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  1. #1
    V.I.P. lizaj's Avatar
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    Default ???The Issue of the "Professional"

    Yes we have discussed how we define a "professional bellydancer" especially with regards to earning a living.
    But we also have commented how it's important to have a professional attitude even if you are not actaully making any cash.
    So you are performing for a paying auidence- how can you be expected to behave in rehearsal, preparation as well as performance?

  2. #2
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Professionalism

    Quote Originally Posted by lizaj View Post
    Yes we have discussed how we define a "professional bellydancer" especially with regards to earning a living.
    But we also have commented how it's important to have a professional attitude even if you are not actaully making any cash.
    So you are performing for a paying auidence- how can you be expected to behave in rehearsal, preparation as well as performance?

    Dear Lizaj,
    There is really more to being a professional than merely being paid, as I point out to my dancers all the time. We pay anyone who is on our stage, not just the "professionals", and THAT is part of acting in a professional manner. Being professional means having a certain skill set and understanding how to use the tools and devices of one's work, in any job, and the same goes for belly dance. That is the true definition of professional.
    In rehearsals, I expect the people with whom I am working, first and foremost to be supportive of and involved in the whole event. This means they need to realize that each person and each artistic offering on the stage is every bit as important as any other person or offering that we are presenting, and that their solo dance is NOT the focal of the whole production, nor are they the "Star" of the show. I train my own dancers in this attitude from the beginning, and it seems to be the main frame in our "dance company culture" if you will. We have only had one person ever come in and realize that this does not work for her. She was there for one rehearsal and she left when she discovered that she was going to be just like the rest of us and not be allowed to dominate the performance or stand out as the most important act, etc. Usually, when they see how we operate, people get right into the swing of things and appreciate that our productions really are based on a holistic performance without one huge "Star". We also do a "Green Room" situation, in which we do not allow our performers to go into the audience in anything other than their street clothes. This is how it is done in professional theatre and we follow the same rules.
    In rehearsal and in set-up and striking the show, it is also nice if people are willing to come early and stay late in order to help out the sponsors or hosts, if that is necessary. I was in a performance last week-end where I was the only dancer who stayed after the performance to help our hosts to strike the set. I was pretty appalled at the lack of courtesy. If everyone had helped, it would have been done in a very short period of time. It took 4 of us over an hour where if all 10 of us had been there, it would have taken half the time.
    Professionalism means being aware of and responsive to your fellow artists when you are working with them, as well as what actually goes on, on the stage.
    Regards,
    A'isha

  3. #3
    Moderator Yshka's Avatar
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    Default

    Dear A'isha,

    it works that way for our dance group as well. I will try and give you rep for this!!
    edit: argh, I'm not allowed to give you rep. I guess it's always the same people I want to give reputation points...

    I want to add that for somebody to call themselves professional, they need to have certain skills and knowledge of what they are presenting, to be able to present it in a truthful way. IMO you are not just professional because you get paid, as you stated. There's so much more to it.

    It's a shame that a lot of people don't understand what it means to call yourself a professional AND to be one for real.

  4. #4
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Professionalism

    Quote Originally Posted by Yshka View Post
    Dear A'isha,

    it works that way for our dance group as well. I will try and give you rep for this!!
    edit: argh, I'm not allowed to give you rep. I guess it's always the same people I want to give reputation points...

    I want to add that for somebody to call themselves professional, they need to have certain skills and knowledge of what they are presenting, to be able to present it in a truthful way. IMO you are not just professional because you get paid, as you stated. There's so much more to it.

    It's a shame that a lot of people don't understand what it means to call yourself a professional AND to be one for real.

