Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29
  1. #21
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Pacific Northwest USA
    Posts
    5,313
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Literature

    Dear Zurah,
    Here is the List of some of the books/ articles I have mentioned.

    First, not sure if you all went to the Aramco info I posted, but Aramco publishes a free magazine that is all about culture in various Arab/ Turkish, and other Muslim countries around the world. To subscribe: Saudi Aramco World : March/April 2007

    Writers on Egyptian film-
    Wassef, M. ( July- August, 1995) "Egypt through the Looking Glass". UNESCO Courier, p. 94.

    Wassef also wrote a book called "One Hundred Years of Egyptian Cinema". I have not read it but plan to do so when I can find it.

    At the following address, you can find some great workshop notes on film in Egypt, including a section from the Library of Congress called "Appreciating the Egyptian musical film: song and dance in context", by Roberta L. Dougherty:
    http://www.geo.uni-mainz.cme.cinema/...ence/work2.htm.

    I do not own Hoda Sharawi's autobiography, and can not recall the title, but if you Google her, you will find it. I read it and found it wonderful, She was an early Egyptian feminist.

    Other books I mentioned, and some I did not:

    Dwyer, W. "Moroccan Dialogues: Anthropology in Question" , (1982) ISBN 0-88133-293-3.

    Badran, M. "Feminists, Islam and Nation: Gender and the making of modern Egypt" (1995) ISBN 0-691-02605-X

    Davies, K. "The Orientalists: Western artists in Arabia, the Sahara, Persia and India" (2005) ISBN 0-9759783-0-6

    Any book that will concern itself with Cross-cultural communication so that we get a good idea that all people do not communicate in the same way. I have several good ones, but one that I think is excellent is:
    Levine, D.R. and Adelman, M. B. "Beyond language: cross-cultural communication" (1993) ISBN0-13-094855-1

    Books on Islam that will help us to better understand the religious atmosphere of the people. A good one is:
    Fazlur, R. "Islam", 2nd ed. (1966 and 1979) ISBN 0-226070281-2
    (I like this book because it discusses Islam as it is and also how it could or should be. This guy has an interesting slant on the issue of polygamy, for example, and where Mohammed ( peace be on him) was heading with his 4 wives rule.)

    I think that between reading outside the regular realm of the dance world and hanging out with my Arab friends for the last 30 years or so, has given me a pretty solid educational foundation. Don't leave it to the word of dance writers alone. There is often too much they are willing to overlook in their pursuit of their own agendas, as I believe that Aziyade pointed out about one author. This is not to say that dance writers never give good information, but that you should look for , I guess, sort of patterns of info to find the reality of any given dance situation. Dance is a part of the whole of its environment!!
    Regards,
    A'isha

  2. #22
    V.I.P. Aziyade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Cornfields of Evansville Indiana.
    Posts
    2,743
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    a recent bibliography, focusing on Orientalist paintings:


    Croutier,Alev Lytle. Harem: The World Behind the Veil (New York, NY: Abbeville Press, 1989).

    Edwards, Holly. Noble Dreams, Wicked Pleasures: Orientalism in America, 1870-1930, (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000).

    Freund, Charles Paul. “2001 Nights: The End of the Orientalist Critique,” Reason, Dec. 2001.

    Graham-Brown, Sarah. Images of Women in Photography of the Middle East, 1860-1950 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1988).

    Kabbani, Rana. Europe’s Myths of Orient (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1986).

    Little, Douglas. American Orientalism: The United States and the Middle East since 1945 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2002).

    Mernissi, Fatema. Scheherazade Goes West (New York: Washington Square Press, 2001).

    Porterfield, Todd. “Baghdad on the Hoosic: American Orientalism,” Art in America, Feb. 2001.

    Street, Linda. “Initial Lessons in Popular Orientalism from National Geographic Magazine” essay in Mainstreams and Margins: Cultural Politics in the 90s, edited by Michael Morgan and Susan Leggett, (Westport, CN: Greenwood Press, 1996).

    Stewart, Doug. “Imagining the Orient,” Smithsonian, Sept. 2000.

