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  1. #11
    Member Nur Al Leyali's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasmine Bint Al Nubia View Post
    Co-sign Maswary!!!
    Now as for dancing for a large Hispanic crowd..why does that matter???
    Yasmine
    I wanted it to be oriented in something they would be interested in as a group... dance something with there taste as hipanic persons thats all.

  2. #12
    V.I.P. Yasmine Bint Al Nubia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nur Al Leyali View Post
    I wanted it to be oriented in something they would be interested in as a group... dance something with there taste as hipanic persons thats all.
    I'm sorry that you had such a bad experience, but it can be taken as a lesson. It's been discussed many times that many people in the public will not see the dance as we do..they have no idea how much heart, soul, money and time it takes to learn to belly dance.

    In terms of the ethnic make-up of your audience, it's difficult to tell what each audience may like. In this case it wasn't the ethnic make-up as much as it was a group of rowdy, drunken men! Maybe the questions that could have provided you with some answers were:

    Is alcohol served at this venue?
    Will there be a mixed crowd in terms of gender?
    Is there gambling at the venue?
    Will food be served?

    Sometimes we want to dance so badly, that we want to believe that each expereince will reward us, instead, as dancers, we need to develop some realistic expectations.
    Yasmine

  3. #13
    Member LLAIMA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nur Al Leyali View Post
    I wanted it to be oriented in something they would be interested in as a group... dance something with there taste as hipanic persons thats all.
    .

    Hi nour: I'm very sorry your gig turn out this way, unfortunatelly as an oriental dancer your are going to have to deal with ignorant people from all cultures. I do want to congratulate you for keeping your standards and integrity as dancer. Next time ask as many questions as you can to avoid surprices. You might want to ask what type of event is going to be, wedding, birthday? etc, is there going to be a stage, a DJ, a changing room?
    Also you might want to ask who pays you and try to get paid before the performance. Make sure you have it all in writing prior to the event, signed by the client


    Now, you wanted orientation about catering to the hispanic crowd's taste, I personally like the Egyptian style and when I perform for hispanic audiences I still like to keep it that way but sometimes at the end of my performance I play a Hakim amd Olga tanon.
    But here is what most hispanic crowds relate to:
    Alabina
    Shakira.
    Last edited by LLAIMA; 09-08-2008 at 10:56 PM. Reason: spelling

  4. #14
    Member Nur Al Leyali's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasmine Bint Al Nubia View Post
    I'm sorry that you had such a bad experience, but it can be taken as a lesson. It's been discussed many times that many people in the public will not see the dance as we do..they have no idea how much heart, soul, money and time it takes to learn to belly dance.

    In terms of the ethnic make-up of your audience, it's difficult to tell what each audience may like. In this case it wasn't the ethnic make-up as much as it was a group of rowdy, drunken men! Maybe the questions that could have provided you with some answers were:

    Is alcohol served at this venue?
    Will there be a mixed crowd in terms of gender?
    Is there gambling at the venue?
    Will food be served?

    Sometimes we want to dance so badly, that we want to believe that each expereince will reward us, instead, as dancers, we need to develop some realistic expectations.
    Yasmine
    thank you for your lovely advice and i will remember it .. I should had known to ask this before and to ask many more things but i was anxious for this form of dance to get known in alabama more the it was so i accepted
    the agreement a bit hastily. but thank you.

  5. #15
    Member Nur Al Leyali's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LLAIMA View Post
    .

    Hi nour: I'm very sorry your gig turn out this way, unfortunatelly as an oriental dancer your are going to have to deal with ignorant people from all cultures. I do want to congratulate you for keeping your standards and integrity as dancer. Next time ask as many questions as you can to avoid surprices. You might want to ask what type of event is going to be, wedding, birthday? etc, is there going to be a stage, a DJ, a changing room?
    Also you might want to ask who pays you and try to get paid before the performance. Make sure you have it all in writing prior to the event, signed by the client


