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  1. #11
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    Default i cant see lydia's vids

    were they removeD??

  2. #12
    V.I.P. Lydia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eugeniaargentina View Post
    were they removeD??
    Hi eugienaargentina,yes i did remove them yesterday ,i did not think it was interesting for anybody to still leave them there,but i have put them back so you can still have a look...have a nice day ,Lydia

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tribal Belly Dance Malta View Post
    I couldn't remember the yoga pose, but I have now its the Reclined Hero Pose
    I have placed a link for a youtube of how this is done, enjoy!

    YouTube - Restorative Yoga Poses : Restorative Yoga Reclined Hero Pose
    In this video,
    1. the woman is using a bolster to keep her knees from going into an extreme bend, which is much healthier than dropping the pelvis onto the floor. This is a great warmup/prep exercises for beginning backbenders, because it helps you get the pelvis level on the ground, which keeps the low back safe.
    2. She is indeed turning her toes out slightly from the knees. But, and this is key, she's internally rotating her thighbones so her knees and toes are still lined up!

    In my Pilates teaching, I work with a LOT of people with knee problems. One common movement pattern that they all have is the below-knee turnout, meaning that their knees may be pointing straight ahead, but their toes point out to the sides.

    In ANY position, but especially something that puts weight across the knee joint, such as backbends or bridges, your knees MUST be aligned with your shins and your second toes. Otherwise, you will damage your knees in the long term. (the knee is a hinge joint, like your door hinges. Imagine twisting a door hinge, then trying to use it in that twisted position. For years.)

    Quad stretches and hip flexor stretches really help with full laybacks, if you're looking to get all the way to the floor. Working to increase your internal rotation at the hip joint will also help you hit the floor without hurting your knees or low back.

    For standing backbends (and laybacks, and kneeling backbends too), you really need to work on spinal extension, especially of the upper thoracic spine (Mid-back, about bra strap level or higher). I see way too many people folding their extremely flexible low backs at 90 degrees, which does look really cool, but also looks like a disk herniation waiting to happen. A smoother arch looks just as cool and is healthier for the back.

    And on the ankle pain-- I find kneepads and double-folded legwarmers to pad the arches get rid of any ankle/knee pain I may have. If your problems are just from pressing bones against the ground, padding will help you right there! If it's deep and/or ligamentous, I'd need to look at you to tell you what's going on.

    vats of words,

    melissa v.

  4. #14
    V.I.P. shiradotnet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melissa Voodoo View Post
    the woman is using a bolster to keep her knees from going into an extreme bend, which is much healthier than dropping the pelvis onto the floor. This is a great warmup/prep exercises for beginning backbenders, because it helps you get the pelvis level on the ground, which keeps the low back safe.
    I had a yoga teacher who had us use yoga blocks for the same purpose as the bolster.


    Quote Originally Posted by Melissa Voodoo View Post
    For standing backbends (and laybacks, and kneeling backbends too), you really need to work on spinal extension, especially of the upper thoracic spine (Mid-back, about bra strap level or higher). I see way too many people folding their extremely flexible low backs at 90 degrees, which does look really cool, but also looks like a disk herniation waiting to happen. A smoother arch looks just as cool and is healthier for the back.
    Agreed. A useful way to learn how to do this is to get a few private lessons with a ballet teacher and learn how to do a cambré (I *think* that's how you spell it). This pose is a backbend of *only* the thoracic spine, and it's good training for doing the smooth arch that you're recommending.

    Quote Originally Posted by Melissa Voodoo View Post
    And on the ankle pain-- I find kneepads and double-folded legwarmers to pad the arches get rid of any ankle/knee pain I may have. If your problems are just from pressing bones against the ground, padding will help you right there!
    Back in my student days, I had a teacher who always taught floor work in her classes. I used to take knee pads and legwarmers to every class for this exact reason. This teacher also used to make top-of-the-foot pads that had a piece of elastic on one end to go around the big toe, and another piece of elastic on the other end to go around the ankle. I think they were made of an upholstery fabric that had vinyl on one side and light padding on the other.

    I always found that using the knee pads, legwarmers, and top-of-the-foot pads made class and home practice palatable. When it came time to perform, I discovered I didn't need to use any of them because the adrenalin of performing prevented me from feeling that particular source of pain!

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