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  1. #11
    Junior Member Rue Sailmana's Avatar
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    I thought you were talking about the whole picture, but I see it is only about the different styles and steps etc.

    It seems to me that everyone that wants to be bellydancing, should know what style he dances and generally what every step is called use in the followed class. Also you should know about the different rythms. Because you need all this to start with if you want to dance at all! I cannot imagine that you can dance without knowing what dance you are doing and without hearing the difference between two pieces of music. So in my eyes it is also basic information for hobbyists, not only for the advanced.

    As for all the rest of the information (background, where it originates, important dancers and musicians etc), that is more for the dancers that are interested and the dancers that want to perform and/or give lessons.
    Last edited by Rue Sailmana; 06-09-2009 at 05:08 AM. Reason: translationproblems

  2. #12
    V.I.P. jenc's Avatar
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    But there are several very distinct styles that call themselves bellydancing. To my mind everyone should at least know whether they are learning tribal or egyptian -

  3. #13
    Super Moderator Mosaic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rue Sailmana View Post
    [snip]

    It seems to me that everyone that wants to be bellydancing, should know what style he dances and globally what every step is called. Also you should know about the different rythms. [snip]
    I don't think there are global names/terms for various steps/movements. A lot of steps/movements have a variety of names, which can be confusing from one teacher to another. I also have noticed terms or names used in the States can be quite different to what is used here.

    Also the terms/names are a western innovation, the idea of naming very likely came about so students could form a 'mental' picture of a dance step. As far as I can ascertain Raqs (originally) in its variety of forms didn't have a naming system for various steps/movements, they just 'did' them I doubt that if you went to some village and saw them dancing and asked what is that movement called, that you would be given a name for it, they wouldn't have a name to give you.

    One of my teacher's is a Lebanese/Egyptian and has said that the names of steps etc are a Western innovation, that what she teaches and learn't in the 'womb' so to speak, didn't have any naming system. She does use terms for various movements so if she calls out a movement we know what to do My other teacher ( Australian) uses fairly set terminology, but it is terminology that is definitely with an Aussie slant.

    Sorry for the ramble, but it would be difficult to have a 'global' system, as culturally people 'see' things and therefore name things in a different way. Hope I haven't confused anyone from my odd cultural angle
    ~Mosaic
    Dance is like glitter, it not only colours your life, it makes you sparkle, you find it everywhere and in everything and it's near impossible to get rid of. (unknown)


  4. #14
    Junior Member Rue Sailmana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mosaic View Post
    I don't think there are global names/terms for various steps/movements. A lot of steps/movements have a variety of names, which can be confusing from one teacher to another. I also have noticed terms or names used in the States can be quite different to what is used here.

    Also the terms/names are a western innovation, the idea of naming very likely came about so students could form a 'mental' picture of a dance step. As far as I can ascertain Raqs (originally) in its variety of forms didn't have a naming system for various steps/movements, they just 'did' them I doubt that if you went to some village and saw them dancing and asked what is that movement called, that you would be given a name for it, they wouldn't have a name to give you.

    One of my teacher's is a Lebanese/Egyptian and has said that the names of steps etc are a Western innovation, that what she teaches and learn't in the 'womb' so to speak, didn't have any naming system. She does use terms for various movements so if she calls out a movement we know what to do My other teacher ( Australian) uses fairly set terminology, but it is terminology that is definitely with an Aussie slant.

    Sorry for the ramble, but it would be difficult to have a 'global' system, as culturally people 'see' things and therefore name things in a different way. Hope I haven't confused anyone from my odd cultural angle
    ~Mosaic
    Lol, the word globally was me typing to fast: In dutch 'globaal' means rough/broad/generally, but I translated it in globally. So I meant to typ about the same thing as what you put out here so beautifully, that there aren't exact names for steps. I will change the post, it would make a bit more sense after. Thank you for pointing me out
    Last edited by Rue Sailmana; 06-09-2009 at 05:07 AM.

  5. #15
    V.I.P. alosha's Avatar
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    Another important thing is for the students to feel comfortable ASKING their teacher what they're learning. But that comes with time and maybe should be more of a priority in introductory classes? I know that my first classes was never defined, and made belly dance to be just a series of movements, leaving out the deeper meanings.

    I agree that some students just don't care to know. And the ones who really want to know and learn come here!

  6. #16
    V.I.P. jenc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alosha View Post
    Another important thing is for the students to feel comfortable ASKING their teacher what they're learning. But that comes with time and maybe should be more of a priority in introductory classes? I know that my first classes was never defined, and made belly dance to be just a series of movements, leaving out the deeper meanings.

    I agree that some students just don't care to know. And the ones who really want to know and learn come here!
    Yes but you would have to know that there are more than one variety of BD in order to ask So it is back to the teacher!!

  7. #17
    V.I.P. adiemus's Avatar
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    I am very grateful to Kashmir for her introductory dance classes - she made it very clear about the cultural heritage and background of belly dance, taught about the rhythms and music styles, and always includes 'safe dance practice' in her classes. I supplemented what I learned from her with what I gleaned from the internet - and landed up here fairly soon after I started searching for more information.
    I still think it's really important that people learn more than simply the movements - it's so much more than that! So I do think the teacher in an intro class needs to be clear about his or her approach to belly dance, so that students can become more knowledgeable, especially if they're inquisitive as I was! (oh and still am!).

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