    Thornton, Lynne. Women as Portrayed in Orientalist Painting (Paris: Art Books International, Ltd., 1996).


    Fatema Mernissi's books are very thought-provoking. Reading her books is like listening to a favorite aunt telling you stories about her life.

  3. #23
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Turku, Finland
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default About Oriental Transnationalism

    Dear all,
    this thread interests me much as I am preparing my PhD in Folkloristics about Oriental dance (or what ever you name it ) in Finland from the perspective of intercultural encounters. I have danced "belly dance", mainly Egyptian style since 1990.

    Quote Originally Posted by A'isha Azar View Post
    I have "Oriental Trasnationalsim and Harem Fantasy".(---) It does consider many perspectives, not all of which I would consider to be truth. Shay himself writes some stuff that I would call nonsense, for example, but then you also have some real thoughts for consideration in the book, too.
    What parts of the book you find not truthful? And what about Anthony Shay's ideas, what is nonsense about them? All new critical perspectives to the texts I read and use as a research material would be helpful.

    There's a great bibliography for articles and books about this dance form in this book, and I would recommend it also as a great source for different perspectives to the dance.

    Looking forward interesting discussions on this list,
    Anu

  4. #24
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Pacific Northwest USA
    Posts
    5,313
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Literature

    Dear Anu,
    I will have to get back to you on that, since its been awhile since I read the book. I remember that especially his chapter on males dancing seemed very vague, sort of giving the impression that he was lumping all male dances together, whether they were located in Afghanistan or in Libya. I would have to re-read the chapter to give you particulars. At the moment, I can not recall a particular page, but will re-read when time allows.
    Regards,
    A'isha

  5. #25
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Male dancing

    Hello everyone,

    I noticed that no-one so far had listed Stavros Stavrou Karayanni's 'Dancing fear and desire: Race, sexuality and imperial politics in Middle Eastern dance' (Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2004). Karayanni is a Greek-Cyproit/homosexual/male belly dancer/scholar, and the book explores his quest for identity while theorizing about queer/postcolonial issues.

    I'm just researching for a paper about orientalism and ended up here by coincidence, but I thought it might be interesting for some of you.

    Greetings,
    S.

  6. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Lund, Sweden
    Posts
    50
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I just have "Belly Dance Basics" by Laura Cooper but I'll try to buy more books and have a great library of bellydance...

    have a nice weekend!!!

  7. #27
    V.I.P. Kharmine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Foot of the Rocky Mountains
    Posts
    1,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sarabin View Post
    ...I noticed that no-one so far had listed Stavros Stavrou Karayanni's 'Dancing fear and desire: Race, sexuality and imperial politics in Middle Eastern dance' (Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2004). Karayanni is a Greek-Cyproit/homosexual/male belly dancer/scholar, and the book explores his quest for identity while theorizing about queer/postcolonial issues. ...
    Thanks for the reference, Sarabin! That's one I'll bet most of us had not heard of as it's rather specialized, and produced by a university press.

    There are so many stories relevant to the evolution of what we call belly dance that it may be tempting for some to pick and choose only what fits their own theories. But every story has its place; we only have to honestly consider the context (is it for entertainment only? does it only address one aspect of popular culture? is it supposed to be an academic work? etc.), and the credentials of the writer.
    Last edited by Kharmine; 10-26-2007 at 07:31 PM. Reason: clarification

  8. #28
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    29
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Coming late to the party, but awhile back I put up a list on Amazon of Books (and one DVD) that I recommend for information on raqs, mostly from a historical perspective.

    One thing that I do recommend highly that's not in the list is the online essay followup for A TRADE LIKE ANY OTHER, "An hour for God and an hour for the heart": Islam, gender and female entertainment in Egypt. I highly recommend it; for my money it's the single best online resource for grasping the complex nature and issues regarding this dance in Egypt in more-or-less modern times.

  9. #29
    Junior Member SaraKat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Carrboro, NC
    Posts
    38
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm hoping to take a course on Orientalism in the spring, so maybe after that I will have more titles to share, but right now all I have is A Trade Like Any Other, which I loved.
    Thanks everyone for these references! I'll have to see if the university I work at has any in its libraries.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •