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Thread: Workshop level

  1. #11
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gisela View Post
    Aisha
    Yes I understand it can be difficult. I experienced it myself at some workshops and recently at the nile group. Some descriptions did not come up until late, some were just not at all what later actually was taught( for good and bad) and some were correct but not very informative. I just think the sponsor would know that the community wants more info and insist on a description if there have been many requests at the previous event.

    Dear Gisela,
    In Egypt you do as the Egyptians do and often they have a different view on organizing than the Western one. Actually, throughout the Middle East nearly as I can tell. I am used to it and have come to understand the deeper meaning of "Inshallah"!
    However, that does not give license to the instructors and sponsors from the West to behave in the same manner. I would never dream of drastically changing the subject matter in a workshop. I may adjust the material for the level of the class, but if we advertised Exploring Shimmy or Concepts in Taqsim, then that is what we will study.
    I agree that sponsors and instructors need to make sure information is available to the dance community, and I do all I can to assist the people who sponsor me to give out good information.
    Regards,
    A'isha

  2. #12
    V.I.P. lizaj's Avatar
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    Even workshop organisers cannot always tell what an instructor will do. We had been told to brings zills to workshops this year and they never got out of the bag. The instructor obviously changed her mind! Also instructors may be forced into that position when they meet their class!
    Also an American or Egyptian teachers idea of an "advanced "student is probably very far adrift to what some "advanced" British students perceive.
    You're not a beginner, you have a grasp of basics so go with what appeals, ask for more information and read up on the instructor.
    I no longer chose anything that provides me with a choreography ( although you often get one anyway!), I go for things that will reinforce my basic technique, give me a new slant on something I already do. I am no longer up to taking on anything brand new, I avoid "the latest thing" and love to try new to me but "with a reputation" teachers.
    I was terrified of being with folks like Aida and Raqia and Asmahan but wouldn't have missed it for the world.
    It's about time you came to JoY!
    Lulu and Lorna and Meissoun as well as regulars such as Khaled,Tracy Kay,Anne , Candi and Maria...you can't go wrong

  3. #13
    V.I.P. da Sage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gisela View Post
    If everyone mailed the organisers then maybe that would teach them to be more precise with descriptions the next time or publish it on the website.
    The only time I have been really angry with a workshop is when the description was very precise, but mostly wrong. That was the fault of the workshop teacher, not the organizers...the workshop teacher sent over her own, beautifully written, but not accurate description of what would be taught and the level.

  4. #14
    V.I.P. da Sage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenc View Post
    Thanks, but I would also like some idea of what level 2 is [I]supposed [I] to mean. I know also in addition to the above that many damcers don't think that the requirements apply to them. at the moment we have someone in our level one class, intended for those who have done a year, who took a few lessons once and lived out there for a while.
    At our biggest local school, the line between levels 2 and 3 is when you can do all the basic hip moves well with any of the 6 or 7 most common zill patterns layered over them. We also do a lot with 3/4 shimmies and undulations over basic moves, and work on our arms, timing, and very basic footwork.

    The line between level 1 and 2 is more amorphous - basically, when you have all the basic moves down and can do zills over them, but 3/4 shimmy and undulation layering is less important. It seems like so long ago that I was in level 1!

  5. #15
    Moderator Safran's Avatar
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    There are as many ways to define levels as there are instructors, really. Sometimes it is just classified as beginners/intermediate/advanced, sometimes it is defined by the number of years learned, but lets be honest - neither of give much information. Try contacting the instructor or the workshop organiser. And if that won't work I second the suggestion of just "spying" around asking other people's workshop experiences.

  6. #16
    V.I.P. karena's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by da Sage View Post
    At our biggest local school, the line between levels 2 and 3 is when you can do all the basic hip moves well with any of the 6 or 7 most common zill patterns layered over them.
    Wow I have never heard of zills being a defining feature of level. Just goes to show how different places can be.

  7. #17
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karena View Post
    Wow I have never heard of zills being a defining feature of level. Just goes to show how different places can be.


    Dear Karena,
    I wonder what the 6-7 most common cymbal rhythms are. I usually only hear native belly dancers play about 2, those being Longa and the back and forth trills or runs or whatever they are called. ( You know, tek-ka tek-ka- tek-ka tek-ka adinfinitum. I teach cymbals about 6 months into a beginning course and work on them periodically after that throughout a dancer's student life. I use them often as a tool to reach people rhythms they will find in music, but not to use as dancers so much. I teach Egyptian and incredible cymbals does not seem to be a trend with them. I play reasonably well myself, but do not have occasion to use them often.
    Regards,
    A'isha

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    V.I.P. Kashmir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aisha Azar View Post
    Many times sponsors can not be more precise about what is going to be taught because the instructors have not given them any meaningful info.
    Or don't know themselves. I was shocked once when I realized an international tutor - whose workshops were spelt out in some detail and included a number of choreographies - the night before she was to start didn't not only not have her "choreographies" worked out (that's never a problem for me as I don't attend workshops for choreographies) - but had no idea of her music for most of the workshops.

    If the dancer is good and can teach well on the fly that isn't an issue ... but if they're not ....

  9. #19
    Super Moderator gisela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aisha Azar View Post
    Dear Gisela,
    In Egypt you do as the Egyptians do and often they have a different view on organizing than the Western one. Actually, throughout the Middle East nearly as I can tell. I am used to it and have come to understand the deeper meaning of "Inshallah"!
    I felt exactly the same in Cairo and defended this standpoint when some people I know complained about the shows not starting on time and lasting until 3 am. We go there to experience the country, culture and people. I have actually a tendency of "Inshallah" already so I could adapt quite easily .
    immer glimmer

  10. #20
    V.I.P. da Sage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karena View Post
    Wow I have never heard of zills being a defining feature of level. Just goes to show how different places can be.
    It's a Jamila Salimpour thing, I believe. Our big local teachers are from that line, so it's pretty standard around here (although most name teachers here have done personal studies in the Middle East as well).

    One local pattern list is:

    3's

    3 - 7 - 3

    3 - 3 - 7

    3 - 5 - 5

    3 - 5 - 1 - 3

    3 - 1 - 3 - 1 - 3

    And the "singles" - the bane of every beginning dancer.

    We drill all of these pretty mindlessly in class, but that makes it easier to mix them up later in solo performance.

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