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  1. #1
    Moderator Amulya's Avatar
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    Default Workshop Etiquette

    This is such a good topic I had to cross-post it.
    What do you think are good 'rules' for in workshops?

    Some examples from that thread:

    -let people rotate so everybody gets a chance at a good spot
    -cell phones off
    -no coin belts (lots of people are annoyed by the sound, personally I don't care)
    -don't wear very strong smelling perfumes, deodorants (makes some people sneeze!)
    -getting in late
    -avoid getting bad BO

    I'd add: don't be a diva (teachers or student ) I have seen that too much.

  2. #2
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    Another thing with coin hipscarfs besides the sound is that the strings might break, and there's the risk of someone stepping on little glass beads barefooted... definitely a consideration.

  3. #3
    V.I.P. Moon's Avatar
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    what is a BO?

    I would add:

    - don't start chatting with your friends/other people at workshop while the teacher is explaining something
    - don't wear see-through stuff (or is that go under "don't be a diva")
    - don't start showing off more than necessary when you find out your level is higher than that of the others (also "diva"?)
    - teachers: don't interact too long with people who try to chat with you. Ofcourse everyone should have fun but the lesson should also continue!
    Last edited by Moon; 10-22-2007 at 02:34 PM.

  4. #4
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Workshop

    Dear Amulya,

    And for teachers:

    REMEMBER THAT THE CLASS IS ABOUT THE DANCE AND THE STUDENTS, NOT ABOUT YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    DO recognize that every person in the class is an individual, just like in your regular classes.

    DO NOT confuse demonstrating movement with teaching it.

    DO consistently remind students that dance is more than movement, that movement is the beginning of the dance process but not the entirety of it.

    DO start the class on time and teach for the promised length of the workshop.

    DO acknowledge that workshops should be of a reasonable length ( even if this cuts into your profits), so that students can actually absorb and retain the material taught. 5 hours is WAY TOO LONG for the average dancer to muddle through a class.

    DO NOT assume about the level of dance ability in the class and make sure you have something to offer everyone.


    I teach teachers to teach and these are some of the things that I teach in my workshop. I believe in teaching from a place of Student Awareness, meaning that teachers need to be teaching for the benefit of the student and gear each part of the workshop to the purpose of helping the student, ON AN INDIVIDUAL LEVEL, to enhance their dance ability in some way. This sounds so very obvious, but from what I hear and see, it is not. I have wasted literally thousands of dollars on lousy workshops. I really, REALLY resent that.
    Regards,
    A'isha

  5. #5
    Moderator Shanazel's Avatar
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    Body odor, Moon.


    1. Don't monopolize the teacher or bog down the class with constant questions and comments

    2. Let the teacher rest during her breaks instead of using them as an opportunity to try and squeeze in some one on one time

    3. Don't argue with the teacher's methods- accept what you wish of her teaching and let the other parts flow out of your brain without insisting on vocalizing your objections.

  6. #6
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    [QUOTE=Shanazel;48587]

    1. Don't monopolize the teacher or bog down the class with constant questions and comments

    Oooh, yes! Being in a workshop with a student who loves the sound of her own voice...

  7. #7
    Moderator Amulya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A'isha Azar View Post
    DO acknowledge that workshops should be of a reasonable length ( even if this cuts into your profits), so that students can actually absorb and retain the material taught. 5 hours is WAY TOO LONG for the average dancer to muddle through a class.
    Workshops in Australia (well in some parts) are often only 2 hours. That is not really long enough to learn a whole choreography.
    In Holland workshops were always 4 hours, when a teacher from abraod teaches(not sure if it's still like that). It good ware for your money, but it's LONG.

  8. #8
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    Arrive on time and if it was bookings only, do not bring your friend, her sister and cousin along and then get miffed if they are turned away.
    If there is a change room, try to use it. Especially if you are going to strip but-naked -if there isn't a change areas please dont stand opposite the main door while changing!!!!
    When taking a break, finish your eating outside - slipping on icecream drops is not fun.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Ranya's Avatar
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    For organisers:
    Consider the nature of the workshop for the amount of students you let in. If there is just enough space for 40 people for a raks sharki workshop, 40 people with ASSAYA might not get the same benefit of a workshop in the same room (had one like this this summer, at the end we just imagined that we areholding the assaya, otherwise people around me would get black-eyes...and so would I).

  10. #10
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Workshop length

    Quote Originally Posted by Amulya View Post
    Workshops in Australia (well in some parts) are often only 2 hours. That is not really long enough to learn a whole choreography.
    In Holland workshops were always 4 hours, when a teacher from abraod teaches(not sure if it's still like that). It good ware for your money, but it's LONG.
    Dear Amulya,
    A very long time ago now, I decided to look into what is considered the optimum length of time for a person to study for maximum benefit. I did not find anything on dance, but in general, people are at their peak when they study for about 3 hours. After that, they tend to retain less and are not at optimum learning levels any more. I teach 3 hour workshops for that reason and usually there is a 10-15 minute break at the mid-point for people to catch their breath, get water, take extra notes or ask questions. It seems to work out well and students generally don't leave so exhausted that they can't remember anything. Most people seem to need technique more, I have noticed. I do include a few suggestions for phrasing, using the stuff they just learned in with more familiar things. I LOVE teaching and try to gear my classes and workshops to individual needs as much as possible.
    I also do not usually teach a choreography in workshops because I don't think its possible for most people to retain. the info in one class.
    Regards,
    A'isha

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