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  1. #31
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    A'isha-

    Oh my that is drastic! I would not want to do that to anyone. Still, there have been occasions I have seen that are beyond the pale.

  2. #32
    Member TribalDancer's Avatar
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    I guess what I am saying is that, while the terminology "stealing" may be a semantic discussion, I think we may be able to all agree that actively trying to promote to other people's students *specifically* can be considered rude and ethically questionable. In the same way as a restaurant going and putting flyers in another restaurant would be, as in my example.

  3. #33
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Stealing,etc.

    Dear Sharon,
    On that we are in agreement. It is unethical to purposely solicit other peoples' students, especially on their home turf.
    Now, how do people feel about sending flyers to other people's students about your events, or putting up an event flyer in places where other people teach belly dance. Do the same ethics apply, especiallly if you KNOW the other teacher will never inform her students about other peoples' events?
    Regards,
    A'isha

  4. #34
    Member TribalDancer's Avatar
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    I consider THAT a community service. Flyers about events open to everyone, and meant as entertainment (or edutatainment) should be available to everyone anytime, IMO.

    It pisses me off to hear about teachers who won't keep their students in the loop! To an extent it is the student's responsibility to find information for themselves, but to HIDE information, or discourage the seekign of it...chaps my hide!!

  5. #35
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Stealing, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by TribalDancer View Post
    I consider THAT a community service. Flyers about events open to everyone, and meant as entertainment (or edutatainment) should be available to everyone anytime, IMO.

    It pisses me off to hear about teachers who won't keep their students in the loop! To an extent it is the student's responsibility to find information for themselves, but to HIDE information, or discourage the seekign of it...chaps my hide!!

    Dear Sharon,
    That would be my take on it,too. Even if I really detest the sponsor or the presenter, it is not up to me to make decisions about who my students choose to study with. I give out info and if they ask my opinion, I will tell them. If I think the dancer is superb and not to be missed, I will tell them outright. However, I think teachers that do this are pretty rare. I think it seems to be more common, at least in my neck of the woods that teachers do not inform their students of other peoples' events. As soon as anyone sends me flyers, I let my students know what is going on. If they send me enough to pass around, I do so.
    Regards,
    A'isha

  6. #36
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    This is something I find interesting because I am a strings teacher (violin, viola, cello and double bass). With instrumental teaching - particularly strings - it is considered a distinct disadvantage to have multiple teachers. Different teachers use different methods, styles, books, technique and have varying speeds.

    This can make it incredibly confusing and often puts people right off when they have two teachers, unless of course the teachers have some kind of arrangement as to who teaches what.

    In dancing, it seems that learning with multiple teachers actually broadens your horizons and develops your technique further!

    That really fascinates me!

    xxx

  7. #37
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Dance

    Quote Originally Posted by starletvonsparkle View Post
    This is something I find interesting because I am a strings teacher (violin, viola, cello and double bass). With instrumental teaching - particularly strings - it is considered a distinct disadvantage to have multiple teachers. Different teachers use different methods, styles, books, technique and have varying speeds.

    This can make it incredibly confusing and often puts people right off when they have two teachers, unless of course the teachers have some kind of arrangement as to who teaches what.

    In dancing, it seems that learning with multiple teachers actually broadens your horizons and develops your technique further!

    That really fascinates me!

    xxx

    Dear Starlet,
    I consider it to be a disadvantage when you are learning fundamentals, but after a person has 8 months or so under their belt, why not study with different teachers? Because beginning teachers teach things in such different ways, it is important to explain to students that you have your effective method and so do other instructors, and that it might be best to learn the basics in one way, in preparation for further study with different teachers. I can see how learning basics from more than one teacher might be confusing.
    Regards,
    A'isha

  8. #38
    V.I.P. adiemus's Avatar
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    As a pianist and past player of clarinet, I think that initially it's good to have a
    single teacher - but it's very rare for someone more experienced (say, learning for 5 or 6 years, unless they're children) to remain solely with the same teacher. Learning an instrument with another teacher after the 'basics' are down develops range and extends the repertoire. Of course in classical music, there are some ways to check whether the teacher you use will teach 'good' technique - most teachers are licensed or at least have some qualification to show their skill level with a recognised school (eg Trinity College or Royal Academy). As far as I know the same things apply to ballet (well they did when I danced ballet!)
    In bellydance of most types there are few if any 'recognised' schools, and so the quality of what you learn could be quite variable. And once learned, it's so very difficult to change poor technique. Probably the basic for me is to be able to develop 'good' posture - some of the YouTube videos show really poor posture, and without good guidance, I'm sure it's nigh on impossible to know whether you're dancing with good posture!

    As for teachers not promoting dance performances or resources from other schools - well that's just being precious! Unless of course you're intending to promote a competing workshop or performance... Thankfully the teacher I have does promote other performances and workshops, but prefaces 'recommendations' with a discussion of what you might gain and what you might want to watch out for as being less helpful...

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