What are you doing during quarantine?

Zorba

"The Veiled Male"
The one in the meme - an '06 TJ. 1/3rd the price of a new one, and no damn "technology"! If there's one thing in this world that just screams "WRONG!", its a touch screen in the middle of the dash of ANY car, but most especially a Jeep! This one is pretty much everything I want in a vehicle and nothing that I don't want. No power crap, no cell phone crap, no leather crap, manual transmission. Haven't owned a vehicle like this in 20 years - had an '87 F-250 diesel that was very similar in its "non-technology" status. The *only* "technology" I want is cruise control and A/C. I'll be adding the cruise, it already has A/C (this is Florida).
 
Thought we had done an efficient job checking the yard for wildlife before allowing our dog out. Followed by sound and feathers of scattering ducks, pigeons, dove, and rabbits. Whoops. That's one happy dog. (Sigh.)
 

Zorba

"The Veiled Male"
Nothing to be scared of - its just a rather heavy chunk of steel - incapable of harm to anyone as long as you don't touch the trigger until you know what you're doing. The best cure for Hoplophobia is to get yourself to a nearby shooting range and take a class! They're a LOT of fun! They're also a responsibility - one that cannot be disrespected. I enjoy shooting obviously, but I really like the historical aspects. The rifle I'm holding is an M1 Garand, the rifle that largely won the second world war and is the quintessential Amerian Gun. I also own an Enfield, the quintessential rifle of Great Britain from the same time period. I had the metal refinished/restored on the Garand, and I refinished the stock myself. I'm not a great shot with it, my poor eyesight is part of that. I mostly collect pistols from the WW 2 era and a bit before/after. I have one that predates the first world war too.
 
Nothing to be scared of - its just a rather heavy chunk of steel - incapable of harm to anyone as long as you don't touch the trigger until you know what you're doing. The best cure for Hoplophobia is to get yourself to a nearby shooting range and take a class! They're a LOT of fun! They're also a responsibility - one that cannot be disrespected. I enjoy shooting obviously, but I really like the historical aspects. The rifle I'm holding is an M1 Garand, the rifle that largely won the second world war and is the quintessential Amerian Gun. I also own an Enfield, the quintessential rifle of Great Britain from the same time period. I had the metal refinished/restored on the Garand, and I refinished the stock myself. I'm not a great shot with it, my poor eyesight is part of that. I mostly collect pistols from the WW 2 era and a bit before/after. I have one that predates the first world war too.
You seem to belly dance pretty well despite the poor eyesight,but I guess eyeglasses and/or contacts help with that? I just wear eyeglasses since I've had bad eyesight since I was 7 or 8 years old.
 

Shanazel

Super Moderator
I mostly collect pistols from the WW 2 era and a bit before/after. I have one that predates the first world war too.
My brother and I inherited my dad's gun collection when he died. It included an 1842 french percussion musket that my great great grandfather carried in the Civil War. I passed it onto my son at Midwinter 2019.

Have you ever been t the Buffalo Bill Museum in Cody, WY? Amazing collection of firearms.
 

Zorba

"The Veiled Male"
I've heard a lot about the Buffalo Bill Museum, but nope, never been there. I have the family Enfield from the Civil War, a .63 caliber smoothbore caplock. Not in firing condition.
 

Zorba

"The Veiled Male"
You seem to belly dance pretty well despite the poor eyesight,but I guess eyeglasses and/or contacts help with that? I just wear eyeglasses since I've had bad eyesight since I was 7 or 8 years old.
Eye glasses by day, contacts by nite. I've had horrid vision since before it was found in 1st grade.
 

Ariadne

Well-known member
So hubby and I went on a date last night. We drove to the restaurant, parked outside, called them from the car to place our order, and when the cashier waved through window to let us know it was ready hubby went in and paid (with a card) and brought the food back out to the car where we ate. So a perfectly normal date. Other then the part where we called in the order from the parking lot, the cashier waved through window to let us know it was ready, my hubby went in and paid, and then brought the food back out to the car where we ate. Oh, and throwing the masks we used while out in the washer as soon as we got home, that was new too.

In other news all the masks we were making are finished. We ended up adding to them so all total it ended up being 50 masks and I am sooooo done with it. I have pictures of the finished product but I have to resize them for the forum still.
 

Shanazel

Super Moderator
Our grandson comes back over here this afternoon. We treat our household and my son's household as a single unit though we're 25 miles apart. Our grandson is here regularly since both his parents work shifts in essential first response and healthcare jobs. We're gradually getting the hang of online school but it has been a steep learning curve with plenty of glitches.
 

Ariadne

Well-known member
I have been wondering how many people will be sticking with the online school once this is all over... not to mention when it will be. Online school just might become a thing for a few years at this rate.
 

Shanazel

Super Moderator
There are some good online programs, but they need to be supplemented with real life experiences, especially in disciplines like science, art, and music. When my son was in high school, chemistry was taught by balancing equations and an occasional demonstration of lab experiments by the teacher. Students were not allowed to handle chemicals themselves. I was absolutely floored and totally appalled upon being told this by the teacher. Holy hell, we got to use chemicals and Bunsen burners when I was in eighth grade general science, never mind high school chemistry a few years later. Talk about turning kids into poorly experienced snowflakes who might melt if they get too close to an open flame, not to mention boring them out of their minds with endless equations to balance.
 

Ariadne

Well-known member
So true. It’s why I wonder if we might see a blending where things that absolutely must be done in person are scheduled at the schools in some way still. I don’t know, I just think there are a lot of options and this might result in some people getting creative.

I wondered that when they started shutting down the colleges too though and they just went with it so what do I know.
 

Ariadne

Well-known member
:LOL:

We didn’t have fire drills but once a year the science hall reeked of seafood as one of the science teachers dared his student to cook and eat various sea creatures as part of life sciences.
 
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