    Dear Yshka,
    Thank you and I can give YOU rep for working in a professional manner in a business where, you are right, many people do not seem to understand what that means at all.
    Regards,
    A'isha

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    V.I.P. lizaj's Avatar
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    Default

    Thank you Aisha for a brilliant assessment. ..I could not have articulated my feelings in such an excellent nutshell.
    I have met in my life very briefly a few top entertainers:actors,singers,comics and recently bellydancers. And it strikes me how the best have seemed to be the most aware of their responsibility towards their fellows and their audience. They are the ones with charm and consideration.
    As a teenager I queued in the pouring rain to get the autographs of eminent British actors in a Sheridan play. Two of them were very grand and titled and well loved performers. The scene: two soaked and shivering teenagers at the stage door of the Liverpool Playhouse. Both the titled actors were concerned for our comfort and one ,the wonderful Dame Margaret Rutherford dragged us into the theatre to get warm.
    The first time I saw BDSS, we met Mardi Love and when she chatted ,did she talk about herself no! No matter what we said , she turned the conversation to asking about us and what we did.
    Oh charm and consideration goes a long way and really impresses fans and fellow perfomers!

  6. #6
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Dance etc.

    Dear Lizaj,

    Quote Originally Posted by lizaj View Post
    Thank you Aisha for a brilliant assessment. ..I could not have articulated my feelings in such an excellent nutshell.
    I have met in my life very briefly a few top entertainers:actors,singers,comics and recently bellydancers. And it strikes me how the best have seemed to be the most aware of their responsibility towards their fellows and their audience. They are the ones with charm and consideration.
    I agree that being audience aware is a huge part of being a good, professional entertainer. So many dancers these days have an attitude that it's all about them.

    As a teenager I queued in the pouring rain to get the autographs of eminent British actors in a Sheridan play. Two of them were very grand and titled and well loved performers. The scene: two soaked and shivering teenagers at the stage door of the Liverpool Playhouse. Both the titled actors were concerned for our comfort and one ,the wonderful Dame Margaret Rutherford dragged us into the theatre to get warm.
    How wonderful!!! She is the lady who plays Miss Marple, right? I ADORE her and I am so glad she was so very gracious, but also not surprised because this kind of thing show in her character as well.

    The first time I saw BDSS, we met Mardi Love and when she chatted ,did she talk about herself no! No matter what we said , she turned the conversation to asking about us and what we did.
    Oh charm and consideration goes a long way and really impresses fans and fellow perfomers!
    I have never met Mardi Love, but she sounds warn warm and friendly. I hope I get to do so. I have noticed that whether or not I personally like their shows, that most of the BDSS seem very approachable. that may be part of the secret to their success.

    Regards,
    A'isha

  7. #7
    V.I.P. lizaj's Avatar
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    Dame Margaret played Miss Marple in the black and white films of the late fifties early sixties. I think she played herself in many ways and her husband was her side-kick the librarian.. The films strayed far from Christie's plots but were great fun. I have to report the night we met her she wore the same cape (or same style of) she wore in the films. My favourite is "Murder at the Gallop" and at the very end Robert Morley proposed to be rebuffed because Miss Marple was anti-hunting.


    Last edited by lizaj; 11-06-2008 at 06:16 PM.

  8. #8
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Miss Marple

    Quote Originally Posted by lizaj View Post
    Dame Margaret played Miss Marple in the black and white films of the late fifties early sixties. I think she played herself in many ways and her husband was her side-kick the librarian.. The films strayed far from Christie's plots but were great fun. I have to report the night we met her she wore the same cape (or same style of) she wore in the films. My favourite is "Murder at the Gallop" and at the very end Robert Morley proposed to be rebuffed because Miss Marple was anti-hunting.

    Dear Lizaj,
    Our PBS station used to carry some of her Miss Marples and I loved them!! Yes she is wonderful!!
    Regards,
    A'isha

  9. #9
    V.I.P. jenc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizaj View Post
    Dame Margaret played Miss Marple in the black and white films of the late fifties early sixties. I think she played herself in many ways and her husband was her side-kick the librarian.. The films strayed far from Christie's plots but were great fun. I have to report the night we met her she wore the same cape (or same style of) she wore in the films. My favourite is "Murder at the Gallop" and at the very end Robert Morley proposed to be rebuffed because Miss Marple was anti-hunting.

    Wonderful stuff - but agreed not very Christie

  10. #10
    Administrator Salome's Avatar
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    how can you be expected to behave in rehearsal, preparation as well as performance?
    Rehearsal and dressing room etiquette, I would say: be on time, don't be a distraction/disruption and stay focused, be, at least, courteous to the other performers, be prepared, share the space graciously...

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