hear the terms "easy-gainer" and "hard-gainer". Easy-gainers are people who can gain muscle mass relatively quickly and hard-gainers are those who can't. Most people, especially women, tend to be hard-gainers.

    Any rapid gain in muscle mass or strength may cause a loss of flexibility *if* flexibility training is not done concurrently with the strength-building. Easy-gainers may be more susceptible to losing flexibility since they can build muscle more easily.

    So, I wonder if people who have the swayback/large glute body type are people who are "easy-gainers" (at least with respect to the lower-body muscles), for whom increases in these muscles happen easily/quickly and thus loss of flexibility can happen easily and quickly also. Tightness in the hams and glutes (relative to the abs and hip flexors)could cause/contribute to the swayback.

    I wonder if some serious flexibility training (for example, pilates and stretching) focusing on increasing range of motion in the hamstrings and glutes while at the same time building core strength, couldn't resolve the problem.

    Sedonia

  3. #13
    V.I.P. Yasmine Bint Al Nubia's Avatar
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    In that case I'm definitely an "easy-gainer", I put on muscle fairly quickly and have to balance it out with Pilates to maintain flexibility. But what we perceive to be a problem is often an advantage even in Oriental dance. I'm African-American, I believe my glutes are just right for me, I have a lot of power in my shimmies as well as endurance and stamina.
    As far as lordosis being common in people with African or Hispanic heritage, remember, it is a condition that involves a severe curve in the lower back and many non-medical people become confused when they see someone with a "big butt" and say thay have lordosis. The spine has three natural curves at the cervical (neck area), thoracic(ribcage/abdominal area) and lumbar/sacral(lower back) area. The tucking of the pelvis actually removes the natural curve on the lower spine so that movements in Oriental Dance creates a different look. Most teachers do not understand enough about anatomy, so they often have a student "overtuck" their pelvis just to create lengthened look. IMO this can be harmful for a student who in fact is not truly swayback. Regardless of our ethnic heritage, it is important to have a flexible lower back and learn exercises so we do not injure ourselves even in every day activities. Yasmine

  4. #14
    Senior Member sedoniaraqs's Avatar
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    You are right, Yasmine, I'm not really talking about someone with very severe lordosis, although those students too, would be helped by specific flexibility training and exercise to mitigate the lordosis.

    But I am saying that some milder cases of pelvic misalignment may be caused by tight glutes, hams, and lower back muscles, and that this tightness seems be more common in folks with large booty muscles.

    When I look at student's postural alignment, I don't look at how far their butts stick out, I'm looking more at the front of their pelvic region, if that looks tilted down. Since flesh can obscure this too, I have students check their pelvic alignment by feeling for the most prominent point of their hipbones and the most prominent point of their pubis. These three points should define a plane that is perpendicular to the ground. If its tilted one way or another the pelvis may be swayed back, or less commonly tucked too much.

    If students have a swayback that they cannot easily fix in class, I usually don't harp on them to tuck more and more, because the "tucking" shouldn't involve alot of force or effort. But I do recommend they consult with a physical therapist and/or double up on their stretching outside of class using safe stretching techniques. I also recommend pilates as cross-training, but few students are committed enough to make that kind of time commitment.

    Sedonia

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