Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 54
  1. #41
    Moderator Safran's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Dubai, UAE
    Posts
    2,297
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A'isha Azar View Post
    Dear Gang,
    I have taught with and without mirrors and been a student with and without mirrors. I have found both jobs to be much easier with. When I teach workshops, I do everything I can to try to have the sponsor find us a locale with mirrors. I have had students come up to me after class and comment on how nice it was to have them, I also limit my workshop numbers to a manageable 30. It seems unfair to students to pack them into a place like sardines and then say, "Oh, learn this. with no feedback, no personal connection, no mirrors, no floor space, no acknowledgement of YOU as a single being and not a herd animal of some sort". I HATE THAT!!!!
    Regards,
    A'isha
    Sooo want to rep you on that, but apparently your cup is already running over with it

    As for mirrors, I like having mirrors to learn with at first. Especially, if there is a luxury to have mirrors on more than one side of the room. Of course, in order to really learn you also need your time facing the wall (or the "audience"). But, I personally do tend to rely on mirrors just as much as I rely on my teacher dancing in front of the class or the really good dancer who usually dances to the left of me.

  2. #42
    V.I.P. jenc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Colchester UK
    Posts
    2,124
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I am sure this does not apply to any of you, but I have experienced a teacher using the mirror as a substitute for feedback. We were set to do moves from one end of room (mirror) to other (mirror) and as beginners we should have had guidance to interpret what we saw.
    if only it had gone like this You need to improve X. Student tries it out and sees difference in mirror. Over the last few weeks I have learnt to evaluate what I see in a whole new way - and that has come from anaysis threough this forum - entirely without the use of mirrors.
    anyone think i deserve some reputation
    I wanted to put sticks tongue out as that's my fav but it's not there and I can't work out how to put smiley here and not at start :p

  3. #43
    V.I.P.
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,253
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    All I can say is that I will tell you how I feel when I have taught with them.
    Last edited by Brea; 02-27-2008 at 09:22 PM.

  4. #44
    V.I.P. Reen.Blom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Between Heaven and Earth Upside Down
    Posts
    3,708
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hey jenc : tongue :

  5. #45
    V.I.P. jenc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Colchester UK
    Posts
    2,124
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    :Thanks for the reputation guys I feel really one of you now
    Jen

  6. #46
    V.I.P. Jane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    In the mountains of Montana
    Posts
    2,220
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I like mirrors, but I agree they can become addicting! Because most of the time dance is a visual experience for an audience, I think beginner dancers need to see themselves just like beginner singers have to listen to their own voice.

    To break mirror addiction try facing away from the mirror and facing in other directions. If you normally dance N/S try E/W. Dance in a different floor spot. I notice sometimes when I know a choreography very well, I turn my brain off and follow another dancer on auto pilot. If she's not there in my site line, I have to think for myself and actively listen to the music. You can also close your eyes and concentrate on feeling the move within the body, then open them and see what it looks like in a mirror.

    Given a choice, I'd choose no mirrors over a crappy floor anyday.

  7. #47
    V.I.P. da Sage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,024
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I personally feel that mirrors (or video cameras) are very important to developing one's own style. I may be able to perfectly imitate my teacher (in my dreams!), but if her arm angle or degree of head tilt doesn't flatter me, that makes for ugly dancing on my part.

    Frankly, I am often torn...should I follow my teacher exactly, or modify the movement so that the dance looks prettier on me? I am trying to discipline myself to alter all details so that they work for me (whenever possible). This process is why I completely understand that some troupes stick with one body type...it's so one choreography looks good on everyone, without the minor differences in movement that can distract the eye.

    I think if you teach without mirrors, it's harder for beginning students to self-correct minor details. I am dancing more often without mirrors, now. When I do get in front of a mirror again, my movements aren't quite what I had expected. I feel I need to spend more time in front of a mirror to correct bad habits reinforced by practicing without a mirror.

    I know Rachel Brice practiced with a video camera for some time, instead of a mirror. She got exact feedback, but delayed. Has anyone tried this over an extended period, and how did you feel about the process?

  8. #48
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Pacific Northwest USA
    Posts
    5,313
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Video

    Dear DaSage,
    I know that for me, there is a sort of disconnect of some kind when I work with video as feedback, as in performance. It is like, since I am sitting there in the chair watching the video, I can not really be on the video at the same time,... or something. It's hard to explain, and I find myself emotionally removed from watching myself dance. Therefore, I don't get the whole picture, if that makes sense.
    On the other hand, in videos where I am teaching a workshop or class, I still feel very connected to the process, and I have less of a tendency to try to analyze what I am doing with a jaundiced eye, as I do when I see myself dancing.
    Regards,
    A'isha

  9. #49
    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,952
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brea View Post
    As I said, I see the value of mirrors for those above reasons, in a perfect world. Any advice on how to cut down on the distractedness? Some people, while watching themselves and doing fine, later on will be extremely confused because it seems they have learned with their eyes instead of their body...if that makes sense.
    One thing I sometimes do is get the students to do a move with their eyes closed. I call out "stop" and they compare what they thought they were doing with what the mirror tells them. Most useful for hand and foot positions.
    Last edited by Kashmir; 02-28-2008 at 03:37 AM.

  10. #50
    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,952
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Moon View Post
    My teacher who teaches without mirrors is a very good dancer and wonderful teacher. I have never seen people in her class being "lost without a mirror". I was used to dance with a mirror before I started taking lessons with her and it took me half an hour to even notice there were no mirrors. Her style of teaching is very different from most teachers, that might make the difference?
    So no drilling and polishing technique? Even with raw beginners, I'll put them in front of a mirror so they can see what their hips are doing. Many have little awareness of whether their hip is going up or out. If they look in the mirror they can get instant feedback.

    But sometimes I need to be the mirror. I'll say you are doing xyz - they'll look and say "huh?" I'll say look at the mirror and they'll say I'm doing it right. I then try and reproduce what they were doing followed by what I want. Often that breaks through. So sometimes the eyes don't know what to look for.

    With a choreography there also comes the time to reveal who hasn't learnt the steps but has been using the mirror to follow someone else. So it's backs to the mirror - also throws out other cues they won't have in a real performance.
    Last edited by Kashmir; 02-28-2008 at 03:39 AM.

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •