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Thread: Rules of beledi

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    V.I.P. Tarik Sultan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pirika Repun View Post
    OK. Then what kind of music is this? Also it's common to do floor work with this kind of music, or only Nagwa did back in 70s? If Aida teaches Naguwa's floor wrok routine now, does any other dancers perform or teach also? If some famous star dancers like Naguwa did floor work, why not many people copy or perform it? What is the real reason not Egyptian dancers don't do floor work? Some say floor is durty, but then why only shamadan? So many questions just come up...
    Nagwa got away with it because A she was well connected and B she said it was set in "the Past". Floor work in general was outlawed after the revolution because it was considered too suggestive, or at least that is what I was told.

    For folk dances its allowed, but even then the only night club dancer I saw do floor work with Shamadan was Nadia Hamdi. I guess rolling over with something on your head isn't seen as suggestive because the focus of attention is the object.

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    **Bold used here to distinguish speakers only**

    [QUOTE=Caroline_afifi;116670]mmmm...

    Sometimes the search to keep things 'new' takes us nowhere.

    I have the Nagwa fouad video and at this time she was experimenting with many things including dancing through hoops and jumping out of cakes (ala Asmahan).

    Or should we say Asmahan jumping out of a cake ala Nagwa. Nagwa once made her entrance on a choochoo train.

    It sounds a bit vague saying dance of the 'awalim'.

    There are old Egyptian films set in the era of Haroun El Rachid where the dancers did the fancy floorwork, but it is unlikely the dance elements were based on any real dance anthroplogy or history.

    Most likely pure fantasy based on Hollywood fantasy.

    Some people in Egypt believe that anything in an old film is a real account of what was happening in the past.

    Same thing in the US. Hate to tell you how many of my students thought Zeena Warrior Princess was historical! Its a world wide problem. So many people think if its on T.V, the movies or written on the internet it must be true

    This can only be relevant where the film was portraying the period in which it was made (like any film made in any country).

    I was actually very surprised to see how closely period Egyptian films mirrored Hollywood sex and sand movies, not only in costuming, but even the dance scenes.

    Floor stuff is still used in some Shaabi clubs but never seen it done like this..

    This wasn't meant to be Shabbi style dance. It was just a choreography.

    The leg split thing I saw recently when the dancer was balancing beer bottles on her head.

    Fifi use to do running splits when she was doing her Mohamed Ali dancer routine. Nadia Hamdi would finish her dance by going into a spin and jumping into a split too.

    The style of this is very much like Khaleds Mahmouds (minus the floor embellishment)

    The music is Shaabi (Mohammed Rushdi me thinks).

    No, this isn't Shabbi, its pop. This is a Balig Hamdi song that was originally written for Afaf Radi. I think this version was sung by Fadl Shakr. Rushdi, Balig and Moogi, (can't remember his first name), are the ones responsible for the inception of Shabbi, which in the early 60's was a new sound, but Balig also composed music that was not Shabbi. He was married to Warda at one time and wrote songs for her as well.


    To address what you said about international festivals. In some instances its because they are free to do things that they couldn't do in the 5 star night clubs in Egypt. The stuff Aida does on the floor for example, is something that you you will see people in the local areas do when they dance socially. Things like picking up chairs in their teeth etc, are all things that are part of REAL Egyptian dance, but are considered too low class by the establishment to be presented in a fancy nightclub. However, because we are outsiders, we don't have these hang ups. We tend to want to see and experience the full spectrum of Egyptian culture and so, at times, they will do things for us that they would ordinarily only do when dancing socially, or if they were performing for a very local audience, or things they remembered seeing when they were growing up. For example, the way Lucy interacted with the audience in the big clubs was very different than the way she did her shows in her own club Parisiana. She was allowed to be a lot more interactive and informal.

    Also, because they are in a free environment, made up of fellow artists and enthusiasts, they can be experimental in other ways as well. I think that as long as they are honest about what they are doing, its all good.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Pirika Repun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarik Sultan View Post
    Nagwa got away with it because A she was well connected and B she said it was set in "the Past". Floor work in general was outlawed after the revolution because it was considered too suggestive, or at least that is what I was told.

    For folk dances its allowed, but even then the only night club dancer I saw do floor work with Shamadan was Nadia Hamdi. I guess rolling over with something on your head isn't seen as suggestive because the focus of attention is the object.
    Thanks, and it's all make sense about focus on object on the head.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarik Sultan View Post
    Hate to tell you how many of my students thought Zeena Warrior Princess was historical!
    It wasn't??? I'm just kidding.

    No, this isn't Shabbi, its pop. This is a Balig Hamdi song that was originally written for Afaf Radi. I think this version was sung by Fadl Shakr. Rushdi, Balig and Moogi, (can't remember his first name), are the ones responsible for the inception of Shabbi, which in the early 60's was a new sound, but Balig also composed music that was not Shabbi. He was married to Warda at one time and wrote songs for her as well.
    I'm confused now.

    OK I’m getting little bit off topic and more related to “shaabi” thread, but please bear with me. This song that Aida used for her floor work choreography was “Pop music” and she choreographed to whatever she wanted to (for international WS). I understand it. Then my question is pop music is belong to baladi or totally different category? You said that pop music/style is different from shaabi and baladi either. So, pop music/style is totally belong to different category? Do both pop and shaabi belong to baladi that in huge meaning and category that distinguish from sharki/classic?

    Maybe I try to analyze or make it clear too much, but I’m still learning, and so many questions come up….

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pirika Repun View Post

    I'm confused now.

    OK I’m getting little bit off topic and more related to “shaabi” thread, but please bear with me. This song that Aida used for her floor work choreography was “Pop music” and she choreographed to whatever she wanted to (for international WS). I understand it. Then my question is pop music is belong to baladi or totally different category? You said that pop music/style is different from shaabi and baladi either. So, pop music/style is totally belong to different category? Do both pop and shaabi belong to baladi that in huge meaning and category that distinguish from sharki/classic?

    Maybe I try to analyze or make it clear too much, but I’m still learning, and so many questions come up….
    Baladi is a different style of music. Its the music of the common people from the generation before Shabbi. Its like Funk and R&B both came out of the working class black neighborhoods, in the 60's and 70's and Hip Hop came out of the same neighborhoods in the late 70's and 80's.

    So Classical music is one style, pop music is one style of music, Baladi is another style of music that came out of the experience of the people who migrated to the urban areas and Shabbi is the music that grew out of Baladi.

    The song in the video is not Baladi at all, its a different style of music, different sound, feel and musical composition totally.

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    Senior Member Pirika Repun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarik Sultan View Post
    Baladi is a different style of music. Its the music of the common people from the generation before Shabbi. Its like Funk and R&B both came out of the working class black neighborhoods, in the 60's and 70's and Hip Hop came out of the same neighborhoods in the late 70's and 80's.

    So Classical music is one style, pop music is one style of music, Baladi is another style of music that came out of the experience of the people who migrated to the urban areas and Shabbi is the music that grew out of Baladi.

    The song in the video is not Baladi at all, its a different style of music, different sound, feel and musical composition totally.
    Thanks. Now I'm clear.

    However, I need to listen more music to define which song belongs to which category....

    Back to original question
    Quote Originally Posted by kayshier View Post
    I didn't know what else to call it.

    anyway, is it typical or even correct, to do floor work in a beledi piece?
    is it one of those cardinal rules you just don't venture into?

    are there any other do's and dont's for a beledi piece?
    So, is there any do's and don't? I think for baladi is more earthy feeling and movement, and not many fancy steps to cover the space.... Of course feeling is different than sharki, but other than this I don't know... I'll wait more veteran and knowledgeable member to answer the question.

