Hemming frustrating fabric

SeeJaneDance

New member
Thank you so much for sharing! It looks like she's hemming a curve with the on-grain tulle...I wonder if you could use this technique for a circle skirt, or if bias tape would be better.

I'm also a bit confused about how she's pressing to get the hem to roll like that, but I'm sure that's just trial and error.
 

Shanazel

Super Moderator
I understand how she is doing it but can't explain it any better than she did. Sorry.

I'm sitting here playing with a piece of tulle. It has better stretch and flexibility on the crosswise grain than it does on bias. Stretching it on bias actually distorts the tulle in such a way that it doesn't readily recover.

Interesting. As much as I've used tulle I've never noticed that.

Darshiva, maybe silk tulle would be less irritating albeit more expensive.
 

Darshiva

Moderator
I don't know - all I know is that when opshopping sometimes I'll try on a gorgeous dress in a gorgeous fabric and the hem irritates me like mad. (breaking out in a rash bad)

Since I pretty much stick to costumes as far as a sewing machine goes, I'm not too worried about it aside from curiousity.
 

AndreaSTL

New member
Great tip, Shan!

Jane, I don't know if this will make any more sense to you but here goes. He is stitching the tulle to the right side of the fabric, flipping over to the back, then pulling the tulle away from the from the garment and pressing. You should be able to get the same result if you keep the fabric right side up, place the iron on the right side and slide the tip of the iron under the tulle to flip it over. Follow through with a bit more of the iron and you've pressed your seam open. Since you're working with a bias I would avoid using steam even though it's been stitched. Hopefully this helps, but if it doesn't and you have a quilter nearby ask her to show how she presses the seams to one side.
 

SeeJaneDance

New member
Thanks Andrea! That helps a lot! For some reason I just wasn't getting it from his explanation. I understand quilting a bit better, though, so that makes perfect sense. Thanks again!
 

Amulya

Moderator
It's actually quite handy to have some fabric over the hem like that, I tended to step in my hems and rip them. I have since started using different fabrics and hems.
Indian skirts have hems like these, but with a non irritating fabric, very handy, because otherwise you'd step into them accidentally: they are much longer than an average belly dance skirt, floor length so they need extra protection. If anyone wants to see a picture of how it looks let me know I can take one. The border is much wider though.
 
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