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Thread: Eurythmics

  1. #1
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    Default Eurythmics

    Anybody ever used Eurythmics technique in their classes? I was trained in this when I did ballet, and remember doing it as young as 5 when I first started my ballet training. I used to love it and tried using it in my classes but found a lot of people struggled. Of course, I modified it from what I learned, and tried to keep it really simple.

    It was used to develop concentration and rapid physical reaction, time is shown by movements of the arms, and time duration, i.e., note values, by movements of the feet and body. In ballet class we had to do this with our feet at first and the time duration became longer and longer.

    In a typical exercise, the teacher plays one or two bars of music or drum pattern, which the student then executes while the next bars are played; thus, the student listens to a new rhythm while executing one already heard, an exercise requiring and at the same time developing concentration.

    I swear it is this training that enabled me to execute drum solos easily, which I love, and also my ability to improvise well. Anyone else done it and found it useful?

    http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0817911.html
    Last edited by Kharis; 03-22-2009 at 11:45 AM.

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    V.I.P. jenc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kharis View Post
    Anybody ever used Eurythmics technique in their classes? I was trained in this when I did ballet, and remember doing it as young as 5 when I first started my ballet training. I used to love it and tried using it in my classes but found a lot of people struggled. Of course, I modified it from what I learned, and tried to keep it really simple.

    It was used to develop concentration and rapid physical reaction, time is shown by movements of the arms, and time duration, i.e., note values, by movements of the feet and body. In ballet class we had to do this with our feet at first and the time duration became longer and longer.

    In a typical exercise, the teacher plays one or two bars of music or drum pattern, which the student then executes while the next bars are played; thus, the student listens to a new rhythm while executing one already heard, an exercise requiring and at the same time developing concentration.

    I swear it is this training that enabled me to execute drum solos easily, which I love, and also my ability to improvise well. Anyone else done it and found it useful?

    http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0817911.html
    sounds great if you can do it - my coordination isn't up to that - yet???

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Mosaic's Avatar
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    I had never heard of this, sounds like it would be quite difficult to learn though. I think this sort of thing is much easier to learn when you are a child or even a teenager. If adults have had previous dance or music studies they may also find they are able to do it. Myself at 60, I think would struggle, trying to get the mind in gear with something like this - doing one thing with the body while the mind concentrates on another. I have enough difficulty with zills, I am OK if the music is slower paced but as soon as it speeds up the hands go spastic, even though the mind is hearing the rhythm/beat. I can imagine what would happen if I was listening to one thing and trying to actually do another I would love to see it in action though.
    ~Mosaic

    PS: When I saw the title I thought it must be something about the group Eurythmics, interesting they have that name, I wonder if they or someone in the group knew about had practiced eurythmics.
    Last edited by Mosaic; 03-22-2009 at 10:33 PM.
    Dance is like glitter, it not only colours your life, it makes you sparkle, you find it everywhere and in everything and it's near impossible to get rid of. (unknown)


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