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  1. #61
    Member dreamthief666's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caroline_afifi View Post
    Exactly. What we call it doesnt really matter, it is what we do that counts.

    I was watching some dancers at a party last night, and whilst they didnt have all the moves, some really did have the 'spark'.

    There was a few little incidents were things went wrong and you could see the fear and them starting to shake. I often teach 'what to do and how to 'act' in this situations as the 'real' emotions are not what th audience have come to see.

    I think it is what makes people stand out from the rest.

    i have to say as a member of the audience, i would rather see a dancer that appears to love dancing for you even if she isn't perfect, rather than a dancer than dances like an automitron

  2. #62
    Member Freddie's Avatar
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    Yeah, me too, unless we're talking eighties robotic dancing of course.

    Oooh I've just had a horrible vision of some sort of bellydance-kraftwerk fusion!

    Seriously though, on ANTM (America's Next Top Model for the unenlightened lol), Tyra sends the models to drama sessions (the dig-deep-in-yourself sort) to get them to express emotion when they are modelling. And when I photograph people the ones who come out best are those who can express emotion when they are posing. It really doesn't matter how good looking they are or how good their figures are, the best shots are when the subject can project something of their inner selves.

    And more often than not those subjects are over the age of about 30. I think this might be partly because they have more "life experience", and partly because they understand what "projection" is and how to "ooze" it.

    Was it Bert Balladine who said "you have nothing to dance about until after you're 35"? (I'm paraphrasing there, it was in the NADA mag if you want the correct phrasing.)

    But it can be terrifically difficult for some people. I have had younger subjects who can do it, and I am always thrilled when it happens, and of course I've seen younger dancers express themselves well in performance, but the older ones do seem to kinda "get it" more I think.

  3. #63
    Premium Member Aniseteph's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freddie View Post
    Oooh I've just had a horrible vision of some sort of bellydance-kraftwerk fusion!
    Off topic, but I had to look on YouTube, can't resist a fusion-search. YouTube - january kismet 09

    (sorry, back to topic!)

  4. #64
    Super Moderator gisela's Avatar
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    And they are just ALWAYS there, aren't they?! (the fusions, I mean)
    immer glimmer

  5. #65
    V.I.P. Caroline_afifi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dreamthief666 View Post
    i have to say as a member of the audience, i would rather see a dancer that appears to love dancing for you even if she isn't perfect, rather than a dancer than dances like an automitron
    yes for sure.

  6. #66
    V.I.P. Maria_Aya's Avatar
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    As a teacher I encourage students that are good teqnicaly to start dance, even if their facial expression is not there "yet".
    But perform not to pro-payed events but more into school things, and shows.
    This will give them the confidence to move on.
    On the other hand I dont encourage them to go pro "yet" as the situation in reality are hard and harsh and something like this, at the begining might block them even more.

    I was told years ago that some people "have" it some not.
    I dissagree, I believe its something it can be build up, and there are methods on this also.
    But its difficult and need's time and effort, and its not working always.
    The trap is not to look "fake" face on stage, cause this is even more ridiculus.

    Maybe for mediteranian, latin nations is more easy as we are more open, and for European North and other nations more difficult, I know its difficult for Japanese to get to the face expression point, as in their culture is considered not good to show emotions, so imagine the road they have to do.
    But I've seen on the other hand one Japanese dancer in Cairo, that her face was "dancing" more than her body and she was delightfull.

    Maria Aya

  7. #67
    V.I.P. Caroline_afifi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maria_Aya View Post
    I was told years ago that some people "have" it some not.
    I dissagree, I believe its something it can be build up, and there are methods on this also.

    Maria Aya
    And that is a very nice perspective to adopt.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caroline_afifi View Post
    But has not got the 'spark' ....

    As a teacher, would you put forward a student for pro dancing if they have all the moves but dont have any spark?

    I am seeing increasing numbers of technically good dancers but they are deviod of emotion and expression.

    Do you think as teachers we should be encouraging pro dancing in people who are expressionless but technically brilliant?

    Are we as teachers objective enough to recognise when we are doing this?
    but being a dancer is technique and emotion
    are they really a "dancer" if they have one but not the other??
    and this goes with most dance forms but ESPECIALLY raqs sharqi

  9. #69
    V.I.P. jenc's Avatar
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    Expression is not just the face is it? In fact it didn't occur to me that this was about facial expression at all until it was raised just now. For me expression is about flow, grace, dramatic tension in ebb and flow, not dancing strictly perfectly to the rythmn but knowing when to hold or linger, the fit of steps to music...........................................

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenc View Post
    Expression is not just the face is it? In fact it didn't occur to me that this was about facial expression at all until it was raised just now. For me expression is about flow, grace, dramatic tension in ebb and flow, not dancing strictly perfectly to the rythmn but knowing when to hold or linger, the fit of steps to music...........................................
    good description

    this is the description of a good dancer of any dance form
    having the technique only does not make you a dancer at least not a pro dancer

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