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    come on
    simply beledi is the belly dance of the countryside in egypt and it`s : البلدى
    i think you talking about that
    and i can upload videos for it but i don`t know about the copyright in the forum here

  7. #37
    V.I.P. Tarik Sultan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by egyptien guy View Post
    come on
    simply beledi is the belly dance of the countryside in egypt and it`s : البلدى
    i think you talking about that
    and i can upload videos for it but i don`t know about the copyright in the forum here
    Welcome to the forum. Baladi has many meanings and the one you gave is one of them. It can mean the country style dance, or it could also mean the dance style of the regular people, or the style of the people of the lower class.

    as far as videos, if they are youtube, there's no problem. There's an application on the top right corner for youtube. all you need to do is copy the letters and numbers after the = and paste them between the brackets
    [ YOUTUBE ] (NUMBERS AND LETTERS HERE) [ / YOUTUBE ]

    I look forward to your input.
    Last edited by Tarik Sultan; 05-23-2009 at 02:31 AM.

  8. #38
    V.I.P. Caroline_afifi's Avatar
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    Or should we say Asmahan jumping out of a cake ala Nagwa. Nagwa once made her entrance on a choochoo train.
    yes, that's what I meant... it's nothing new.

    Most likely pure fantasy based on Hollywood fantasy.
    Or just Eastern fanyasy as this exsists too.. I think fantasy and 'legend' is pretty much universal.

    Some people in Egypt believe that anything in an old film is a real account of what was happening in the past.

    Same thing in the US. Hate to tell you how many of my students thought Zeena Warrior Princess was historical! Its a world wide problem. So many people think if its on T.V, the movies or written on the internet it must be true
    yes, again Universal, people still thjink Robin Hood is real and the four Muskateers.


    I was actually very surprised to see how closely period Egyptian films mirrored Hollywood sex and sand movies, not only in costuming, but even the dance scenes.
    Fashion sweeps the globe..

    This wasn't meant to be Shabbi style dance. It was just a choreography.
    I dont know how it was advertised but it is not clear by just looking.

    Fifi use to do running splits when she was doing her Mohamed Ali dancer routine. Nadia Hamdi would finish her dance by going into a spin and jumping into a split too.
    Ouch!

    The music is Shaabi (Mohammed Rushdi me thinks).

    No, this isn't Shabbi, its pop. This is a Balig Hamdi song that was originally written for Afaf Radi. I think this version was sung by Fadl Shakr. Rushdi, Balig and Moogi, (can't remember his first name), are the ones responsible for the inception of Shabbi, which in the early 60's was a new sound, but Balig also composed music that was not Shabbi. He was married to Warda at one time and wrote songs for her as well.


    Ok, I will have another listen but this is presented in shaabi style... what is the difference between most pop and shaabi?


    To address what you said about international festivals. In some instances its because they are free to do things that they couldn't do in the 5 star night clubs in Egypt. The stuff Aida does on the floor for example, is something that you you will see people in the local areas do when they dance socially. Things like picking up chairs in their teeth etc, are all things that are part of REAL Egyptian dance, but are considered too low class by the establishment to be presented in a fancy nightclub. However, because we are outsiders, we don't have these hang ups. We tend to want to see and experience the full spectrum of Egyptian culture and so, at times, they will do things for us that they would ordinarily only do when dancing socially, or if they were performing for a very local audience, or things they remembered seeing when they were growing up. For example, the way Lucy interacted with the audience in the big clubs was very different than the way she did her shows in her own club Parisiana. She was allowed to be a lot more interactive and informal.

    Also, because they are in a free environment, made up of fellow artists and enthusiasts, they can be experimental in other ways as well. I think that as long as they are honest about what they are doing, its all good.
    [/QUOTE]

    Yes I understand this, I think though their is pressure to keep developing new things to get people coming back. I see it here at festival all of the time and there are some workshops with very starnge titles these days.

    Look out for 'Ottoman Shaabi' next time.

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