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Thread: Zills

  1. #1
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    Default Zills

    There is a definite consensus around where I dance, but I want to know if you all agree.

    To be a professional belly dancer it is neccessary to play zills. If you don't use another prop (i.e. trays, candles, swords, snakes, etc) it is unnacceptable.

    I am currently struggling on the zill front so what is your opinion?

  2. #2
    V.I.P. Aisha Azar's Avatar
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    Default Fnger cymbals, sagat, zill

    Quote Originally Posted by Alyssa View Post
    There is a definite consensus around where I dance, but I want to know if you all agree.

    To be a professional belly dancer it is neccessary to play zills. If you don't use another prop (i.e. trays, candles, swords, snakes, etc) it is unnacceptable.

    I am currently struggling on the zill front so what is your opinion?
    Dear Alyssa,
    In order to be a well rounded dancer, you should know how to play finger cymbals. Many dancers in countries of origin do not play them for belly dance necessarily, but they usually do know how to play them for a beledi segment in the music, or for other types of dance within the larger performance, such as a Saidi segment. Let's put it this way. Without knowing how to play at least a few simple rhythms on the cymbals, you will be a less skilled dancer as well, since beating out those rhythms on the cymbals can teach you a lot about how rhythm works in the dance. Frankly, many native dancers are not officianados the way some western dancers are, but most of them are expected to play cymbals during their dancer shows at some point.
    they are hard to play at first, but practice every day for 10 minutes and I expect you will see some improvement. It took me about a week to begin to get it following this regimen every day when I first started dancing.
    Regards,
    A'isha

  3. #3
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    Thank you! This is almost the same thing my teacher, Kanina, says. I appreciate your encouragement.

  4. #4
    Junior Member sabrinabellydancer's Avatar
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    Default

    ita that its really important to learn to zill.
    you don't have to do it every time you perform, but certain venues and audiences will expect it so its important to have in your skill set.

    also, it is an important part of the fundamentals imo.

  5. #5
    V.I.P. Jane's Avatar
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    The things that take the longest to master are usually what you end up liking the most! Keep up the zilling 'cause everyone you meet will ask you, "belly dancer! So do you play those little things?"

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alyssa View Post
    There is a definite consensus around where I dance, but I want to know if you all agree.

    To be a professional belly dancer it is neccessary to play zills. If you don't use another prop (i.e. trays, candles, swords, snakes, etc) it is unnacceptable.

    I am currently struggling on the zill front so what is your opinion?
    I used to play them regularly but quite frankly, they bore me and the elastic hurt my fingers! I do not believe its a prerequisite to play zills in order to be a professional dancer, anymore than you must be young, slim and gorgeous. In fact, no prop in the world will make you a better dancer. I've used them all... veil, shamadan, stick, sword, zills, wings, veil fans, poi blah blah. They all add interest, but only in the way that a dazzling costume adds interest. After a couple of minutes, the novelty wears off, and if the dancing is not up to scratch, nothing will save it, no prop in the world no matter how adroitly used.

    So, please don't fret about this. If you can't master them, drop them, it doesn't really matter.

  7. #7
    V.I.P. Mya's Avatar
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    I love zils. LOVE them. I still suck at them though. For me they're a bit different than other props because they let you play with the music and be a part of the music even while you dance.

    I don't think it's a prerequisite, but i definitely think it adds something to your dance that for me is far more down to earth than a sword or veil or wings.

  8. #8
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    Thank you ladies for the input. Everyone seems to think zills are positive so I am practicing away.....and improving if I may say so myself.

  9. #9
    Moderator Farasha Hanem's Avatar
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    Sad

    One of my problems is we live in an apartment, and my husband freaks if we "get too noisy." My other problem is that my daughter works overnights, so even with Hubby out of the house, I can't zill without waking up the daughter. And I want to become better myself so much.

  10. #10
    V.I.P. Mya's Avatar
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    Baby socks Farasha...make zil mufflers with wee little baby socks and you're zils get very muted - you can still hear them, but they won't disturb other people.

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