    Now, you wanted orientation about catering to the hispanic crowd's taste, I personally like the Egyptian style and when I perform for hispanic audiences I still like to keep it that way but sometimes at the end of my performance I play a Hakim amd Olga tanon.
    But here is what most hispanic crowds relate to:
    Alabina
    Shakira.
    yes i thought alabina would be beautiful for this group also thats why i had worked it into my performance with my brother playing live spanish guitar also as a special suprise to the birthday boy ... but it didnt happen and i should have known to ask those questions i have been dancing and studying oriental dance for almost 8 years but i was obviously over anxious to get this dance more known and in the community butttt i guess i learned a wonderful lesson .. most lessons have to be learned by incedent .... right . still i am so offened and hurt because my family seen this enviroment and was ashamed for what they had thought of me . my brother wanted to fight when the man started hitting on me .. it was awful. But i have learned a valuble lesson .... no more will i be so trusting .. paper work and many questions... and i believe some communities are just clossed to people like me. maybe alabama is that community. i hope not . but we will have to see. i am going to look up a dancer named aziza whom lives and teaches in alabama and talk to her a bit .. maybe share some thoughts and ideas. but thank you YOUR thoughts were very helpful.

  6. #16
    Member Phoebedances's Avatar
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    I am sorry to hear that the event was not what you hoped it would be and really feel for you in the amount of preparation that you went to. I think sometimes we hope to change the minds of people who don't have alot of respect and instead end up in a situation where it would be impossible to do so, such as this one with lots of loud drunken men.

    I am glad you took a family member with you for your safety. That is always a good tip - to take a friend or family member with you when hired for private parties/events, I think.

  7. #17
    Member Nur Al Leyali's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phoebedances View Post
    I am sorry to hear that the event was not what you hoped it would be and really feel for you in the amount of preparation that you went to. I think sometimes we hope to change the minds of people who don't have alot of respect and instead end up in a situation where it would be impossible to do so, such as this one with lots of loud drunken men.

    I am glad you took a family member with you for your safety. That is always a good tip - to take a friend or family member with you when hired for private parties/events, I think.
    I wasnt getting a good vibe from these people at all. thats why i was taking my brother he said he was bored any ways so i ask him would he like to make 50 dollars for playing a song for me AND HE TOLD ME HE WOULD NEVER ACCEPT PAYMENT FROM ME. and he went with me free and had learned the song alabina in 3 hours(hes so talented hehehe) I love my aby brother. just to be there for me and help hes my angel. He has never done a thing to me h has never lied in his life he doesnt do anything like boys his age he is 23 he is so mature.. he is my angel what can i say .

  8. #18
    Administrator Salome's Avatar
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    I don't want to seem uncaring or harsh because I've faced challenging show situations in my day, so I empathize! But I read your posts and felt compelled to say a few things, that I realize are totally unsolicited.

    In a perfect world a dancer would be respected, she would also be deserving of that respect and the show would be a wonderful, magical exchange, experience and journey.

    But it is not a perfect world. The reality is that when you do birthdays, anniversaries, and other types of celebratory private parties *sometimes* you will get clients who value and respect an artistic gift. And that's great. Most often you will have clients that are looking for entertainment value (nothing wrong with that), and then there are many clients who want your show as kind of a friendly shock or good natured embarassment for the guest of honor (some dancers don't mind that) and then the dregs who don't give two sh*ts about your "needs" as a person let alone an 'artist'.

    If you want to be a (satisfied) working dancer you need to first understand why you are doing it and that will help answer the question of where you should be doing it.

    No doubt that a working dancer deserves at least a basic level of respect, if in no other way at least respect in the business transaction. But never assume or expect that it will be forthcoming. Expect to spell it all out. Expect to have to protect your boundaries. Be ready to walk away and do it all cooly under duress.

    It's a hard lesson to learn, really pops the bubble and all that but performing for money, means entering a realm of dealing with all kinds of people and their agenda's. People who don't want to pay, people who want to treat you like a piece of meat, unsafe situations, harassment, dealing with drunks and all kinds of other unsavory stuff. Maybe it doesn't happen all the time, BUT it comes with the territory. If you can't handle it, handle them, handle yourself - it will be a pretty crushing road for you.

  9. #19
    Member Phoebedances's Avatar
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    well, you are lucky to have him

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