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    V.I.P. jenc's Avatar
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    Default Time to move on?

    Went to a Hafla last night organised by my old teacher. 2 of her students who have been dancing in her troupe for 5 or so years both soloed for the first time. What a revelation. Previously, they have seemed either technically competent but expressionless, or just not that good. As soloists they were lovely, and they also had different styles to their teacher, which we found out for the first time.

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    it does sound like they may have outgrown the tutor a little and need to see whats its like to perform without her.

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    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Dancers growth

    Quote Originally Posted by jenc View Post
    Went to a Hafla last night organised by my old teacher. 2 of her students who have been dancing in her troupe for 5 or so years both soloed for the first time. What a revelation. Previously, they have seemed either technically competent but expressionless, or just not that good. As soloists they were lovely, and they also had different styles to their teacher, which we found out for the first time.

    Dear Jen,
    I think that one thing that a good teacher does not do is to produce clones of herself. Often, when people are doing rigid choreographies, they do indeed look expressionless because they are too busy trying to remember a choreography. This is especially true of newer dancers, and five years is very new. the fact that they are good soloists is a credit to their instructor, as far as I am concerned. She has obviously been able to impart to them some valuable skills. That being said, my theory of teaching is that the teacher is 10% responsible for how a dancer turns out and the dancer herself is 90% responsible for using the tools the instructor has given them!!
    Regards,
    A'isha

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    V.I.P. da Sage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenc View Post
    Went to a Hafla last night organised by my old teacher. 2 of her students who have been dancing in her troupe for 5 or so years both soloed for the first time. What a revelation. Previously, they have seemed either technically competent but expressionless, or just not that good. As soloists they were lovely, and they also had different styles to their teacher, which we found out for the first time.
    They may or may not have outgrown the teacher (and the troupe), but it sounds as though they now realize they can perform well by themselves.

    I always am torn between developing my strengths, and improving my weaknesses. It takes a lot of dedication to do both consistently.

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    Quote Originally Posted by A'isha Azar View Post
    Dear Jen,
    I think that one thing that a good teacher does not do is to produce clones of herself. Often, when people are doing rigid choreographies, they do indeed look expressionless because they are too busy trying to remember a choreography. This is especially true of newer dancers, and five years is very new. the fact that they are good soloists is a credit to their instructor, as far as I am concerned. She has obviously been able to impart to them some valuable skills. That being said, my theory of teaching is that the teacher is 10% responsible for how a dancer turns out and the dancer herself is 90% responsible for using the tools the instructor has given them!!
    Regards,
    A'isha
    LOVE that 90%----10% rule.... SOOOO true!!!
    also the fact that they are NOT like their teacher in solo tends to be a GOOD reflection on the teacher....

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    Quote Originally Posted by da Sage View Post
    They may or may not have outgrown the teacher (and the troupe), but it sounds as though they now realize they can perform well by themselves.

    I always am torn between developing my strengths, and improving my weaknesses. It takes a lot of dedication to do both consistently.
    I ALWAYS tell my students that...to work on their weaknesses... BUT also to work on what they are good at... usually if you work on both, you end up being extra fab in your strong areas... and at least average in your bad areas.... (better than embarrassing yourself!!!)
    BUT,,,, you never know...
    what I thought was my WEAK area, when I 1st started, actually (10 yrs later!) turned out to be one of my stronger areas..... cause I worked so hard??? hmmmm

  7. #7
    V.I.P. jenc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by belly_dancer View Post
    I ALWAYS tell my students that...to work on their weaknesses... BUT also to work on what they are good at... usually if you work on both, you end up being extra fab in your strong areas... and at least average in your bad areas.... (better than embarrassing yourself!!!)
    BUT,,,, you never know...
    what I thought was my WEAK area, when I 1st started, actually (10 yrs later!) turned out to be one of my stronger areas..... cause I worked so hard??? hmmmm
    I can relate to that. everything came naturally to me at school. I never worked and exam results were average. Then I failed Economics in my foundation year. I worked hard before resit and ended with a high enough score to do a degree!

    Seriously, we have had sevreal posts from people who feel that they are quuicker at getting stuff than other students. That means practice really hard and you could be really good. Rely on natural ability and you will not develop.

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    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Student, etc.

    Dear Jen,

    Seriously, we have had sevreal posts from people who feel that they are quuicker at getting stuff than other students. That means practice really hard and you could be really good. Rely on natural ability and you will not develop.
    [/QUOTE]



    Dear Jen,
    The thing about thinking that they are getting it more quickly than others is that they must not be giving full attention to the instructor or to their own dance if they are able to notice this.
    Also, often the student who is the slowest in the beginning often has a far more in depth knowledge of what they are doing than those who superficially feel they are learning faster than others. Those who tend to learn a little more slowly, I think, often have a deeper connection to what they are learning on some levels, and its shows years down the road instead of immediately. Those who understand that there is something far deeper than just superficial "right movement" tend to be better dancers later on. At least this has often been my experience with dance students.
    Regards,
    A'isha

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    V.I.P. jenc's Avatar
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    You have just put into words something I have noticed - sometimes I find it so difficult and in the end it turns out that I have been trying to get more detail, or do something the "hard way" eg use different muscles and it turns out in the end that I've really got it down enough to vary execution, and then I'm delighted!

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