Is their anyone who dance the Ghawazee dance?

Aisha Azar

New member
Ghawazi

Dear Miss Winnii,
My dance company and I dance Ghawazi. We have costumes from several different eras in time and we can do Ghawazi in modern costume or in traditional. We think its a blast!!
Regards,
A'isha
 

Ludmilla

New member
Could someone define Ghawazee dance? (as w/ a lot of these terms, I have heard that for a type of turn, as well as for a dance style (?????????????:confused: ) So if someone has a good definition, would really be interested. (also if it is a style what geographical area or group of people is it tied to?) Thanks!!! Ludy
 

Aisha Azar

New member
Ghawazi

Dear Shanazel,
Aisha Ali has wonderful film footage of the Banat Maazin family of Egypt, who are probably the last remaining Ghawazi family from their part of Egypt.
Regards,
A'isha

Dear Ludy,
Please go to the net and type in "Edwina Nearing Ghawazi. This woman wrote a wonderful series about the Ghawazi in the 70s and it tells volumes!! (Back then her anme was Qamar El-Muluk.)
Regards,
A'isha
 

Mariesaffron

New member
miss winnii, the ghawazee is not a Dance, is a step that the Gypsies aka Ghawazee (plural) or Ghaziye (singular) use to do,read the Book "Looking for Little Egypt" and wach videos of Aisha Ali, Gypsy Caravan, Fat Chance Bellydance, I have seeing Aisha Ali Dancing Ghawazee, when she came to New Orleans in May 2004, she explained every thing about Ghawazee, she showed us how the Ghawazee costume is made and how to put it on for performance, if you want to know more let me know, Aisha Ali gave us a lot of material on the subject.
 

Aziyade

Well-known member
Ghawazee style has gone through a lot of changes apparently, and there were only two family forms to survive into today -- Sumbati and the Banat Mazin. (spelling?) Aisha Ali demonstrates Sumbati on her volume one DVD (I think Sumbati is a region and not a particular family) and there is lots of extant footage of the Mazin family dancers.

Alexandria (http://www.clonecomics.com/ghawazee.com/forsale/) teaches Mazin style Ghawazee from the 70s and 80s. There was a video produced by Bedia that featured a workshop on Banat Mazin Ghawazee steps, but I think it's long out of print.

Modern Ghawazee, as defined by Aida Nour, seems to be more flirty beledi, and more like Raqs Sharqi than Mazin style. Aida Nour's workshop videos from Little Egypt offer 2 Ghawazee workshops. I wasn't crazy about the choreography on them, preferring instead the old style Banat Mazin, but that's just me.
 

MirahAmmal

New member
I'll second A'isha--Aisha Ali has some really great footage and instructional video on this--she's done extensive research and field recordings of the the Banat Mazin and others. There are also a few clips of the Ghawazee (circa 1980) in "The Romany Trail" documentary video--Africa volume. Those clips are short and not particularly instructive, but it's interesting to see from that vantage point.

I don't know if she has any videos on it, but Denise Enan (of Canada) also teaches wonderful Ghawazee workshops.

Our troupe has a Ghawazee piece in our folkloric repertoire (actually, we're in the process of retooling it a bit.) It's not always easy for raks sharki-trained dancers to learn the style (the posture is sort of "bad" dance posture, the feeling is different, etc.), but it's beautiful and well worth it. :) It's also important to note that the form (both in the music and the dance) is highly improvisational in its original form, so even if you choreograph it for a group (which to make it stage/theater worthy is sometimes necessary), you'll want to try to create/maintain some sense of spontenaity in the dance....Oh, and listen to the drums. ;-)
 

Zemira

New member

Aziyade

Well-known member
I can't speak to the accuracy of the info, but Jasmin's article contradicts other sources I've read, just so you know. Also, the term Ghawazee has been used to describe BOTH general public dancers, and also the specific tribe of people we now associated as Ghawazee. Early Orientalist writers didn't differentiate between the two.

As for the coat, it was common Ottoman (basically Turkish) fashion at a time when the Ottomans were controlling Egypt. Public dancers were PAINTED wearing this fashion, although from what I understand, the majority of the "peasantry" weren't fashion-consicous and would have worn their own national clothing.

Check Gilded Serpent for Edwina Nearing's articles on the Ghawazee.
http://www.gildedserpent.com/articles25/edwinaghawazich1.htm



I'm very new to Ghawazee and have been doing some research on the net. I have come across these sites along with many others http://www.jasminjahal.com/articles/art_ghawazee_of_egypt.html
http://www.havenonline.com/moas/northstar/vol1no1/Gwazcoat.htm
Could I get some opinions on the accuracy of this information please. What era is the Ghawazee Coat from? I quite like the coat and would like to represent the era with the accurate style of dance.

Zemira
 
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