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  1. #11
    V.I.P. Tarik Sultan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SaraKat View Post
    Another way to practice flat-footed hip work is to curl your toes off the floor. This way it's impossible to use your heels. This is a trick you can use to access the muscles you will need to use. Once you have found them you should go back to standing normally.
    I couldn't agree more about keeping the knees bent, especially if you want to get anything other than a tiny tiny maya (which are nice too of course).
    Never thought of that one. I'll try it with my new students and see how it works.

  2. #12
    V.I.P. Yasmine Bint Al Nubia's Avatar
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    I love this forum!!!! So many great ideas and suggestions, I'm sure that most of us are assuming you are in basic dance position before performing the maya. Make sure your lower back is protected with a small tuck(this also engages your lower abs). Trying to do a maya with a 'duck butt' puts too much strain on your lower back.
    Yasmine

  3. #13
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    yes yes yes to all of the above (I too advocate working the weighted hip, & curly toes... if the student just can't keep those heels on the floor)...
    but I ALWAYS make em learn it flat footed 1st... like I said earlier... that way they can do the "hard" way AND the "easy" way...
    it makes sure they are using the correct muscles/etc.
    HOWEVER for my more advanced students .... we maya flat footed/on releve/descending/ascending/on the knees/doing back flips/etc..... with the movement being "driven" from the hips/obliques rather than the lifted heel, it is easy to do in any position

  4. #14
    Senior Member sedoniaraqs's Avatar
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    Once you can do the maya flat-footed, *then* you can use those same muscles and do variations that involve lifting the heel off the floor, for example with a level change starting in releve, or traveling with it, or doing it one sided like Randa Kamal does.

    Sedonia

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasmine Bint Al Nubia View Post
    I love this forum!!!! So many great ideas and suggestions, I'm sure that most of us are assuming you are in basic dance position before performing the maya. Make sure your lower back is protected with a small tuck(this also engages your lower abs). Trying to do a maya with a 'duck butt' puts too much strain on your lower back.
    Yasmine
    me too.. (love!!) OMG TOOO FUNNY.... I too use the phrase "duck butt"... also tell my students to LISTEN to their bodies... as even now YEARS later.. when maya-ing in performance... I feel my lower back "saying"... tuck your butt!!!!!

    AND the maya has toned my obiques like NOTHING else!!!!
    try it both tucked & untucked.... when tucked you can feel (& eventually see!!) it in your low abs/obliques!!!

  6. #16
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    Isn't "duck butt" a technical term?

    I start my students flat-footed on mayas for many of the same reasons listed above. I have also been known to have students belly up to the barre and stand flatfooted on one leg to practice movements that require movement from the hips and core rather than the heels and knees.

  7. #17
    Member Ravenhairedbellydancer's Avatar
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    LOL! very good tips,, unfortnately i am naturally very duck butted lol, i have a pretty strong sway back so i have to tuck more than some other ppl and im not sure how far to go sometimes, its really annoying..

  8. #18
    V.I.P. Aziyade's Avatar
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    Years of ballet couldn't rid me of my duck butt, but just a couple of years of bellydance did it.

    Raven, 99% of the stuff you're struggling with WILL COME with practice. And it will bigger (or smaller, depending) and more controlled the more you do it.

    I used to complain about my lack of torso flexibility until I talked to Rachel Brice who said she drills every day 50 torso slides right, 50 left, 50 chest lifts, 50 chest drops, etc. You have to work to BUILD UP a greater range of motion. It will happen if you practice and drill. I did, and it did.

    My students now sometimes say, "I'll NEVER have the torso movements you have!!" and I tell them the same story. But you can't expect it to happen overnight. You don't decide on Monday to start weight lifting, and then on Tuesday have big Popeye arms, you know?

    Make a list of the stuff you want to do better, or the areas where you would like more flexibility. Then make yourself a daily drill list. Or post your goals here, and we'll help you put together a daily drills list. Then, do the drills daily. After 30 days you'll be amazed. I'm SERIOUS!

  9. #19
    V.I.P. Tarik Sultan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aziyade View Post
    Years of ballet couldn't rid me of my duck butt, but just a couple of years of bellydance did it.

    Raven, 99% of the stuff you're struggling with WILL COME with practice. And it will bigger (or smaller, depending) and more controlled the more you do it.

    I used to complain about my lack of torso flexibility until I talked to Rachel Brice who said she drills every day 50 torso slides right, 50 left, 50 chest lifts, 50 chest drops, etc. You have to work to BUILD UP a greater range of motion. It will happen if you practice and drill. I did, and it did.

    My students now sometimes say, "I'll NEVER have the torso movements you have!!" and I tell them the same story. But you can't expect it to happen overnight. You don't decide on Monday to start weight lifting, and then on Tuesday have big Popeye arms, you know?

    Make a list of the stuff you want to do better, or the areas where you would like more flexibility. Then make yourself a daily drill list. Or post your goals here, and we'll help you put together a daily drills list. Then, do the drills daily. After 30 days you'll be amazed. I'm SERIOUS!
    This is such an important point. Most people get bummed out if they try something and don't get it the first try. You have to build up to things. Its not an event, but a process.

  10. #20
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    i also do the toe lifting thing but i feel its been a very hard habit to break and it puts more weight in the heels than i would like. i feel the more weight in the heels the more the movement will come from the glutes. for me, i want to isolate the moves in the obliques instead so that the glutes are free for layering.

    and i have found that- like someone suggested- doing the maya on relleve helps a lot. because then you realize it is essential to keep knees bent or you will not be able to accomplish the move. also to emphasize proper technique i stretch arms up over head, it lengthens/tightens the abdominals and obliques so that you can really feel the pull in the right spot when you have isolated the move.

    and once you do this return to center but on the flats of your feet,stand with one foot slightly in front of the other and raise up from flat foot to relleve and then back down from relleve to flat foot. kind of like lifting up to the sky and sinking down into the ground. then switch the feet where the other is slightly in front. hope i explained it right...perhaps someone else can explain better.

    just keep with it and you will get it. i also think the one sided maya might help to get your grounding situated first. then you can put the two pieces together. and perhaps illuminate the problem because i think it may be in the crossing over that the heels tend to lift up in which case you need to try using the obliques more.

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